<![CDATA[NBC Connecticut - Connecticut Weather News and Coverage]]> Copyright 2015 http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/weather/stories http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC_Connecticut.png NBC Connecticut http://www.nbcconnecticut.com en-us Sat, 30 May 2015 00:23:38 -0400 Sat, 30 May 2015 00:23:38 -0400 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Today's Forecast]]> Fri, 29 May 2015 15:52:39 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/first+alert_weather+1200.jpg

FIRST ALERT FORECAST

Tonight: Fair with low clouds developing. Lows near 60.

Saturday:Becoming partly sunny (clouds may linger longer at the shore). Highs in the 80s, cooler at the beaches.

Sunday: Cloudy with a chance of showers, especially during the afternoon. Cooler with highs in the 60s.

Monday:  Cloudy with periods of rain, some locally heavy.  Cool with highs in the 60s.

Follow me on twitter: @DARRENSWEENEY



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[Download the NBC Connecticut Weather App]]> Wed, 26 Nov 2014 07:58:58 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/NBCCTWEATHERAPP043013.jpg

 

The most accurate weather information in Connecticut is now available whenever and wherever you want it.

The NBC Connecticut weather app is available for download for iPhone, iPad and Android and it's free!

All you have to do is search NBC Connecticut or Connecticut weather in the App Store or in Google Play.

You can keep NBC Connecticut's powerful radar at your fingertips and even zoom in and out on your neighborhood.

Select to receive push notifications and you'll know when severe weather is moving your way.

Plus, the NBC Connecticut weather app provides hourly, daily and 10-day forecasts. You can even pinpoint your location via GPS for precise conditions near you.

Download and rate the NBC Connecticut Weather app today!

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<![CDATA[Northeast Weekend Beach Forecast]]> Fri, 29 May 2015 19:17:15 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/beach15.jpg

A slow-moving cold front will enter the region this weekend, and that means it will be tough to find a great beach day. Saturday looks like the better of the two weekend days, though it won’t be perfect. The Jersey Shore should feature the best weather, as it will take the front longest to reach that stretch of coastline. Even there, showers will move in later Sunday.

Long Island Sound

Saturday: Lots of clouds, some sun. Low clouds and fog may linger throughout the day in eastern areas, like Groton and Stonington. Best chance for a nice day is in western areas. Temperatures will generally be in the upper-70s with a breeze off the water.
Sunday: Clouds and showers. Heaviest showers occur in the afternoon. Not a good day. Temperatures stuck in the 60s!

Cape Cod

Saturday: Lots of clouds, some sun. Low clouds and fog may linger throughout the day right along the water, with more sun inland. Temperatures will be in the lower-70s with a breeze off the water. Sunday: Showers. Not pleasant. Temperatures remain in the 60s.

Jersey Shore

Saturday: Lots of clouds, some sun. Low clouds and fog may linger throughout the day right along the water, with more sun inland. Temperatures will be in the mid-70s.
Sunday: Really looking to hit the beach Sunday? Head south to the Jersey Shore, which stands the better chance of remaining dry early in the day, though clouds will be on the increase and showers will threaten late.

Coastal Maine

Saturday: Lots of clouds, some sun. Low clouds and fog may linger throughout the day right along the water, with more sun inland. Temperatures will be in the 70s with a breeze off the water. Water temperature is still in the upper-40s and lower-50s!
Sunday: Cloudy with showers. Temperatures in the 70s.

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<![CDATA[A Split Weekend of Weather]]> Fri, 29 May 2015 13:01:05 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Warn+and+breezy+Saturday.jpg

Today looks splendid, with mostly sunny skies! Not only will there be a break from the threat of showers and thunderstorms, but the humidity will also be gone for the day. Temperatures will be in the low-80s inland, upper-70s at the shore.

Increasing clouds, breezy and warm conditions are anticipated on Saturday with temperatures in the middle-80s and Saturday is the pick of the weekend!

A cold front comes through on Sunday. It looks like clouds will hang tough all day long and on-and-off showers will make for a damp end to the weekend.

