<![CDATA[NBC Connecticut - Connecticut Political News, NY and CT Politics, and More]]>Copyright 2016http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/politics http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC_Connecticut.png NBC Connecticut http://www.nbcconnecticut.comen-usSat, 01 Oct 2016 08:18:29 -0400Sat, 01 Oct 2016 08:18:29 -0400NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Video of Trump Deposition Released]]> Fri, 30 Sep 2016 16:32:21 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/TrumpScreenShot2.jpg

Video of Donald Trump giving a deposition in a case involving one of his hotels was released Friday. The case is part of Trump’s ongoing legal feud with celebrity chef and restauranteur Geoffrey Zakarian.

Zakarian and another chef pulled out of deals to open restaurants at a new Trump hotel in Washington, D.C., NBC News reports, after Trump’s 2015 speech in which he referred to “rapists” crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, “bringing crime” to the United States.

“All I’m doing is bringing up a statement that is very real about illegal immigration, and I think most people think I’m right,” Trump testified under oath.

He further defended his speech on-camera and objected to the chefs being “politically correct” and “grandstanding.”



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<![CDATA[Phoenix Demands Its Cops Be Removed From Trump Ad]]> Fri, 30 Sep 2016 08:19:38 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trump_chicago_2.png

Furious Phoenix officials published a letter to Donald Trump on Thursday night, demanding his campaign ad showing city police officers be taken down immediately. 

The ad, titled “Movement,” shows Trump meeting with a number of people, including police. The Phoenix cops in the promotion had no idea they were being filmed, Phoenix City Attorney Brad Holm said, NBC News reported.

Holm condemned the video, writing in the letter that the ad “unmistakably and wrongfully suggests that Phoenix and the officers support or endorse Mr. Trump’s campaign.”

While the National Fraternal Order of Police, the largest police union in the country, endorsed Trump’s campaign, it is illegal for individuals in public service positions at the local, state and federal level to engage in political activities of any kind.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[USA Today Breaks With Tradition to Oppose Trump]]> Fri, 30 Sep 2016 10:33:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/donald-trump10.jpg

For the first time in 34 years, USA Today's editorial board declared sides in a presidential race, calling Trump “unfit for the presidency,” NBC News reported. 

The board encouraged voters to “resist the siren sound of a dangerous demagogue.”

The editorial made it clear, however, that it was not endorsing Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton for president.

Other historically-conservative newspapers have denounced Trump, including The Detroit News, Arizona Republic, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Dallas Morning News and Houston Chronicle. For most, it was the first time they would not endorse the Republican nominee.

Trump blasted the papers in a Friday morning tweet: "The people are really smart in cancelling subscriptions to the Dallas & Arizona papers & now USA Today will lose readers! The people get it!"



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<![CDATA['Great Man': Obama, Clinton Pay Tribute to Shimon Peres]]> Fri, 30 Sep 2016 06:57:50 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-611524328.jpg

Former Israeli president Shimon Peres was remembered as a "great man" as scores of world leaders attended his funeral Friday, NBC News reported.

President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton were among 90 delegations from 70 countries paying their respects to Peres, who died Tuesday while hospitalized for a major stroke. He was 93.

"Even in the face of terrorist attacks, even after repeated disappointments at the negotiation table, he insisted that as human beings, Palestinians must be seen as equal in dignity to Jews and must therefore be equal in self-determination," Obama said.

Clinton said Peres was Israel's "biggest dreamer" and called him a "wise champion of our common humanity."

After the ceremony, the casket was led to the gravesite carried by eight members of an honor guard and led by soldiers carrying wreaths. Netanyahu and Obama chatted along the way, also talking with Peres' family.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Gender-Neutral Restroom Law in CA]]> Thu, 29 Sep 2016 21:44:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/GenderNeutralBathroom-AP_387290774073.jpg

California Gov. Jerry Brown waded further into the national debate over transgender rights Thursday as he signed a bill requiring that all single-stall toilets in California be designated as gender neutral.

The measure requires that businesses and governments post non-gender-specific signs on single-occupant restrooms by March 1, 2017. Democratic Assemblyman Phil Ting of San Francisco said his legislation would establish the nation's most inclusive restroom-access law and "chart a new course of equality for the nation."

"This simple concept is oddly cutting-edge when compared with the discrimination being enacted in other states," Ting said earlier, while urging the Democratic governor to sign the bill, AB1732.

