Town Heals and Remembers

Song About Newtown Promotes Healing, Kindness

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    NEWSLETTERS

    How a musical duo and a Newtown organization came together to help the healing (Published Thursday, Dec 12, 2013)

    One Connecticut musical group has turned to song to help the healing in Newtown, and, in the process, is hoping to bring kindness to our nation’s kids.

    It all began with an organization called Newtown Kindness, borne out of the loss of Sandy Hook first-grader Charlotte Bacon. The group is committed to promoting acts of kindness and encouraging children to become lifelong contributors to their communities.

    The group asked The Alternate Routes to write a song for them, entitled “Nothing More.”

    “This is a simple idea," said lead singer Tim Warren. "It reaches people in the simplest way possible. It's not political. It's not about a tragedy. It's like, we are going to pick the pieces up and we are going to try and make the best of the situation, and that idea comes from people who had to overcome a lot.”

    Students from the Sunset Ridge School in East Hartford had the opportunity to sing with the band after their teacher reached out to the musical duo.

    “It really is a powerful message about how we should all be kind to each other,” said 11-year-old East Hartford student Ashya Perez.

    To that end, students at the arts-themed school have pledged to commit 26 acts of kindness in honor of the Sandy Hook shooting anniversary.

    “We expect all of our students to be kind, to be considerate role models,” said school principal Emil Kopcha.

    The mission of Newtown Kindness is spreading. Other children throughout the country are also singing this song in their classrooms to help inspire a positive school climate.

    “One thing I think I will say about children is that when they see a need, they respond to it immediately. Whereas as adults, we overthink it,” said sixth-grade teacher Cara Quinn.

    It's a simple message and the youngest among us are its messengers.

    “I really like the song. I think it's really powerful," said 11-year-old Maya Mason. "And my favorite part in it is that heroes don't look like they used to. They look like you do. I think that's trying to say that anybody can be a hero because it’s not just like Superman and Batman. It's about anybody. Just because you are being kind, you can be a hero.”