The front stalls to the south of the region on Monday and Tuesday, but not far enough away to make for nice weather. Each day will feature a good amount of clouds and the chance for a shower, especially along the shoreline. Temperatures will be stuck in the 60s.

Wednesday and Thursday will be downright spring-like, with temperatures in the 70s and tons of sunshine. Dew points will be in the 40s and 50s, meaning there won’t be any humidity whatsoever!
Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Drier Air Moves in for Friday]]> Thu, 28 May 2015 19:09:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/fridaytemps052915.jpg

Scattered showers and storms moved across the state on Thursday, without causing widespread damage. Some locations picked up much-needed rainfall.

A cold front will push through the state Thursday evening, and usher in much drier air.
Friday looks splendid, with mostly sunny skies. Not only will there be a break from the threat of showers and thunderstorms, but the humidity will also be gone for the day.
Temperatures will be in the low 80s inland, upper 70s by the shoreline on Friday.

Increasing clouds, breezy and warm conditions are anticipated on Saturday with temperatures in the middle 80s.

A cold front comes through Sunday, and it looks like clouds will hang tough all day long. On-and-off showers will make for a damp end to the weekend.
The front stalls to the south of the region Monday and Tuesday, but not far enough away to make for nice weather. Each day will feature a good amount of clouds and the chance for a shower, especially along the shoreline. Temperatures will be stuck in the 60s.

Wednesday and Thursday will be downright spring-like, with temperatures in the 70s and tons of sunshine and low humidity.



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[Strong Storms Move Through State]]> Thu, 28 May 2015 18:59:42 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/2+p.m.+Thursday+radarT+1200.jpg

Severe thunderstorm warnings and watches expired in Connecticut Thursday evening.

A few strong storm cells moved through Fairfield and New Haven counties producing high winds, frequent lightning and even some hail.

Clouds hung tough through the morning hours in southern areas and the Connecticut River Valley and this might help to tame the thunderstorm cells in these areas. Any rain is much-needed, and some areas could certainly see a quick dose of rain this afternoon. The activity should wind down by 8 p.m.

A cold front will push through the state this evening, and usher in much drier air. Temperatures will fall into the 50s as high pressure builds down from Canada. A great night to sleep with the windows open!

Friday looks splendid, with mostly sunny skies! Not only will there be a break from the threat of showers and thunderstorms, but the humidity will also be gone for the day. Temperatures will be in the low 80s inland, upper 70s at the water.

At this point, the weekend looks split. A strong cold front will come through on Sunday. That means increasing clouds, breezy and warm conditions on Saturday with temperatures in the middle-80s. A pop-up shower can’t be ruled out, but the vast majority of the rain and possibly thunder will occur on Sunday.

Early indications for the start of next week show high pressure building down from Canada, meaning much cooler conditions.

Temperatures will be stuck in the 60s and there is the chance for showers on both Monday and Tuesday, especially in southern areas, as a frontal boundary will be stalled to the south.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.


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<![CDATA[NOAA Releases Seasonal Hurricane Forecast]]> Wed, 27 May 2015 15:51:26 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/hurricane+generic.jpg

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association has released its annual hurricane season forecast for the Atlantic, and it calls for below average activity. But that doesn’t mean Connecticut is in the clear.

Government forecasters call for a total of six to 11 named storms, three to six hurricanes and zero to two major hurricanes. This forecast falls well below the 1981-2010 average. On average, there are 12 named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes.

Scientists at Colorado State University also release a seasonal hurricane forecast. William Gray and Philip Klotzbach are predicting seven named storms, three hurricanes and one major hurricane according to their forecast released in early April. They will release an update on June 1.

The best forecasts agree: activity will be below average. That may be good and bad news – good simply because it’s less tropical activity, and bad because some people may let their guard down.

It’s important to note: no long-range forecast can predict how many storms will actually make landfall. Of course, those are the storms that cause damage and make headlines.

"In our area, in Connecticut, in only takes one bad storm to create a disaster," said Old Saybrook Police Chief Michael Spera, who also serves as the town’s emergency management director and vice president of the Connecticut Emergency Management Association.