One noticeable change will be signage seen outside single-stall restrooms at restaurants and other public places. Some are indifferent about the law, while others feel it's unnecessary.

"I really don’t care who uses the restroom, personally," said Veronica Murray, of Walnut Creek.

Another Walnut Creek resident, Justin Ferrara, said, "I think it’s absolutely confusing. I don’t really understand what the big deal is in the first place; leave it the way it was. I think it’s ridiculous."

Kris Hayashi, executive director of the Transgender Law Center, which co-sponsored the bill, said it's an issue of safety.

"This law is going to mean people who are transgender that don’t meet stereotypes of what a man or a woman should look like are able to use the restroom, without fear of harassment or fear of violence," Hayashi said.

Lawmakers sent the legislation to Brown in August, a day after a federal judge temporarily blocked an order by President Barack Obama requiring that public schools let students use bathrooms that correlate with their gender identity.

California students can already do so under a law Brown signed in 2013. He also approved adding gender identity to the state's antidiscrimination laws in 2011.

Supporters of the new legislation said 19 states considered restricting access to restrooms, locker rooms and other facilities based on the user's biological sex, including North Carolina, which passed a law requiring people to use restrooms based on their gender at birth.

The U.S. Supreme Court will consider reviewing whether a transgender Virginia high school senior should be permitted to use the boys restroom.

Supporters say gender-neutral restrooms also would help parents with children of a different gender and adults caring for aging parents. It would not affect restrooms that have multiple stalls.

Randy Thomasson, president of SaveCalifornia.com, a nonprofit conservative organization, pointed to potential conflicts arising from gender-neutral facilities.

"What woman wants a man poking his head in the restroom door that somehow didn't shut or lock? How many women want to use a urine-stained toilet seat?" he wrote in urging Brown to veto the bill.

He fears that what he called a "radical state takeover of the private sector's restroom policies" could affect religious schools and home businesses.

Opponents said in December that they had failed to collect enough signatures to advance a proposed ballot measure that would have asked voters to require transgender people to use the public restrooms that correspond with their biological sex.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Campaign Says Debate Two Must Be Better]]> Thu, 29 Sep 2016 07:06:00 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trump_chicago_2.png

Two days after the first presidential debate, top aides and people close to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump admit the candidate's performance was subpar and that he must dramatically improve in his second showdown against Hillary Clinton, NBC News reported.

While Trump has been actively spinning his debate performance as a win and insisting that any areas of imperfection were not his fault, his confidants were telling a different story.

The debate was a "disaster" for Trump, according to one source close to the campaign. Also dissatisfied with the debate performance were Trump's children, according to a campaign aide, who said they wish campaign leadership had forced him to take it more seriously.



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<![CDATA[Gary Johnson Can't Name His Favorite Foreign Leader]]> Thu, 29 Sep 2016 07:03:16 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Gary-Johnson-candidato-presidencial-que-es-Alepo-Siria.jpg

Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson went on the offensive over foreign policy Wednesday night, but not before drawing a blank on the names of just about every foreign leader alive today.

Even Johnson had to admit he was making a gaffe as he tried and failed to answer Chris Matthews' question on who his favorite foreign leader is, holding his head in his hand for seconds on a live episode of MSNBC's "Hardball," filmed at a town hall in the University of New Hampshire.

"I guess I'm having an Aleppo moment on the former president of Mexico," he said.

Johnson, the former governor of New Mexico, was referring to a blunder he made a few weeks ago on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," when he was asked what he would do about the situation in war-torn Aleppo in Syria.

"What is Aleppo?" he asked. Johnson later expressed frustration with himself and said, "I have to get smarter."

In Wednesday's gaffe, Johnson managed to identify "the former president of Mexico" as his favorite leader, but couldn't name which one. His running mate, ex-Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, chimed in with the name Vicente Fox, which Johnson said was correct.

Later in the Q&A, Johnson took a big swing at Hillary Clinton, saying he doesn't have confidence in her when it comes to nuclear weapons restraint.

Johnson insisted "she's gonna shoot" when Matthews asked if he thinks Clinton has a "happy trigger," going on to say he thought she would not want to be perceived as weak.

"Confronted with that 10 minutes, she's gonna be hawkish," he said.

