<![CDATA[NBC Connecticut - Connecticut Political News, NY and CT Politics, and More]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/politics http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC_Connecticut.png NBC Connecticut http://www.nbcconnecticut.comen-usSat, 21 Jan 2017 14:50:00 -0500Sat, 21 Jan 2017 14:50:00 -0500NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[From Antarctica to Europe: Women's Marches Around the World]]> Sat, 21 Jan 2017 14:48:03 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/London_England_1_March1.jpg From Antarctica to the Netherlands, global marches and protests for women's right are held around the world in solidarity with the hundreds of thousands of people gathered in Washington, D.C., as well as the 600 "sister marches" held across the United States for the Women's March on Washington. See the photos.

Photo Credit: Dan KitwoodGetty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Women's March Mosaic: Social Posts from Washington, DC]]> Sat, 21 Jan 2017 14:39:18 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/dc-social-mosaic.jpg

The day after President Donald Trump's inauguration, hundreds of thousands of people gathered in rallies and marches across the globe in support of women's rights. The largest such march was in Washington D.C., where authorities estimated 500,000 gathered. The above mosiac shows social posts from people at the march, overlaid on a photo of the crowd itself. Were you there tweeting? Use the 'Find Yourself' tool to find your post or click on the faces to see posts by others. 

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<![CDATA[Watch Women's Marches From Across the Country]]> Sat, 21 Jan 2017 12:49:06 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/214*120/marches-streams-th.jpg
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<![CDATA[Follow the Inaugural Parade in Real Time]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 14:28:58 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/ap-inaug-parade-th.jpg

Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[WhiteHouse.gov Switches Hands, Gets Trump Refresh]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:45:54 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-632199332.jpg

Many of the pages on the White House's website were taken down Friday, shortly after Donald Trump's inauguration as president, including pages on LGBTQ rights, climate change and the Affordable Care Act.

However, those pages are still accessible online. Anything that was at WhiteHouse.gov under the Obama administration has been moved to ObamaWhiteHouse.gov. The plan to do so was announced earlier in the week.

Everything on the archived version of the Obama White House page is marked as "historical material" that's "frozen in time."

The new version of WhiteHouse.gov lists Trump and Mike Pence as president and vice president, and made no mention of LGBT or climate change Friday afternoon. A new page calling for an "America first energy plan," however, was live.

"For too long, we’ve been held back by burdensome regulations on our energy industry. President Trump is committed to eliminating harmful and unnecessary policies such as the Climate Action Plan and the Waters of the U.S. rule," the new page reads

The Department of Labor's page on advancing LGBTQ rights in the work place appears to have been scrubbed from the department's website. The many pages that were once devoted to explaining and helping Americans sign up for the Affordable Care Act appear to have taken down. 

Meanwhile, the first online petition of Trump's presidency appeared on whitehouse.gov shortly after his inauguration. 

The petition calls for the White House to "Immediately release Donald Trump's full tax returns, with all information needed to verify emoluments clause compliance." 

It had received more than 2,000 signatures hours after the inauguration. 

NBC has reached out for comment to President Trump's team. 



Photo Credit: Jim Bourg/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Inaugural Words: America, Country, People, Carnage]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 13:32:11 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trump-inaug-speech-wordcloud.gif

America. Country. People. These were the most commonly used words by President Donald Trump in his inaugural address on Friday. 

Trump used either "America" or "American" 33 times in his speech, in which he spoke of the problems that have plagued the country in recent years, and promised to fix them. He said "country" 11 times and "people" 10 times. 

Those three words have been used in nearly every inaugural speech in the country's history, according to a database of the speeches compiled by the Washington Post. But Trump also had at least one unusual word choice: "Carnage." 

"But for too many of our citizens, a different reality exists: mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities; rusted out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation; an education system flush with cash, but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge; and the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential," he said.

"This American carnage stops right here and stops right now," Trump added.

According to the Post, this was the first time "carnage" was used in an inaugural address.

