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2 Killed in Small Plane Crash in N.H.

Officials confirm pilot David Ingalls and passenger Bruce Anderson were killed in the Hampton, NH crash

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Officials confirm pilot David Ingalls and one passenger were killed when a plane crashed at Hampton Airfield in North Hampton, New Hampshire. (Published Monday, Sep 1, 2014)

    Correction: In an earlier report, NECN stated that the FAA had confirmed the plane's tail number. This information actually came from NTSB.

    A plane has crashed in North Hampton, New Hampshire, killing the pilot and his passenger.

    Officials say the plane stopped only to refuel. It had taken off originally from a private airstrip in Kingston, New Hampshire.

    Police in Kingston confirmed Monday that David Ingalls, 77, a resident of that town, was operating the plane when it crashed at Hampton Airfield around 10:50 a.m. Ingalls was an Air Force Veteran and retired TWA pilot who for 30 years was on the town of Kingston Conservation Commission.

    The Cessna 180 is registered to Ingalls, according to the Federal Aviation Administration's online database.

    Tuesday, North Hampton Police confirmed the identity of the passenger as 62-year-old Bruce Anderson.

    "When I flew with Dave, he checked that little Cessna over as though it were a 747. He checked every screw on that plane before it went up and I felt very comfortable with him," said Evelyn Nathan, chair of the Kingston Conservation Commission.

    Witnesses told officials that the plane was trying to take off. It appeared to be moving normally until the nose of the plane pitched upward. They say the aircraft lost speed and dropped from the sky.

    "This was just a transient pilot that came in got gas came back out and had a really, really unfortunate accident. And everyone here is in an absolute state of shock and mourning," said witness and pilot Dana Thurston.

    New Hampshire State Police responded to the crash.

    The FAA is investigating, and the National Transportation Safety Board is working to determine the cause of the crash.

    Officials say investigators will be looking at the pilot, the weather and the plane itself during the investigation.