Almost Time to Make the Maple Syrup | NBC Connecticut

Almost Time to Make the Maple Syrup

Go a little bit country, all in good taste

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    The third smallest state in the nation, Connecticut is actually one of the leaders in producing 100 percent Pure Maple Syrup. It has more than 30 sugarhouses and some produce more than 100 gallons of syrup per year.

    Imagine a world with no syrup. There would be no delightful drizzle down a stack of buttermilk pancakes or a sugary treat to fill the squares of waffles. There would be no left over pools to dip breakfast sausage or bacon and – gasp -- no reason to lick the stick off your fingers. 

      No, a world without syrup just doesn’t seem right and Connecticut is playing a huge part in making sure breakfast is always complete. 
     
    The third smallest state in the nation, Connecticut is actually one of the leaders in producing 100 percent Pure Maple Syrup. It has more than 30 sugarhouses and some produce more than 100 gallons of syrup per year. 
     
    According to the Maple Syrup Producers Association of Connecticut, Inc. these numbers depend strongly on the weather. Ideal conditions for maple production include freezing nights and warm days.
     
    This week marks the middle of sugaring season in Connecticut, which extends from early February until late March, and to celebrate the town of Hebron will be holding its 20th Annual Maple Festival. It was scheduled for March 13 and 14 but it is postponed until March 20 and 21. 

    The festival includes a weekend of maple-related events from making maple cotton candy, pancake breakfasts and demonstrations of the pure maple syrup process.

    While the maple festival is postponed, the craft fair in the fellowhship hall at Gilead Congregational Church in Hebron will gon on as planned.  
     
    Although one of the most popular events, the Hebron festival is not the only place to see how it works. Many maple producers welcome visitors throughout the sugaring season to see how sap is gathered and boiled.
     
    Learning how to make your own maple syrup could be the final touch to a truly homemade breakfast and even save you some big cash.

    The taste is worth the $60 you can spend on a 100 percent bottle of Connecticut Maple Syrup, but if you have the tree, there is no reason you can’t do it yourself.

    On March 13, Sweet Wind Farm in Granby will host its Maple Festival, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

    There is an entire Web site dedicated to Maple Syrup festivals here