Johnson is polling at 10 percent among likely voters, according to the latest NBC News/SurveyMonkey poll. He told Matthews he needs to start polling higher so that he'd be able to participate in the final two debates and have a shot at winning the presidency.



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<![CDATA[How Trump Fared With Women After the Debate]]> Wed, 28 Sep 2016 18:35:26 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP_16271039934629.jpg

Donald Trump's debate performance did not help his standing among among women likely to vote in the election in November, according to a new NBC NewsSurveyMoney poll taken after Monday’s debate.

NBC News reported that 27 percent of likely female voters said the debate caused them to think worse of Trump, while just 12 percent said their views on Clinton worsened. Eleven percent of women voters said their views on Trump improved while 30 percent said their views on Hillary Clinton improved.

The poll found that overall, 52 percent of likely voters who watched the debate or followed coverage on it thought Hillary Clinton won, and women named Clinton the winner of the debate by a 10-point margin over men.

"I'm undecided, but I'm leaning more towards Hillary than I ever have before because of the debate," said Joan Hume, a 71-year-old retiree from Ohio who said she voted for Trump in the primary.



Photo Credit: AP, File]]>
<![CDATA[Majority of Voters Say Clinton Won the Debate: Poll]]> Wed, 28 Sep 2016 17:43:32 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/clinton-and-trump.jpg

A majority (52 percent) of voters who followed the first presidential debate said Hillary Clinton won, according to an NBC News/Survey Monkey post-debate poll.

Twenty-one percent of those polled thought Trump was the winner, while 26 percent said neither candidate emerged victorious.

Fifty percent of Democrats said their impression of Clinton changed for the better after watching the debate. About a quarter of Republicans polled said their impression of Trump changed positively.

Thirty percent of women polled, regardless of party affiliation, said their opinion of Clinton improved after the debate, while just 11 percent of women overall said their opinion of Trump changed for the better.

The first face-off of the 2016 presidential election cycle broke debate viewership records and about three-quarters of respondents said they watched the debate live.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Feeling 'Just Fine' Despite Low-Tempo Chicago Speech]]> Wed, 28 Sep 2016 21:08:53 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trump+campaign1.png

An uncharacteristically low-tempo speech in Chicago Wednesday, paired with noticeable congestion, has fueled further questions about Trump's health following his infamous debate-night sniffles. Still, his campaign insists Trump does not have a cold and is feeling "just fine."

Trump spoke during a campaign event at the Polish National Alliance, but social media viewers were quick to point out he sounded congested, his voice scratchy during the event.

On Monday, Trump’s sniffles appeared to distract many people following along with the debate on social media and certainly did not go unnoticed, with #TrumpSniffles showing up on Twitter timelines.

Trump insisted Tuesday that he didn't have the sniffles during the debate. Asked about them in a phone interview Tuesday morning on "Fox & Friends," Trump denied there was any sniffling, said he doesn't have a cold or allergies, and blamed the microphone.

He said the microphone was very bad, "but maybe it was good enough to hear breathing. But there was no sniffles."

Trump also floated the theory that debate moderators gave him a bad microphone on purpose.

When Hillary Clinton had pneumonia about two weeks ago, it became a major question mark over her own campaign.

When video showed her appearing to stumble at a 9/11 memorial event in New York, it sparked a wave of speculation on whether she was fit enough to continue running or serve as president. (Her doctors said she was, and she returned to the trail.)

Trump's campaign did appear to make light of her absence from the campaign trail in a statement after she began campaigning: "We are pleased to disclose all of the test results which show that Mr. Trump is in excellent health, and has the stamina to endure — uninterrupted — the rigors of a punishing and unprecedented presidential campaign and, more importantly, the singularly demanding job of president of the United States."

Trump is also expected to appear at an event in suburban Bolingbrook Wednesday. Later in the day, former Chicago Bears coach Mike Ditka and Chicago Cubs co-owner Todd Ricketts are expected to attend a fundraiser for the Republican presidential nominee alongside Trump's daughter, Ivanka Trump, the Chicago Tribune reports.

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<![CDATA[Trump Tries Reframing Poor Debate Performance at Florida Rally]]> Wed, 28 Sep 2016 00:05:09 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-610601852.jpg

Donald Trump spent all of Tuesday discussing Monday night's debate, asserting that he won against Hillary Clinton, NBC News reported.