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<![CDATA[Inauguration Mosaic: Social Posts from the National Mall]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 13:32:27 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trump-mosaic.jpg

People from across the country gathered at the National Mall to watch the inauguration of Donald J. Trump, the 45th President of the United Stated. The above mosiac shows social posts from people watching the mosaic, overlaid on a photo of the crowd itself. Were you there tweeting? Use the 'Find Yourself' tool to find your post or click on the faces to see posts by others. 

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<![CDATA[Full Text: President Donald Trump's Inaugural Address]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 13:46:25 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-632195944.jpg

The full text of President Donald J. Trump's inaugural address, as delivered:

Chief Justice Roberts, President Carter, President Clinton, President Bush, President Obama, fellow Americans, and people of the world, thank you. We the citizens of America are now joined in a great national effort to rebuild our country and restore its promise for all of our people.

Together we will determine the course of America and the world for many, many years to come. We will face challenges, we will confront hardships. But we will ge the job done. Every four years we gather on these steps to carry out the orderly and peaceful transfer of power. And we are grateful to President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama for their gracious aid throughout this transition. They have been magnificent, thank you.

Today's ceremony, however, has very special meaning because today we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another, or from one party to another, but we are transferring power from Washington, D.C. and giving it back to you, the people.

For too long, a small group in our nation's capital has reaped the rewards of government while the people have born the cost. Washington flourished but the people did not share in its wealth. Politicians prospered, but the jobs left and the factories closed. The establishment protected itself, but not the citizens of our country. Their victories have not been your victories, their triumphs have not been your triumphs.

And while they celebrated in our nation's capital, there was little to celebrate for struggling families all across our land. That all changes starting right here, and right now. Because this moment is your moment it and it belongs to you. It belongs to everyone gathered here today and everyone watching all across America, this is your day, this is your celebration, and this-- the United States of America-- is your country.

And while they celebrated in our nation's capital, there was little to celebrate for struggling families all across our land. That all changes starting right here, and right now. Because this moment if your moment it and it belongs to you. It belongs to everyone gathered here today and everyone watching all across America, this is your day, this is your celebration, and this-- the United States of America-- is your country.

It belongs to everyone gathered here today. And everyone watching, all across America. This is your day. This is your celebration. And this, the United States of America, is your country.

What truly matters is not which party controls our government. But whether the government is controlled by the people.

January 20, 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again.

The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.

Everyone is listening to you now. You came by tens of millions to become a part of a historic movement, the likes of which the world has never seen before.

At the center of this movement is a crucial conviction, that a nation exists to serve its citizens.

Americans want great schools for their children. Safe neighborhoods for their families. And good jobs for themselves. These are just and reasonable demands of righteous people and a righteous public. But for too many of our citizens this is not a reality that exists.

Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities. Rusted out factories scattered like tomb stones across the landscape of our nation. An education system flush with cash but which leaves young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge. And the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of such much unrealized potential.

This American carnage stops right here and stops right now.

We are one nation, and their pain is our pain, their dreams are our dreams, and their success will be our success. We share one heart one home and one glorious destiny.

The oath I take today is an oath of allegiance to all Americans.

For many decades we've enriched foreign industry at the expense of American industry, subsidized the armies of other countries, while allowing for the very sad depletion of our military. We defended other nation's borders while refusing to defend our own and spent trillions and trillions of dollars overseas while America's infrastructure has fallen into disrepair and decay. We've made other countries rich while the wealth, strength and confidence our country has dissipated over the horizon.

One by one the factories shuttered and left our shores with not even a thought about the millions and millions of American workers that were left behind. The wealth of our middle class has been ripped from their homes and then redistributed all across the world, but that is past and now we are looking only to the future.

We assembled here today are issuing a new decree to be heard in every city in every foreign capital and in every hall of power. From this day forward a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward it's going to be only America first, America first.

Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families. We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our products, stealing our companies, and destroying our jobs. Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength. I will fight for you with every breathe in my body and I will never ever let you down.

America will start winning again. Winning like never before.

We will bring back our jobs, we will bring back our borders, we will bring back our wealth, and we will bring back our dreams.

