Seymour Company Sends Help for Oil Cleanup | NBC Connecticut

Seymour Company Sends Help for Oil Cleanup



    NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of the Gulf of Mexico on April 25, 2010 using its Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. With the Mississippi Delta on the left, the silvery swirling oil slick from the April 20 explosion and subsequent sinking of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform is highly visible. The rig was located roughly 50 miles southeast of the coast of Louisiana.

    More than 1,000 miles from themassive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a Seymour company is hard at work, producing oil booms and skimmers that are being used to clean up the mess.

    "Booming the area off with floating dams to protect these areas is the best option, but the size of the spill will exhaust the world's supply of oil booms very quickly," Simon Boxall of the National Oceanography Center at Britain's University of Southampton tells Reuters.

    Lamor Slickbar is one of the companies trying to meet that demand for booms, which float on a foam core and collect oil in net just under the water's surface.

    The 50-year-old Finnish-owned company has increased shifts to manufacture more boom, Reuters reports.

    Already, the company has trucked 14,000 feet of boom from the Seymour plant to the Gulf Coast since the rig collapsed more than a week ago.

    Lamor Slickbar has placed its other locations around the world on notice to ship another 40,000 feet of boom to the Gulf if needed.

    This oil spill has the potential of affecting hundreds of species of wildlife, making it a greater disaster than the Exxon Valdez disaster in 1989.

    Lamor Slickbar also supplied booms and skimmers to the cleanup of Prince William Sound after the Valdez struck a reef.