"Last night was very exciting, and nearly every single poll had us winning against Hillary Clinton, big league," he said.

Later, veering off, Trump explained away a performance even Republicans said was reactive and lacking substance as a planned strategy of "holding back."

"I didn't want to do anything to embarass her," he said.

Trump also repeated a number of falsehoods from the debate, asking the crowd: "Does everybody believe me, I was against going to Iraq?" though his initial support is well-documented; and "I explained last night stop and frisk was constitutional," he said, though it was ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge in 2013.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Clinton Wins Applause in NC for Debate Performance]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 14:29:17 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-610636870.jpg

Hillary Clinton won applause from supporters in North Carolina for her performance in Monday night's debate. 

They greeted the Democratic presidential candidate with cheers on Tuesday after Clinton asked if they saw her first face-off with Republican rival Donald Trump. 

Clinton said she was happy to have the opportunity to lay out her vision for the United States. She said she has an "old-fashioned idea that if I'm asking for your vote, to actually tell you what I want to do."

Clinton also urged supporters to register to vote. She predicted record turnout in November.

Trump briefly addressed his first faceoff with Clinton during a Tuesday afternoon appearance near Miami's Little Havana neighborhood. The audience was largely Cuban-American.

Trump described the debate as "an interesting evening" and said more than 80 million people watched it. He said he tried not to think about the large television audience.

He said, "I think we did very well." He suggested he was the winner in virtually all post-debate polls. That's despite many Republican leaders and voter surveys suggesting that Clinton came out on top.

Trump called it, "a very big moment, a very important moment."



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Most Memorable Moments From 1st General Election Debate]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 10:51:44 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/PL05Ma_1200x675_773938755547.jpg Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump squared off in the first presidential debate on Monday night. The candidates traded barbs and accusations throughout the often-tense 90 minute event at New York's Hofstra University; Clinton accused Trump of "a long record of engaging in racist behavior," referencing a justice department lawsuit accusing him of not renting apartments to African Americans. Trump mocked Clinton for her absence from the campaign trail in recent days, to which Clinton shot back that she did indeed prepare for the debate just as she has prepared to be president.]]> <![CDATA[Taliban Watches Debate From Secret Afghanistan Location]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:58:56 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP_743351664968.jpg

Taliban leaders were watching last night's debate between Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump from a secret location in Afghanistan, according to NBC News.

A spokesman for the group, Zabihullah Mujahid, told NBC that they were "very interested in watching," and they had hoped Afghanistan would have been a more prominent part of the debate.

He said that Trump is "non-serious," and said the candidate "[says] anything that comes to his tongue."

"There nothing of interest to us in the debate as both of them said little about Afghanistan and their future plans for the country," Mujahid added.



Photo Credit: AP, File]]>
<![CDATA[Obama's Hard Stance on Ketchup]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 07:05:16 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP_16145366840419.jpg

In this uncertain election season with its scandals, attacks and bald-faced lies, it’s refreshing when a politician takes a hardline stance on the world stage’s most pressing issues.

That’s exactly what President Barack Obama did when pressed by chef and television star Anthony Bourdain on how appropriate ketchup on a hot dog is.

“Is ketchup on a hot dog ever acceptable?” Bourdain asked the president on the season premiere of his television show “Parts Unknown.”

Obama’s response was a swift “No.”

Well… “It's not acceptable past the age of 8,” the president relented.

“My hot dog question might have been diplomatically problematic for a first-term president. He answered without hesitation -- like a Chicagoan,” Bourdain wrote of his recent bun cha meal with the president in Vietnam.

Bourdain also recently rattled off his favorite places to eat in Chicago during a Reddit AMAA.



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<![CDATA[The Top Trump-Clinton Debate Tweet? It's From 2012]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 23:43:18 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/610601740-hillary-clinton-donald-trump-debate-tweets.jpg

Twitter was abuzz during the presidential debate Monday, but nothing grabbed people's attention like a tweet Donald Trump sent in 2012, according to the company.

Days before that year's election, Trump tweeted that global warming was a Chinese conspiracy "to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive." It was the most retweeted tweet during the debate, according to Twitter's government and elections team.

So what made that obscure tweet rise to the top of the Twitter hive mind's consciousness? Hillary Clinton said early on in the debate that Trump called climate change a hoax, and he strongly denied it.

