Cheating Expert: Weiner is Not Alone | NBC Connecticut

Cheating Expert: Weiner is Not Alone



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    Rep. Anthony Weiner admits to sending a lewd Twitter photo of himself to a woman and then lying about it.

    Congressman Anthony Weiner tearfully admitted his online relationships at a news conference on Monday.

    "I've exchanged messages and photos of an explicit nature with about 6 women over the last 3 years," Rep. Weiner said.

    The unexpected admission came as a surprise to many, but not Dr. David Greenfield.

    "What surprises me is that it surprises other people because this is going on by the millions every day all over the country," said Dr. Greenfield, an internet and technology addiction specialist in West Hartford.

    "Nobody is above sexual behavior or sexual acting out or addiction. Nobody," said Dr. Greenfield.

    According to Dr. Greenfield, more people are using social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter to have virtual affairs, thinking it's anonymous.

    "Technology is the worst possible way to do it, because there is a record of everything and it's traceable and traceable and reproducible and if somebody has it on one end, it can be forwarded to somebody else," said Dr. Greenfield. "So it's probably the least secure method of engaging in communication, especially of a sexual nature."

    Ease of access is also the allure to online cheating. All you need is a phone or a computer, but Dr. Greenfield warns what may start out as a one-time thing can quickly spiral out of control.

    "All these technologies are very addictive and you can get wrapped up in it and lose track of time and space and yourself very easily," said Dr. Greenfield.