Feds Investigate Pampers DryMax Diaper Rash Claims | NBC Connecticut

Feds Investigate Pampers DryMax Diaper Rash Claims

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    The Consumer Product Safety Commission is looking into a handful of complaints in which parents claim diaper rash and severe blisters are linked to the new Dry Max material in Pampers Swaddlers and Cruisers.

    Cristina Hassinger of Oakville has been buying Pampers for her children for years. Recently, she says those diapers have been causing skin problems for her two-year-old son, Adam.

    "He started to get a weird patch of dry skin on his thighs and it spread up into his diaper area. And it went on for a couple of weeks, and it was starting to get itchy. Eventually he scratched it open, so it was pretty much just raw skin," said Hassinger.

    Hassinger was getting ready to take Adam to the doctor's when she heard about other problems parents were having with Pampers.

    "I switched diapers immediately, and it cleared up within two days," she said.

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission is looking into a handful of complaints like Hassinger's, in which parents claim diaper rash and severe blisters are linked to the new Dry Max material in Pampers Swaddlers and Cruisers.

    "I have a seven-year-old and we've used them since then, and we've never had this problem before," said Hassinger.

    Procter and Gamble, which makes Pampers, says the parents' claims aren't true, and there is no problem with the new Dry Max material. It says it has received less than two complaints about diaper rash for every million diapers sold. It attributes the complaints to parents who like the older versions of the diapers, or ones who support the competition. But Hassinger isn't sold, and she's joined four thousand other parents on a Facebook page warning others about the diaper problem.

    "Pampers' response has pretty much been that it's not their diapers, it's the parents that have become so emotionally attached to their product that they're just upset that they changed something, there so emotionally attached to it. It's just so ludicrous. I'll never go back," said Hassinger.

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission is asking any parents with complaints to contact its agency.