Twitter users, who have always jumped on candidates' statements during debates, were quick to fact check him with his own statements. That China example wasn't the only one.

Elsewhere online, Google's search data suggested that Hillary Clinton gained more visibility from the debate. The tech giant's data and visualizations lab, Google Trends, found that every state in the country was uniformly searching Clinton's name more than Trump's after the debate, where Trump had dominated beforehand.

And she dominated searches for long stretches in two key swing states: Ohio and Florida.



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<![CDATA[Clinton vs. Trump Debate: Social Media Reacts]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 06:48:50 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-610601290.jpg

The presidential nominees sparred for 99 minutes in their first presidential debate held at Hofstra University Monday night.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton tackled the economy, ISIS, taxes and the president's birth status. They also took jabs at one another, and plenty of them.

"I have a feeling by the end of this debate I'm going to be blamed for everything that's ever happened," Clinton joked.

Clinton noted that cyber security attacks were a concern, and the United States should be wary of Russia, and noted that "Donald is very praiseworthy of Vladimir Putin." 

Trump said he'd release his tax returns once Clinton provided the 33,000 emails she deleted, and that his temperment was his best asset. 

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"She doesn't have the stamina... I don't believe Hillary has the stamina" to be president, Trump said. 

The top three issues posted to Facebook by 18- to 34 year-olds during the night were ISIS, racism and discrimination and crime and criminal justice, according to Facebook. 

#TrumpSniffles began showing up on Twitter timelines in response to Trump appearing to sniffle throughout the debate. 

Social media users shared a breadth of reaction as Lester Holt of NBC News moderated the debate. 

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<![CDATA[Top Tweets on the 1st Presidential Debate]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 07:17:20 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP+-+Hofstra+Debate+16+sized.jpg

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump didn't hold back during the first debate of the 2016 general election. Because most viewers have a habit of watching through a second (and third) screen, Twitter feeds were equally intriguing. Here are some top reactions to Clinton and Trump’s grueling debate.

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<![CDATA[Fact-Checking the 1st General Election Debate]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 15:26:16 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP_16271039934629.jpg



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<![CDATA[Clinton Leads Trump by 5 Ahead of 1st Debate: Poll]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 16:15:19 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-605904136.jpg

Hillary Clinton takes a five-point lead among likely voters over Donald Trump into Monday night's presidential debate, according to the latest NBC NewsSurveyMonkey Weekly Election Tracking Poll, released hours before the debate kicked off.

Clinton's 45-40 lead over Trump was unchanged from the week before, the poll found. But Clinton's head-to-head matchup with Trump improved by two points over the previous week, and she now leads him 51-44, NBC News reported.

Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson trails the front-runners with 10 percent of those surveyed in the online poll, from September 19 through September 25. Green Party candidate Jill Stein has 3 percent support.

Clinton leads among millennials and gained ground in the 18-29 age group, where the third-party candidates maintained comparatively large bastions of support, while only 5 percent of those 65 and over support Johnson and only 1 percent support Stein.



Photo Credit: Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Debate-Day Trump Snapchat Filter Takes Swipe at Clinton]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 16:38:33 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trump-crooked-hillary-snapchat-filter.jpg

Snapchat claims it reaches 41 percent of Americans between 18 and 34 years old on any given day.

Donald Trump's presidential campaign is trying to win that group over with a new Snapchat geofilter debuted on Monday, the day of his first debate with Hillary Clinton.

The star- and firework-spangled "Debate Day" filter uses Trump's trusted epithet for Clinton, "crooked Hillary" on top, where it reads: "Donald J. Trump vs. Crooked Hillary." The national, sponsored filter was paid for by Donald J. Trump for President, Inc., according to fine print on the filter itself and confirmed by Snapachat.

Geofilters are a feature on Snapchat that lets users overlay images onto their photos or videos. They're often of city or town names, but users can design and purchase their own filters to be used in certain places for periods of time. The filters must be approved by Snapchat. 

Clinton and her allies were outspending Trump's campaign in TV ads by a 5-to-1 margin as of last week, NBC News reported. Clinton has purchased ads on Snapchat before, including during the Republican National Convention, but didn't have a Snapchat filter of her own on Monday.

The Trump campaign — which has grown in part on the strength of the candidate's Twitter presence — is no stranger to using social media to score points in the debate. Earlier this month, Donald Trump Jr. drew outrage along with retweets when he posted an image showing the internet meme Pepe the Frog, which as been used by some white nationalists, next to his father.

