Dodd's Popularity Plummets

People polled pick Simmons and Caligiuri, say Dodd's not trustworthy

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
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    Sen. Chris Dodd's approval is a low 33 percent.

    How low can U.S. Sen. Chris Dodd’s popularity rating go? It’s now at 33 percent, something a pollster called unheard of for a 30-year incumbent.

    And, Dodd’s trailing behind two other guys who are running against him and one who has not even announced yet.

    “A 33 percent job approval is unheard of for a 30-year incumbent, especially a Democrat in a blue state. Sen. Christopher Dodd’s numbers among Democrats are especially devastating,” Quinnipiac University Poll DirectorDouglas Schwartz said. 

    Dodd’s popularity has been hit over AIG and Countrywide Financial scandals. 

    “Since the AIG controversy, his approval rating among Democrats is down to 51 percent, and only 58 percent of Democrats say they will vote for him against Simmons, who at this point is the best known and strongest Republican challenger,” Schwartz said.
     
    The latest Quinnipiac University poll shows Dodd behind former Republican Congressman Rob Simmons by a much bigger margin than he was before Simmons announced. It shows Simmons defeating Dodd by a 50 percent to 34 percent margin.

    Dodd is also as well as state Sen. Sam Caligiuri who just entered the 2010 Senate race, 41 percent to 37 percent.

    Dodd also trails former ambassador Tom Foley, 43 percent to 35 percent, and Foley has not even entered the race.

    Of almost 2,000 registered voters, 58 percent disapprove of the job he’s doing. These are the lowest job approval numbers Dodd has gotten since the poll started.

    Connecticut voters said Dodd has strong leadership qualities, but more than half, 54-32 percent, said he is not honest and trustworthy.

     “Voters won’t vote for you if they don’t trust you. Dodd must find a way to regain the trust of Connecticut voters, and do it before a Republican challenger – and maybe a Democratic primary challenger – gains too much momentum,” Schwartz said.