Spera recommends staying in tune with local officials and broadcasters when a tropical system threatens. As far as physical property and documents go, "everyone should have a ready kit."

That kit may include clothes, two to three days worth of food, extra prescription medication and important papers. This way, in the case of an evacuation, everyone would be ready to go.

"One of the things that we cannot do, is not stay vigilant" in the case of a below-average storm forecast, Spera said.

Take 1992, for example. Only one hurricane made landfall in the United States. Andrew grew to become a category 5 storm, hitting south Florida. It caused $26 billion in damage, and directly killed 26 people. Seasons like 1992 are cause for concern.

The best advice is to prepare and stay vigilant. When dangerous weather threatens, count on the First Alert weather team for the best information to keep you and your family safe.

Download the NBC Connecticut app here.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[NOAA Releases Seasonal Hurricane Forecast]]> Wed, 27 May 2015 14:27:51 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/TYLER_HURRICAN_INFORMATION_1200x675_452341316000.jpg ]]> <![CDATA[Thunderstorms Move Through State]]> Wed, 27 May 2015 21:18:06 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/thunderstorms+may+27+night.png

Heavy rain and thunderstorms are moving east across the state, but the threat of severe storms has passed and all warnings and watches have been canceled.

Heat and humidity fueled storms through the afternoon and into the evening. Despite the potential for winds of up to 60 mph and small hail, most damage has been reported over the state line in western Massachusetts.

A cold front comes through Thursday, likely early enough to preclude any significant weather.

A spot shower or storm is possible midday; otherwise, a mix of sun and clouds is anticipated.
Expect mostly sunny skies Friday. Not only will there be a break from the shower and thunderstorm threat, but the humidity will be gone for the day. Temperatures will be in the low 80s inland, upper 70s at the water.

At this point, the weekend looks split. A strong cold front will come through Sunday. That means increasing clouds, breezy and warm conditions on Saturday with temperatures in the mid-80s. A pop-up shower can’t be ruled out, but the vast majority of the rain and possibly thunder will occur Sunday.

Early indications for the start of next week show high pressure building down from Canada, meaning much cooler conditions. Temperatures will be stuck in the 60s! There is the chance for showers on both Monday and Tuesday, especially in southern areas, as a frontal boundary will be stalled to the south.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.]]>
<![CDATA[Heat, Humidity Building]]> Wed, 27 May 2015 07:20:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/52615+heat+and+humidity+1200.jpg

Noticeably warmer and more humid air has moved into southern New England, and that will set the stage for some thunderstorms on Wednesday.

The most widespread showers and thunderstorms this week will occur on Wednesday. The potential for severe weather is low, though the atmosphere will be primed with moisture. Any storm will produce torrential rain. Most of the shower and thunderstorm activity will be confined to the western half of the state, between noon and 8 p.m.

A cold front comes through on Thursday, likely early enough to preclude any significant weather. A spot shower is possible midday; otherwise a mix of sun and clouds is anticipated.

Friday looks splendid, with mostly sunny skies! Not only will there be a break from the shower and thunderstorm threat, but the humidity will be gone for the day. Temperatures will be in the low 80s inland, upper 70s at the water.

At this point, the weekend looks split. A strong cold front will come through Sunday. That means increasing clouds, breezy and warm conditions on Saturday with temperatures in the middle 80s. A pop up shower can’t be ruled out, but the vast majority of the rain and possibly thunder will occur Sunday.

Early indications for the start of next week show high pressure building down from Canada, meaning much cooler conditions.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Hottest Temperatures of the Year]]> Tue, 26 May 2015 14:48:44 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Sun+Generic.jpg

Memorial Day was the unofficial start of summer and the summery weather is here today, with temperatures near 90 inland.

The temperature has hit 89 degrees Fahrenheit in West Hartford, making it the warmest day of  the year so far.

Temperatures are also expected to reach 75 to 80 degrees at the shore.

We’re looking at humidity on Wednesday and Thursday, which could lead to a few thunder storms.

If you’re out and enjoying the day, send photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.