Watch the debate here at 9 p.m. ET.



Photo Credit: NBC ]]>
<![CDATA[Q-Poll Finds Clinton and Trump in Dead Heat]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:06:28 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/clinton-trump-split-upset1.jpg

With hours before presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump debate, Quinnipiac University in Hamden has released a poll, calling the race a virtual dead heat.

They said Clinton, a Democrat, takes 44 percent of American likely voters, while Trump, a Republican, has 43 percent, with 8 percent for Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson and 2 percent for Green Party candidate Jill Stein.

This compares to a 41 to 39 percent Clinton lead among likely voters, with Johnson at 13 percent and Stein at 4 percent, in a Sept. 14 survey.

In a head-to-head matchup, Clinton gets 47 percent to Trump's 46 percent.

Likely voters said, 41 percent to 32 percent, that Clinton will win tonight's presidential debate and 84 percent of voters said they plan to watch the highly anticipated showdown.

There is a small gender gap and a wide racial divide in the four-way likely voter matchup as Clinton leads 47 percent to 42 percent among women, while men go to Trump by a narrow 44 percent to 40 percent.

Trump leads 50 percent to 36 percent among white voters, while non-white voters back Clinton 66 percent to 24 percent.

"The race for President is a virtual tie and millions of likely voters consider the first debate must-see TV. And for those inclined to place a wager on the likely winner, Hillary Clinton is the best bet," said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll. "In this Super Bowl of American politics, the ratings will be huge and the contenders start dead even."

The debate tonight will be the first time the candidates confront each other face-to-face. 

You can watch it live on NBC Connecticut tonight. Coverage starts at 9 p.m. 

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<![CDATA[Memorable Moments From Presidential Debates Past]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 13:56:26 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/nixon-debate-P1.jpg

You can argue whether presidential debates have the power to swing an election, but they are a dependable source of images and sound bites that help color voters' perception of the candidates - for good and for bad. It began with the first televised debate between a tanned and vibrant John F. Kennedy and a peaked, flu-wracked Richard M. Nixon in 1960 and continued through 2012, when Mitt Romney's story about "binders full of women." Countless quips, gaffes and zingers have occurred in the intervening years. Here are some of the most memorable, in chronological order.

Welcome to television, Mr. Nixon

Pollsters found that people who listened to this debate on the radio thought that Nixon, the vice president, beat Kennedy. But those who followed on television, where Kennedy's youth and poise contrasted with Nixon's age and dourness, sided with Kennedy, who won the election. No single moment of this debate stands out; the entire episode illustrates how Nixon underestimated the power of television. Nixon would later run for president and win, but he refused to debate ever again.

Ford's foreign policy blunder

President Gerald Ford, who ascended to office after Nixon's resignation, was challenged by former Georgia Gov. Jimmy Carter in 1976. In this clip from the second of three debates, Ford tells an incredulous Max Frankel that "There is no Soviet domination of Eastern Europe, and there never will be under a Ford administration." Carter would later say that the debates helped him win the election.

Reagan's zingers

Carter and former California Gov. Ronald Reagan debated only once in 1980, a week before election day, and Reagan showed himself adept at two key debate techniques: affably diffusing an attack and distilling a candidacy down to a single phrase. When Carter criticized Reagan's position on Medicaid, Reagan quipped, "There you go again." And during his closing arguments, Reagan asked voters to ask themselves: "Are you better off than you were four years ago?" Both lines became classics, and Reagan won by a landslide.

Carter's Amy speech

Reagan's inspiring performance stood in stark contrast to Carter's flatness. That was exposed in his closing arguments, when he finished an argument about nuclear weapons by invoking his daughter, Amy. Some analysts point to this remark as the debate's worst.

Reagan strikes back

Reagan was challenged in 1984 by Walter Mondale, who'd served as vice president under Carter. Reagan maintained a large lead for most of the campaign. But Mondale appeared to gain ground in their first debate, when Reagan, who was, at 73, the oldest sitting president, appeared tired and a little disoriented. In the second debate, Reagan again showed his knack for amiably diffusing criticism by addressing the age issue head-on.