We will build new roads, and highways, and bridges, and airports, and tunnels, and railways, all across our wonderful nation. We will get our people off of welfare and back to work, rebuilding our country with American hands and American labor.

We will follow two simple rules - buy American, and hire American.

We will seek friendship and good will with the nations of the world, but we do so with the understanding that it is the right of all nations to put their interests first.

We do not seek to impose our way of life on anyone. But rather, to let it shine as an example. We will shine for everyone to follow. We will reinforce old alliances and form new ones. And unite the civilized world against Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the earth.

At the bedrock of our politics will be a total allegiance to the United States of America, and through our loyalty to our country we will rediscover our loyalty to each other.When you open your heart to patriotism,  there is no room for prejudice. .

The Bible tells us how good and pleasant it is when God's people live together in unity. We must speak our minds openly debate our disagreements honestly but always pursue solidarity. When America is united, America is totally unstoppable.

There should be no fear we are protected and we will always be protected. We will be protected by the great men and woman of our military and law enforcement. And most importantly we will be protected by God.

Finally, we must think big and dream even bigger. In America we understand the nation is only living as long as it is striving. We will no longer accept politicians who are all talk and no action. Constantly complaining but never doing anything about it.

The time for empty talk is over. Now arrives the hour for action. Do not allow anyone to tell you that it cannot be done. No challenge can match the heart and fight and spirit of America. We will not fail. Our country will thrive and prosper again. We stand at the birth of a new millennium ready to unlock the mysteries of space to free the earth from the miseries of disease and to harness the energies, industries, and technologies of tomorrow. A new national pride will stir our souls, lift our sights, and heal our divisions. It's time to remember that old wisdom, our soldiers will never forget, that whether we are black or brown or white, we all bleed the same red blood of patriots.

We all salute the same great American flag — and whether a child is born in the urban sprawl of Detroit or the wind swept planes of Nebraska, they look up at the same night sky, they fill their heart with the same dreams, and they are infused with the breathe of life by the same almighty creator.

So to all Americans in every city near and far, small and large, from mountain to mountain, from ocean to ocean, hear these words: You will never be ignored again. Your voice, your hopes, and your dreams will define our American destiny and your courage and goodness and love will forever guide us along the way.

Together, we will make America strong again. We will make America wealthy again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again, and yes, together, we will make America great again. Thank you. God bless you, and God bless America.



Photo Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Obama's Final Moments in the Oval Office]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 11:44:39 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Obama_Oval_Final_Getty.jpg Watch some of President Obama’s final moments in the Oval Office as he leaves a letter for President-elect Donald Trump on the desk.

Photo Credit: White House Pool]]>
<![CDATA[CT Residents Head to DC for Trump Inauguration]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 08:34:50 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/186*120/GettyImages-632002110+%281%29.jpg

Many people from Connecticut are heading to Washington, DC to be there for Donald Trump’s inauguration today as he is sworn in as the 45th president while others are making the trip to protest. 

George Noujain, of Waterbury, said he met the president-elect when Trump came to Connecticut during his campaign and is looking forward to being in Washington to welcome the new administration. 

“It’s still surreal to me, especially knowing in 24 hours I’m going to be standing there with millions of people,” Noujain, who has amassed a large collection of Trump memorabilia, said Thursday. 

Iv Staklo is a member of a group of about 50 people who headed from New Haven with the Answer Coalition to be part of a massive demonstration in Washington, DC today. 

“We are prepared to organize nationally, locally, in our communities against any attacks that might come from the Trump administration,” Staklo said. 

Many will be watching here in Connecticut too.

The state Republican Party is holding an inauguration watch party at the Hartford headquarters at 31 Pratt St. from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Donald Trump Is Getting the Nuclear Football]]> Thu, 19 Jan 2017 19:36:20 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trumGettyImages-632105686.jpg

Sometime before he's sworn in Friday, President-elect Donald Trump will sit down with the top military officers who control America's massive military arsenal and get "THE Briefing," the one that provides him with an understanding — and the tools — of how he would wage nuclear war.

