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Maya Moore Eying Olympic Gold

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    NEWSLETTERS

    From 2007-2011, Maya Moore played in four Final Fours and helped lead the Huskies to two national titles. She went to the WNBA, where she was the first overall pick, and then led a hapless Minnesota Lynx franchise to a title. But it gets better. And now the member of the U.S. National Team is eying Olympic gold. The summer Olympics will take place in London if the United States can win it all, Moore will join select company: she would be only the seventh player to win championships in college, the WNBA, FIBA (Moore accomplished that with Ros Casares this winter) and the Olympics.

    According to the Associated Press, Moore has 326-16 record since entering high school and this doesn't include the 22-0 stretch with USA Basketball. That works out to 16 losses in almost 10 years. "In comparison, Cheryl Miller lost 20 games in college while Diana Taurasi lost 17 games her first year playing for the Phoenix Mercury," noted the AP.

    Taurasi, one of the best players to ever suit up at UConn, was blown away by those stats. "Wow those numbers are impressive," she said. "If she keeps this pace going you might as well retire."

    Perhaps more impressive: Moore remembers every loss dating back to her freshman year in high school.

    "When you lose you learn from it and try not to let it happen again," she said. "Some of those losses have been heartbreaking. When that happens, the teams that I've been on try to learn from it and not let it happen again. History usually happens right after that loss."

    The wins, however, blur together, which is what happens when you average more than 30 a year. But Moore cited her game-winning shot in the 2005 AAU national championship game as among her favorite.

    "We were goofing around in practice the day before and came up with this play," she said. "Coach called timeout and we begged her to run the 'falling down' play."

    Words don't do the description justice so here's the moving-pictures proof: