Swastika, Racist Graffiti Found on New London Sidewalk

Two civil rights groups are calling for an investigation

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A New London family is targeted with racist graffiti. Local activists want to know whats going to be done about it. (Published Friday, Oct 25, 2013)

    Two civil rights groups are calling on New London police to investigate the discovery of hate-filled graffiti outside a home on Shaw Street Friday morning.

    The graffiti contained a swastika and derogatory language towards African-Americans outside the home where a black family lives, according to the Connecticut Chapters of the NAACP and the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

    "When my aunt seen it and stuff, she was heartbroken," said Hakeem Dannett.

    Heartbroken to see the hateful graffiti in front of the home Dannett has spent his entire life. Marring the sidewalk were the words "Get a job blacks," with a swastika underneath. The family was further shocked as they discovered three more swastikas. One was on their cooler and two were spray-painted on their home. One was accompanied by the word "out."

    "As a diverse community, we stand united against any form of hate and we urge law enforcement authorities to investigate this incident, expose those behind it and find out if the family that lives in the house is in any danger," said Mongi Dhaouadi, the executive director of CAIR-CT.

    The groups discussed the incident at a news conference Friday evening.

    "This is not New London. This does not reflect New London," said New London Mayor Daryl Finizio.

    Police said this graffiti on Shaw Street was first reported on Oct. 6.

    Community activists are calling for local and possibly federal law enforcement to investigate. For nearly three weeks the family has had to face the hateful words every day.

    "For two hours trying to scrub it out just to surprise my aunt and give her something good to come home to, and I couldn't even accomplish that," said Dannett.

    Friday night two Connecticut College students who heard about the hateful scrawling brought paint and covered it up, but what was written can't be so easily forgotten.

    Community activists want to know why the graffiti remained there for weeks after it was reported with no effort by the city to clean it up.