Trump Says Paris Attack Will Help Le Pen in Election - NBC Connecticut

Trump Says Paris Attack Will Help Le Pen in Election

The outcome of France's presidential election is being closely watched for signs that Europe is moving toward nationalist candidates who advocate the European Union's dissolution

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    President Donald Trump offered condolences to France at a joint press conference with the Italian premier shortly after an attack shot and wounded three police officers near Paris' iconic Champs-Elysees. One officer was fatally shot. ISIS has since claimed responsibility for the attack. (Published Thursday, April 20, 2017)

    President Donald Trump waded into France's upcoming elections Friday, saying he believes an attack on police officers this week will help Marine Le Pen, the far-right presidential candidate.

    In an interview with The Associated Press, Trump said that while he is not explicitly endorsing Le Pen, the attack played to her strengths.

    "She's the strongest on borders, and she's the strongest on what's been going on in France," Trump said in the Oval Office interview. "Whoever is the toughest on radical Islamic terrorism, and whoever is the toughest at the borders, will do well in the election."

    U.S. presidents typically avoid weighing in on specific candidates running in overseas elections. But Trump suggested his opinion was no different from an average observer, saying, "Everybody is making predictions on who is going to win. I'm no different than you."

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    Sunday's vote is the first round in the French elections, with the top two candidates advancing to a winner-takes-all runoff on May 7. The high-stakes contest is viewed as something of a vote on the future of the European Union, with Le Pen calling for a referendum on France's membership in the bloc.

    Le Pen has also echoed some of Trump's hard-line rhetoric on immigration, calling for hardening French borders to stanch what she describes as an out-of-control flow of immigrants.

    She has spoken of radical Muslims trying to supplant France's Judeo-Christian heritage and, among other measures, has called for foreigners suspected of extremism to be expelled from the country.

    Le Pen, a 48-year-old mother of three, has distanced herself from her father, National Front party founder Jean-Marie Le Pen, who has been convicted of crimes related to anti-Semitism and mocked the Holocaust as a "detail" of history.

    Nevertheless, earlier this month she denied the French state was responsible for the roundup of Jews during World War II, drawing condemnation from other presidential candidates and Israel's Foreign Ministry. And her inner circle still includes old friends from her student days in Paris who were members of a radical group known for violence and anti-Semitism.

    Former President Barack Obama has also gotten involved in France's election, offering centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron his best wishes in a phone call Thursday, though he, too, stopped short of a full endorsement.

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    Macron's team released a video recording of the call, a highly unusual move as conversations among different countries' politicians are usually kept private.

    A victory for Macron would be a vote of confidence in France staying in the EU. Obama, when he was in office, encouraged Britain not to leave, though it ultimately voted to do so anyway.

    Trump backed Britain's decision to exit from the EU and has also predicted that other countries would make similar decisions. Yet during a White House news conference Thursday, the president said he believed in a strong Europe.

    "A strong Europe is very, very important to me as president of the United States," he said.