The rape question

The 1988 race between Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis and Vice President George H.W. Bush featured two debates, the first of which was largely uneventful. But the second began with journalist Bernard Shaw asking Dukakis if he would support the death penalty for someone who raped and killed his wife. Dukakis, a staunch opponent of capital punishment, answered resolutely that he would not, but the dryness of his response cemented the prevailing image of him as reserved and stiff. Soon after the debate, Bush began to climb in the polls.

Perot's "giant sucking sound"

The series of debates in 1992 featured three candidates: President Bush, former Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and independent candidate Ross Perot, whose campaign was fueled by anti-Washington anger. Bush and Clinton spent much of the first debate attacking each other, and voters reacted in polls by declaring Perot the winner. In the second, Perot's straight-talking, humorous delivery reached a crescendo in his opening remarks, when he went on a tirade against the North American Free Trade Agreement, predicting that it would result in a massive loss of jobs to Mexico. The line became an instant hit.

Bush checks his watch

Later in the second debate of 1992, a member of the audience stood to ask the candidates a question about how the national debt had affected them personally. From the back of the stage, Bush glanced at his watch and then botched the question, struggling to explain himself before admitting, "I'm not sure I get it." A few minutes later, Clinton gave an impassioned response, and the debate was as good as won.

Gore tries to intimidate Bush

The last of three debates between Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush in 2000 was held in a town-hall meeting style, leaving the candidates free to roam the stage while answering questions. The exchanges between Bush and Gore had become increasingly testy, with Gore at times expressing impatience with Bush's answers. That tension came to a head during Bush's attempt to explain how he thought the two men differed. Gore stood up and approached Bush in what seemed to be an effort to intimidate him. But Bush's handling of it gave him the upper hand.

McCain: “that one”

The 2008 race featured three debates between Senators Barack Obama and John McCain. In the second, a town-hall style meeting, the candidates largely refrained from attacking each other's character but parried on policy in what was generally considered a boring exchange. Perhaps that is why the Democrats and the media fixated on a slight blunder by McCain as he tried to explain the two men's differences on energy policy. Emphasizing a point, he referred to Obama as "that one," which Obama's campaign tried to exploit as evidence that McCain was out of sorts and irascible. T-shirts and Facebook pages mocking the phrase sprouted up. Pundits argued whether it was that bad of a mistake, but it became the most discussed aspect of the debate, and that wasn't good for McCain.

Romney's "binders full of women"

In in answering a question about pay equity for women, Mitt Romney said during the 2012 presidential debate that as governor of Massachusetts he made an effort to include women in his administration. He said his team reached out to several women groups to find applicants and got "binders full of women." The commentary about Romney's phrase took off online even before his second debate with President Barack Obama wrapped up. 



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Debate Details Revealed: Clinton Gets 1st Question]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 10:19:06 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/clinton-trump-texas-encuestas.jpg

WATCH the debate live at 9 p.m. ET.

Debate officials have released the details of Monday night's presidential debate between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump, NBC News reported.

Clinton will receive the first question from NBC News' Lester Holt, who will moderate the first debate of the election season at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York.

The debate will 90 minutes long and divided into six, 15 minute "pods," the Commission on Presidential Debates announced on Sunday.

Clinton's podium will be stage left and Trump's podium will be stage right, the CPD said.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA['I Hope' My Foundation Hasn't Broken the Law: Trump]]> Sun, 25 Sep 2016 20:27:02 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP_16268837219115-Trump-shrugs.jpg

When asked in an interview Sunday whether he was confident he’d followed the law with regards to his personal charitable foundation, Donald Trump said that he “hoped so.”

Media reports have found that Trump has used his charitable organization, The Donald J. Trump Foundation, for personal purchases and to pay off legal fees. Those actions may have been taken in violation of IRS laws, NBC News reports.

The host of Sunday talk show "Full Measure," Sharyl Atkinson, asked the GOP presidential candidate directly if he was “confident that the Trump Foundation has followed all charitable rules and laws.”

“Well, I hope so. I mean, my lawyers do it,” Trump said.



Photo Credit: Steve Helber, AP]]>
<![CDATA[New York Times Endorses Hillary Clinton for President]]> Sat, 24 Sep 2016 14:25:43 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/hillary-clinton-profile.jpg

The New York Times editorial board endorsed Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton Saturday, writing the endorsement is "rooted in respect for her intellect, experience, toughness and courage over a career of almost continuous public service."