According to those who have witnessed it previously, the briefing is both daunting and sobering, NBC News reported.

Trump will take control of more than 4,000 nuclear warheads.

The options for nuclear war, called courses of action, are contained in both the "Presidential Decision Handbook" which is handed off, as well as in other more detailed briefings that Trump will receive after the inauguration.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Over 600 Sister Marches Join Women's March on Washington]]> Thu, 19 Jan 2017 16:11:22 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/marches-map-th.jpg
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<![CDATA[The Perks of Donating to Trump's Inauguration]]> Thu, 19 Jan 2017 16:09:57 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP_17013713721598-Trump-head.jpg

How much is lunch with members of Donald Trump's cabinet and House and Senate leadership worth?

According to the Presidential Inaugural Committee, a cool $1 million.

In addition to four tickets to what's billed as an exclusive "leadership luncheon" for anyone who can part with that kind of cash in support of Trump's inaugural festivities, those donors will also enjoy the perks available to other levels of sponsorship, according to a document detailing the "58th Presidential Inaugural Committee Underwriter Benefits."

Those perks include a luncheon with "the ladies of the first families," an "intimate dinner" with Vice President-elect Mike Pence and his wife, Karen, and a "candlelight dinner" with "special appearances" by Trump, Pence and their wives, according to NBC News.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Why Kanye Isn't in Inauguration]]> Thu, 19 Jan 2017 15:06:50 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trump+kanye.png

Despite being famous friends, President-elect Donald Trump’s team passed on considering Kanye West as a performer for his inauguration Friday.

Tom Barrack, the chair of Trump’s Presidential Inaugural Committee, told CNN's Erin Burnett on Wednesday that the controversial hip-hop mogul was not the right fit for such an event. 

"He considers himself a friend of the president-elect, but it's not the venue,” Barrack told CNN. “The venue we have for entertainment is filled out, it's perfect, it's going to be typically and traditionally American."

Country music star Toby Keith, actor Jon Voight and rock band 3 Doors Down are among the “traditionally American” entertainers slated to perform. Several prominent artists had publicly declined to participate in Trump's inauguration festivities.

“Kanye is a great guy but we just haven't asked him to perform,” Barrack said in his interview with CNN. “We move on with our agenda."

Military bands will also participate, and a fireworks show will follow the "Welcome Celebration."

Trump and West made headlines in December for what many perceived to be an unusual friendship after being photographed together. West was one of several black celebrities Trump met with to talk about issues facing inner city African-Americans.

West refused to comment with reporters after the meeting, instead saying only "I just want to take a picture right now" as he posed for pictures with Trump.

Trump said the two were meeting as "just friends" and were talking about "life."

"He's doing well, he's a good man," he said. 

Trump added, "we've been friends for a long time." 

West announced last year at the Video Music Awards that he would run for president in 2020. That means he would face Trump if the president-elect seeks a second term. After meeting with Trump, West hashtagged a tweet #2024, the first time someone would be able to run for president outside of a possible two-term Trump presidency.



Photo Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA['Pussyhat Project' Founders Talk Pink Hats to Protest Trump]]> Thu, 19 Jan 2017 05:04:08 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Pussyhat_Project_Trump_Inauguration_1200x675_857874499624.jpg Activists from Southern California founded what they call the Pussyhat Project – a symbolic rebuke of the infamous remarks made by President-elect Donald Trump. They plan to take their knitted hats on a march in protest of Trump’s inauguration. Michael Brownlee reports for the NBC4 News on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. ]]> <![CDATA[Michelle Obama Says Goodbye to 'People's House' in Video]]> Thu, 19 Jan 2017 11:31:39 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP_16334714356686.jpg

The boxes are taped, the moving vans are filling up and the staffers have said their goodbyes. On Friday, the first family will move out of the house they’ve called home since 2009. But before they turn over the keys, matriarch Michelle Obama took one last walk through the White House — for the whole world to see.

On Wednesday, the first lady posted a short video of her stroll on Twitter. In the clip, she was accompanied by the beloved family dogs Bo and Sunny.

