Blumenthal Controversy Makes Leno Monologue, Again | NBC Connecticut

Blumenthal Controversy Makes Leno Monologue, Again



    Today is the day that state party leaders will decide on their nominees for U.S. Senate, governor, some congressional seats and more. 

    While they are all important to Connecticut, the nation will be paying attention to the U.S. Senate race and the decision Democrats make today will likely affect comedy writers as they prepare for their late-night shows.

    For the second night in a row, Leno worked Blumenthal into his monologue.

    "In Connecticut, Attorney General Dick Blumenthal's campaign is now saying there are only four times that Blumenthal said he served in Vietnam when he really didn't," Leno said. "That is what politics has come down to now, when your campaign slogan is, 'I only lied four times."   

    Blumenthal’s statement that he served in Vietnam has garnered national attention since Monday night when the New York Timesbroke the news. On Tuesday, the attorney general defended himself, saying he misspoke and meant to say "during" the Vietnam War rather than "in."

    Leno also worked that into his delivery on Thursday night.

    "But Blumenthal said he is not apologizing for misleading people about his war record. He said all he did is use the word 'in' insted of the word 'during.'  He insists he just misspoke. You know, like using the word misspoke instead of the word lying."

    On Wednesday night, Leno also put his comic spin on the local controversy.

    “The Pulitzer Prize for fiction was handed out today, given to Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal for his Vietnam War memoir,” Leno said during the Tonight Show on Wednesday night. “Turns out he has no war record at all. In fact, only combat experience? Shooting himself in the foot,” Leno said.

    Leno ended the Wednesday bit in a way that only Leno can – tying it into the next target of his barbs – British Petroleum.

    "Some good news today for Blumenthal. Because of all the trouble he’s in for lying, he was offered a job as spokesman for British Petroleum."