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Wreh-Wilson Continues to Open Eyes

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    EAST HARTFORD, CT - NOVEMBER 27: Blidi Wreh-Wilson#5 of the Connecticut Huskies avoids the Cincinnati Bearcats after he intercepted a pass in the fourth quarter on November 27, 2010 at Rentschler Field in East Hartford, Connecticut. The Huskies defeated the Bearcats 38-17. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Blidi Wreh-Willson

    All four players representing UConn at the NFL Combine last week came out of the experience better than when they went into it. DE/OLB Trevardo Williams ran a sub-4.6 40, ILB Sio Moore continued to impress with his athleticism, and CBs Dwayne Gratz and Blidi Wreh-Wilson impressed scouts, coaches and general managers looking to bolster their NFL secondaries.

    It's hard to see which player benefited the most from the the dog and pony show that the combine has become (seriously, it's a bunch of 20-somethings running around in shorts and t-shirts), but Wreh-Wilson is a safe bet.

    NFL Network draft expert Mike Mayock spoke highly of Moore after his Senior Bowl performance in January, and now he appears to be high on Wreh-Wilson. In his post-combine rankings, Mayock has Wreh-Wilson as his fourth-best corner behind Alabama's Dee Milliner, Florida State's Xavier Rhodes, and Washington's Desmond Trufant. Mayock's pre-combine rankings didn't include Wreh-Wilson, who's 6-2, 195-pound frame intrigued some NFL teams.

    "Most of the teams that have been talking to me seemed to like the aggressive, pressing style that I do playing close to people and using my size and length to my advantage,” Wreh-Wilson said at the combine, according to SNY.com's John Silver.

    Despite his size, Wreh-Wilson said he's able to play inside, too (a position usually reserved for smaller, speedier corners).

    "In our system (at UConn), I wasn’t really required to play in the slot all the time," he said. "It was something we had, things I did in practice, things like that. But on the outside, basically, it was my freedom. When my coach made a call, I was the guy — I could choose to play off, I could choose to play press, any coverage. It was just kind of something that helped me out in the long run.”

    Wreh-Wilson's also been playing football a few years, which means that he's only going to get better. A fact not lost on scouts.

    "I feel teams are looking at my potential as one thing, but in the short amount of time I have been playing football, my resume’s pretty good," he said. "I’ve shown a lot of good things, a lot of positive things on the field, and I have an upside that a lot of guys don’t.”