Wearing chic black pumps, black pants and a bell sleeve blouse, Obama walks slowly through the halls, no doubt taking in all the memories she’s made during her husband’s two terms. 

The Obamas are headed to a 8,200-square-foot home in the Kalorama neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

But before they settle into their new residence, the soon-to-be-former president is taking his wife and children on a relaxing vacation in warm Palm Springs, California — likely a nice respite from the demands of the last eight years.



Photo Credit: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik
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<![CDATA[Hillary Clinton Would Beat de Blasio for NYC Mayor: Poll]]> Wed, 18 Jan 2017 18:29:53 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/de+blasio+clinton.jpg

Hillary Clinton would crush New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio in a head-to-head matchup if she ran as an independent, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll released on Wednesday.

Clinton would beat De Blasio 49 percent to 30 percent, with overwhelming support among Democrats and independents, the poll said. The mayor would beat the former Democratic candidate for president by 10 points among Republicans.

Earlier this month, speculation popped up that Clinton could consider challenging de Blasio this fall. While widespread media reports say she almost certainly will not run, the poll makes clear she would win virtually every age, gender, geographic and ethnic group by significant margins if she did.

"New Yorkers aren't in love with Mayor Bill de Blasio, but they seem to like him better than other possible choices - except Hillary Clinton, who probably is an impossible choice," said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, in a release. 

De Blasio was Clinton's campaign manager during her successful 2000 Senate bid. But he initially delayed endorsing her, finally doing so six months after she announced her campaign.

Clinton's strength notwithstanding, in a series of hypothetical matchups De Blasio would easily win a Democratic primary for mayor against the most commonly discussed candidates, including former City Council Speaker Christine Quinn and Comptroller Scott Stringer.

He would also win, albeit with smaller margins, against any of those same candidates running as independents. 

The phone poll of 1,138 New York City voters was conducted Jan. 11-17 and has a margin of error of 2.9 percentage points. 



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Scores of US Lawmakers to Boycott Trump Inauguration]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:06:21 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/180*120/AP_17011739079713.jpg More than 40 Democratic representatives of Congress from across the country have announced plans to boycott Donald Trump's inauguration on Jan. 20, 2017.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Presidential Children: Post-White House Years ]]> Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:56:45 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/180*120/HarrySTruman.jpg The sons and daughters of United States presidents, most of whom were children and teenagers when they followed their parents into the White House, each made a life for themselves away from the shadow of their famous fathers. See how the former first children lived post-White House.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[A History of the Presidential Inaugural Procession]]> Wed, 18 Jan 2017 11:53:29 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Clinton---1993-Inauguration-USSS-0001.jpg From the horse and buggy to reinforced limousines, see the century-long history of Secret Service agents - and their rides - at the side of newly elected presidents from Theodore Roosevelt to Barack Obama. ]]> <![CDATA[Why Obamacare Name May Have Done More Harm Than Good]]> Wed, 18 Jan 2017 07:16:02 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Obamacare-501447632.jpg

Obamacare was such a catchy nickname for the 2010 healthcare reform law. Even President Barack Obama himself embraced it when his Republican enemies coined the term.

But it may have done more harm than good for Obama's signature policy, now in the process of being repealed. Obamacare provided an easy scapegoat for people suffering problems in a health care system that was a mess long before the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act passed Congress in 2009 without a single Republican vote, NBC News reported.

Liz Hamel, who directs polling for the independent Kaiser Family Foundation, found the name does tend to polarize people. “There is some evidence there that, to a certain extent, views on Obamacare are a proxy for views on Obama," Hamel told NBC News.

"When we said 'health reform law' they said they don't know how they feel about it. When we said Obamacare, people more easily split into pro- and con- camps," she added.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Voices From Inauguration Weekend: Who Is Going to DC and Why]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:01:12 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/congress-prep.jpg

Donald Trump will be sworn in as the country's 45th president on Friday and thousands of his supporters from across the country will attend to witness the historic event. They hope his presidency will be the start of an American revival that will bring greater prosperity to the country.