The Times touted Clinton's record as first lady, New York senator and secretary of state in their endorsement, claiming she has shown the ability to work with politicians from opposing parties to enact her policy agenda.

"When Mrs. Clinton was sworn in as a senator from New York in 2001, Republican leaders warned their caucus not to do anything that might make her look good," the editorial says. "Yet as a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, she earned the respect of Republicans like Senator John McCain with her determination to master intricate military matters."

The editorial also praised her foreign policy record as secretary of state, but does mention her missteps in that role.

"As secretary of state, Mrs. Clinton was charged with repairing American credibility after eight years of the Bush administration’s unilateralism," the editorial board wrote. "She bears a share of the responsibility for the Obama administration’s foreign-policy failings, notably in Libya. But her achievements are substantial."

Clinton's ability to bounce back from her failings, however, is another one of her strengths as a politician and presidential candidate, according to the endorsement.

"She is one of the most tenacious politicians of her generation, whose willingness to study and correct course is rare in an age of unyielding partisanship. As first lady, she rebounded from professional setbacks and personal trials with astounding resilience," the editorial board wrote.

The endorsement only made passing reference to Republican nominee Donald Trump, who "discloses nothing concrete about himself or his plans while promising the moon and offering the stars on layaway," according to the Times.

The editorial board added it will publish another editorial to explain why Trump is the "worst nominee put forward by a major party in modern American history."



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[How Should Trump Debate Clinton? Advice From a Man Who Knows]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 13:53:59 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/clinton-trump-split-upset.jpg

WATCH the debate live at 9 p.m. ET.

The man famous for getting in Hillary Clinton’s face during the campaign that launched her political career has some debate advice for Donald Trump.

Stay at his lectern.

Rick Lazio should know. The former Republican congressman didn't — and paid the price for a performance that has become a textbook example of what not to do when your opponent is a woman.

Lazio, today a partner with the Jones Walker law firm, ran against Clinton in 2000 for the U.S. Senate. At their first debate in Buffalo, New York, he crossed the stage to Clinton's lectern, pointing his finger as he urged her to sign a pledge about limiting the funding of their race. He was seen as hectoring, his campaign faltered and she went on to win.

Lazio's misstep is being recalled as Clinton and Donald Trump prepare for their debate on Monday, pitting the first woman to run as a major party presidential candidate versus the former reality TV star who has made browbeating opponents a key to his success. "Little Marco," "Lyin' Ted" and "Low-energy Jeb" have given way to "Crooked Hillary," but will he fling insults at her when they meet at New York's Hofstra University? Will Clinton goad him to try to show he is not suited for the presidency?

Trump said that he would curb his disparaging tone at the debate, to be moderated by NBC News' Lester Holt. The 90-minute debate will be televised by NBC and streamed on this site at 9 p.m. ET Monday. 

"I'm going to be very respectful of her," he told Fox News' "Fox and Friends." "I think she deserves that and I'm going to be nice. And if she's respectful of me, that'll be nice."

That hasn't stopped him from mocking her on Twitter.

"Hillary is taking the day off again, she needs the rest," he tweeted Tuesday about her bout with pneumonia. "Sleep well Hillary — see you at the debate!"

For Clinton's part, she zeroed in on Trump's derisive comments when she spoke on Steve Harvey's radio show.

"I am going to do my very best to communicate as clearly and fearlessly as I can in the face of the insults and the attacks and the bullying and bigotry that we have seen coming from my opponent," Clinton said. "I can take it, Steve. I can take that kind of stuff. I have been at this, and I understand it is a contact sport."

Lazio, who said that neither Trump nor Clinton had earned his support, has several suggestions for Trump: Present a positive vision, be aware of non-verbal communication and don't go for the knock-out punch, but rather, amplify Clinton's negatives. Demonstrate enough knowledge of policy details to establish his credibility as president without trying to duel with someone who has been in and around Washington for nearly 25 years. And with nearly two-thirds of the public feeling that the country is on the wrong track, distinguish himself as the change agent and Clinton as more of the failed and uninspiring status quo.

"Have your team prepared and on high alert afterward to drive your debate message," he wrote. “There are two debates — as I well discovered — the actual event and what gets covered by the media and watched by the public afterward.

"And finally....stay at the podium!"



Photo Credit: Getty/NBC Universal
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