Town Heals and Remembers

Donations Pour Into Newtown Shops

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Stores around Newtown are taking hundreds of calls for donations. (Published Thursday, Dec 20, 2012)

    A blanket of sorrow hovers over Newtown, but people from all over are reaching out with acts of kindness because they want to help a community grieving after the school shooting.

    Someone from Virginia called Demitasse Cafe in Sandy Hook and donated $1,000 dollars to pay for every cup of coffee a Sandy Hook local orders.

    With 100 Cups of Coffee, Dispatcher Inspires Small Acts of Kindness Toward Newtown

    [LA] With 100 Cups of Coffee, Dispatcher Inspires Small Acts of Kindness Toward Newtown
    Inspired by Tom Cavanaugh s ordering 100 cups of coffee for patrons of the Newtown General Store, a friend of his sent candy to the small town shaken by a school shooting. Kim Baldonado reports from Northridge for the NBC4 News at 11 p.m. on Dec. 17, 2012. (Published Tuesday, Dec 18, 2012)

    Ana Tipton said she is truly moved by the random acts of kindness from strangers miles away.

    "She wants me to put a sign in the window that says from Richmond Virginia families to Sandy Hook families," Tipton said. “People that are far away don't know what else to do and everyone is really affected by this and felt they had to do something.”

    Kindness is also pouring in to Newtown General Store on Main Street.

    It started with Tom Cavanaugh, a New Jersey native who now lives in Los Angeles and works as a dispatcher for the Cal State Northridge police department. (You can read his story here.)

    "People calling from all over the country. It started with a 911 dispatcher from Los Angeles who said he wanted to buy 100 cups of coffee for the next hundred people who walk in," said Peter Leone, who owns the shop.

    "It's been mind blowing," he said.

    After the coffee donation, Theresa Fronheiser, of Newnam, Georgia donated a bucket full of candy. She is a registered nurse, according to her LinkedIn page.

    "It's being well received. You see they get it and they stop and then wonder why is someone from around the country giving me a donut or a cookie and then it hits them and you see that it touches them," Leone.

    Leone said this helps this devastated community begin to heal.

    "It’s definitely pushing us to move forward and this town is resilient. They're going to come out OK," Leone said.