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The next day thousands of women, many dismayed by the president-elect's crude references to them and his embrace of policies they believe will hurt them and their families, will march in the capital. Many will wear pink hats with cat ears, in a reference to Trump's now famous statement that he could grab women "by the pussy."

Hear from some of those planning to attend.

Voices of men and women headed to D.C. for Trump's inauguration:

David J. Pelto Jr.
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Pelto Jr., 35, will attend the inauguration with his two sons to witness history and what he called the return of "common sense" to the White House. For Pelto, who owns a truck and hauls oil, taxes are an enormous issue. At one point he owned several trucks until a drop in oil prices, and his business was further hurt by employment taxes he had to pay for drivers who worked for him, he said. "It costs on average 15 percent on top of an employee's wage," he said. "Depending on the state it can go much higher." Pelto, who lives in Arkansas, said that he hoped that entrepreneurs would benefit from the $1 trillion that President-elect Donald Trump has proposed spending on infrastructure. Pelto, who describes himself as fiscally conservative and socially liberal, also thinks the country should be less resistant to fracking. The increase in earthquakes in Oklahoma, which has been linked to wastewater disposal wells, do worry him, but he believes fracking is safe elsewhere. As far as green energy, "Why don't we allow what we have now to continue working for us while we grow slowly into green energy?"


Myke Shelby

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Myke Shelby, the owner of the San Diego Harley-Davidson dealership, which has about 150 employees, is in Washington as part of the Bikers for Trump. He flew to Washington, but was with other bikers protecting Donald Trump supporters headed to the DeploraBall from protesters. The event was named after Hillary Clinton's "basket of deplorables" comment. "I'm a veteran. I fought for their right to protest. Don't get me wrong. This country was born in a revolutionary war," said Shelby, 72. "But they don't have the right to be violent and to threaten harm." For Shelby, regulations are a key issue — ones covering the environment and labor and those from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). "Regulations, they stifle business, but they catch us when we're not looking and we end up with big fines and big legal fees," he said. OSHA regulations might have made sense when the administration was created, but they no longer protect workers the way they were meant to, he said. "It's gotten to be an overbearing bureaucracy that forces us to do things that really don't make a lot of sense," he said. Shelby said he became a Trump supporter when he heard the President-elect talk about onerous regulations. "I said 'Hello,'" he said. "Hallelujah, somebody gets it because I don't think too many politicians ever understood that."


John Hikel

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Hikel, 58, a former New Hampshire legislator and the longtime owner of an auto-repair business in Manchester, said he had supported Donald Trump since meeting him three months before the president-elect decided to run. "He had never been elected to an elected office before and he wasn't an attorney and that was my minimum," Hikel said. He said he wanted to see fewer regulations from the Environmental Protection Agency and the IRS, among agencies, particularly those governing clean air, which he said he thought were too stringent. "When Mr. Trump talked to me about trimming all of these agencies, I couldn't agree more," he said. Hikel said he was looking forward to a manufacturing revival under Trump, whom he viewed as a strong-willed leader. "More and more (customers) are coming into my shop not being able to spend $100 or $200 or $300 even to fix their vehicles," he said. "People are living paycheck to paycheck. I know they have for a long time but that's a problem that our government has handed down to us."


Erin Sullivan
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Sullivan, 20, a junior at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, voted for the first time in November and she picked President-elect Donald Trump. The country needs a revival, and Trump's tax and immigration policies and his ideas for creating more jobs in America will help rebuild the country, Sullivan said. An example: his urging automobile manufacturers to build cars in the United States and not in Mexico or elsewhere, she said. "Trump is really focusing on the American dream, and looking at the people who worked really hard and sometimes don't necessarily have a voice," she said. As a young woman, she found his lewd comment about grabbing women to be disgusting, but thought everyone at some point was bound to say something stupid. In his favor, Trump hired women for spots in his campaign, among them SMU alumna Hope Hicks as his director of strategic communications, she said. Sullivan, who is from Wilton, Connecticut, will attend the inauguration with other students from SMU and will volunteer at the Texas State Society's Black Tie and Boots Ball.


