Smut List Brings Cops to Affluent High School | NBC Connecticut

Smut List Brings Cops to Affluent High School

Greenwich High list posts promiscuity list.

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    In this Feb. 11, 2011 photo, a Facebook page is seen on a computer in Montpelier, Vt. Facebook on Thursday, Feb. 17, added civil unions and domestic partnerships to the list of relationships that its users can pick from to best describe their romantic status. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    "Juvenile and Sophomoric"  is how a police spokesperson describes a recent situation at Greenwich High School

    A so-called "smut list" has been making its way around the school, targeting females from around the area, the Greenwich Time reports. 

    For those who haven't heard of smut lists before, it's pretty much as the name implies. 

    Students have circulated a list that publicly names girls claimed to be promiscuous. It's a phenomenon that's become more prevalent among college and high school aged kids, thanks in large part to cell phones and social networking. 

    In this case, the Time reports, the Facebook list contained 99 names of students from Greenwich and neighboring towns in Westchester County, New York. 

    As you can imagine, the list did not sit too well with some.  Greenwich High Headmaster Chris Winters said there was a lunchtime incident that involved "strong disagreement," but no physical violence. Still it was enough for police to respond to the school.

    Despite the scuffle, students say they're laughing the list off, for the most part. 

    "They're kind of passing it off as something that's a joke, which it is," sophomore Hale McSharry told the paper. "It's stupid of the people to make it."

    Greenwich Police spokesman Lt. Kraig Gray said the matter is now in the hands of the Board of Education. 

    "There are disturbances every day at the high school," Gray said. "Some are worse than others. This was just another day."

    None of the students involved will face any disciplinary action and Winters expects to see more of these lists in the future.  

    Students, including McSharry, expect more talk about the dangers of online harassment. 

    "When people are at school, they react to things differently," McSharry said. "Who knows what they're really feeling? Hopefully nothing bad will come of this."