Austin Yang
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Yang, 14, a student at La Jolla Country Day School in La Jolla, California, will attend the inauguration with a group of schoolmates. "It's such an important event in our American government," he said. Too young to vote, Yang nonetheless had a preferred candidate, Donald Trump. "We thought that Trump would be better toward the Chinese," said Yang, whose mother was born in China. Trump instead threatened a trade war with China over the value of its currency. "The exact opposite of what we thought would happen," Yang said. "I'm not very happy with it but I guess we can only deal with it now since he's our president." Yang, who expects to study medicine, remains hopeful that Trump will moderate his views once he meets with Chinese officials.


Joseph Locke
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Locke, 21, works in construction, attends Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts full time and will soon start classes at the Massachusetts state reserve police academy with the goal of joining a town police force. He believes that Trump will ensure the military is better prepared to defend the country and cut back spending to tackle the country's debt. "Seeing it from a businessman's perspective where you can see where you can make cuts and not have detriment to the country," he said. Locke ran a Trump campaign office in his hometown Easton, Massachusetts, where he organized volunteers making phone calls and as part of the Bridgewater State University's College Republicans, he reached out to college students. "He didn't seem just like a regular politician," he said of Trump. "I like that he actually says what he feels and what he thinks."


The day after Trump's inauguration, thousands of women are expected on the Mall for the Women's March on Washington. 

Voices of women headed to D.C. for the women's march:

Krista Suh
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When Krista Suh, one of the originators of "The Pussyhat Project" steps out for the Women's March on Washington on Saturday, she will likely be surrounded by the handiwork of women from across the country: pink cat-eared hats, a rebuke to Donald Trump over his comment that he grabs women "by the pussy." Women from coast to coast knitted hats for themselves, friends and neighbors and sent them to Washington for other women to wear, even if they cannot be there. "But it’s about so much more than Trump using the word," Suh, 29, said. "It's about us reclaiming the word." She said that she had always been ambitious about the project, which she began with her friend Jayna Zweiman, but was taken aback by the feelings it sparked.

"I just wasn’t prepared for the emotional depth of this project — the notes that accompanied the hats have made me cry and the people who have reached out to me saying that this project has lifted them out of the grief and depression," she said. "That I didn't anticipate and that's been really humbling." Suh, a screenwriter who lives in Los Angeles, knew the minute she heard about the Women's March that she would attend and quickly thought about what sign could she hold up or what could she wear. "Honestly I was willing to strip naked for this," she said. But then she considered Washington's colder temperatures and settled on a hat — the cat ears to give it a distinctive silhouette. Her knitting teacher named it with her comment: "It's the pussy power hat."


Kica Matos

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Matos, 50, plans join the Women’s March on Washington the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration to show her 11-year-old son what is possible in a democracy. A former deputy mayor in New Haven, Connecticut, she wants to impress on him that he should be an engaged citizen, that he can participate in peaceful protests and fight for what he believes in. Matos, the director of immigration at The Center for Community Change in Washington, D.C.,  said she feared that Trump's election would undermine advances made in racial justice, immigrant rights and women's rights. His campaign, with attacks on immigrants, Muslims and people of color, brought out the worst in many Americans, she said. Of her son, she said, "I want him to believe that we are better as Americans and that we should always strive for a world that respects others, regardless of difference," she said. "And to me this march, the idea of women from all walks of life coming together in solidarity and in support of a better, more just world is incredibly appealing."


Laura Noe
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Noe, 50, will participate in the Women's March on Washington, the first she has ever gone to, because she believes the country must re-think its values. Americans are becoming insulated and isolated, mean and judgmental and are losing the ability to empathize with others, she said. "It becomes an us and them, black and white, win lose," she said. After her divorce, she sold her home so that she and her son could travel and see first-hand how other people lived. "We're all about our stuff, buying and buying, consuming and gobbling up," she said. "I decided I wanted to spend my time and money on experiences." Noe, who owns a marketing and communications company in Branford, Connecticut, wrote about their trips to France, the Czech Republic, Morocco and Turkey in "Travels With My Son: Journeys of the Heart." She is now writing about her brother, Ed, who became homeless, was diagnosed with mental illness and after many years is getting treatment. They celebrated Thanksgiving together for the first time in 17 years.


Chloe Wagner, Morenike Fabiyi
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Wagner and Fabiyi, both 16 and juniors at Francis W. Parker High School in Chicago, worked with the Illinois chapter of the Women's March on Washington and Chicago Women Take Action to put together a group of teenagers from their school to attend the march. They call their organization the Illinois Youth Chapter. Wagner is particularly concerned with LGBTQ rights and reproductive rights; Fabiyi is focused on immigration rights and education reform. Wagner said that after Trump's win, she at first felt powerless. "There wasn't anything happening for a few days and then all of a sudden we just came back full force and that's when we really starting getting passionate about bringing Illinois Youth to Washington," she said. Fabiyi said that she also felt lost but quickly realized that she needed to do something. "I can't just be mad and sad and complain about it all the time," she said. Wagner said one of the goals of the march was to tell the Trump administration that "we will not be walked over, and we will fight for all rights we are given under the Constitution." Said Fabiyi, "Just because I can't vote yet doesn't mean that my voice shouldn't be heard."


Alexandra Goutnova
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Goutnova, 15 and a student at La Jolla Country Day School in California, will be attending both the inauguration and the Women's March on Washington though she does not support President-elect Donald Trump. "I'm very passionate about women's rights," she said. Goutnova, who moved to the United States from Russia three years ago and who plans to attend law school, is bothered by comments Trump has made about women and by his denial of climate change. "It is a proven scientific fact that this is happening and this is happening right now," she said. "So the fact that our president is not willing to deal with it I think is absurd." Americans compared to Russians are more accepting, about LGBTQ rights, for example, she said. She said she is terrified that the United States will change. "Coming from Russia, I've seen the difference of how it can be in a bad way," she said. "And I'm just scared to see that happen to the U.S."



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[New Polls Find Most Americans Sour on Trump's Transition]]> Tue, 17 Jan 2017 17:40:06 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/AP_17013713721598-Trump-head.jpg

New polling shows that the majority of Americans disapprove of the way President-elect Donald Trump is handling his transition into power, with less than a week to go until his inauguration.

Just 40 percent of respondents approve of how Trump is handling his transition, according to two polls released Tuesday. The CNN/ORC poll found that 52 percent disapprove, while the Washington Post/ABC put that mark at 54 percent. 

In an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released late Tuesday, a majority of Americans — 52 percent — say they disapprove of the way Trump has handled his transition and preparations for the presidency, versus just 44 percent who approve, which is down six points from only a month ago.

A poll released last week from Gallup had similar results, finding Trump has a 51 percent disapproval rating and a 44 percent approval rating for how his presidential transition has been handled. 

Trump responded to the polling data Tuesday morning in a tweet, calling them as rigged as he claimed the polls were against him ahead of the presidential election.

"The same people who did the phony election polls, and were so wrong, are now doing approval rating polls. They are rigged just like before," Trump said.

Most polling ahead of the presidential election gave Democrat Hillary Clinton an advantage of several points. While she lost the election by 72 electoral votes, she won the popular vote by more than two percent. 

Trump's transition approval is falling, according to two of the three polls, which have a margin of sampling error between 3 and 4 percent.

The CNN/ORC poll found slightly more people approved of how he is handling the transition in November, by 46 to 45 percent. Gallup found a toss-up in December, with 48 percent approving and disapproving of how he was handling the transition. 

Outgoing president Barack Obama had much higher approval ratings than Trump in polls asking the same question in the first weeks of 2009: 80 percent or higher in all three polls. 

But there is good news for Trump in the polling data as well. While 54 percent of people had an unfavorable impression of Trump, compared to 40 percent favorable, in the Washington Post/ABC poll, 59 percent think he'll do a good or excellent job creating jobs in America. He's also in the green when asked about how he'll do helping the middle class, handling the budget deficit and dealing with the threat of terrorism.  



Photo Credit: AP]]>