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<![CDATA[Thunderstorms Bring Downpours, Lightning and Hail]]> Tue, 19 May 2015 23:35:35 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/goshen+hail+may+19.jpg

Thunderstorms moving west across the state brought downpours, hail and lots of lightning Tuesday night.

The National Weather Service warned that storms could be accompanied by wind gusts of up to 60 mph and hail the size of a quarter.

Chief Meteorologist Brad Field said three-quarter-inch hail has been reported in Cornwall, and lightning struck the state 89 times over the course of just 15 minutes.

Firefighters in Torrington said a house fire on Weed Road may have been sparked by a lightning strike. South Main Street was also briefly closed due to flooding, according to the police department.

The only report of storm damage Tuesday night was in Sharon, where trees came down across Route 4 and Route 41, according to the Department of Transportation. Route 4 was closed in the area of Butter Road and Route 41 was closed at Bolland Road.

Eversource reported up to 400 power outages, concentrated mostly in areas of western Connecticut such as Sharon and Burlington.

Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan said storms were expected to weaken as they moved southeast across the state toward the shoreline.



Photo Credit: DeDe Fesh
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<![CDATA[Brush Fires Break Out Around State]]> Mon, 04 May 2015 17:40:48 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/harwinton+brush+fire+1200.jpg

Firefighters have already responded to at least three brush fires around the state today.

As temperatures climbed into the 80s, officials from the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection warned this morning that the fire danger for today is very high.

Brush fires have broken out in the area of 188 Central Avenue in Wolcott, 1317 Weed Road in Torrington, 303 Shenipsit Lake Road in Tolland and on East Rock Peak in New Haven.

Earlier, firefighters battled a brush fire sparked by a logging machine in Harwinton

State officials warn that open burning is not allowed when the fire danger is elevated.

Permits residents obtained from a local open burning official to burn brush on personal property are not valid if the forest fire danger is rated high, very high or extreme and you are burning within 100 feet of a grassland or woodland.

The National Weather Service has issued a special statement for most of Connecticut, indicating that there is an elevated threat for fire to spread because of wind gusts of 20 to 25 miles per hour.

The state can experience high fire danger between mid-March and May and there have been several brush fires this season.

If you spot a forest fire, DEEP urges you to remain calm and call 911 to report the fire as quickly as possible to the local fire department.

Crews also fought fires at the Inn at Mystic and at a home in Newtown that collapsed



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Freeze Warnings Issued as Temperatures Fall]]> Sat, 25 Apr 2015 09:19:16 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/april+24+freeze+warnings.png

For the second night in a row, freeze warnings were issued Friday night for seven of the state's eight counties as temperatures are expected to once again drop to unseasonable lows.

Freeze warnings were issued for early Saturday morning in every county except Litchfield. Many areas of the state fell into the 20s overnight.

Warnings were also issued overnight Thursday into Friday after snow showers and even some sleet and hail moved through parts of the state.

The air is about 15-20 degrees colder than usual this time of year, according to Chief First Alert Meteorologist Brad Field. The National Weather Service is urging residents to cover outdoor plants to protect them from the cold.

We'll see a bit of a warm up going into the weekend. Saturday and Sunday will be 60 degrees with some cloud cover.

Send your weather photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.


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<![CDATA[Meet First Alert 1]]> Fri, 24 Apr 2015 15:49:15 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/First+Alert+One_Jeep_1200.jpg First Alert 1 is the first-ever weather vehicle equipped with mobile radar built on a custom Jeep Wrangler 4x4. This groundbreaking vehicle was designed specifically to allow meteorologists and reporters to drive directly to the storm and deliver the most hyper local-weather conditions to local viewers.

Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[First Alert 1 Has First Mobile Radar in CT]]> Thu, 23 Apr 2015 08:12:31 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/First_Alert_1_has_First_Mobile_Radar_in_CT_1200x675_432792131609.jpg NBC Connecticut meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan shows what First Alert 1 can do. It includes mobile radar and a mobile weather station.]]> <![CDATA[Cleaning Up the Damage Storm Left Behind]]> Thu, 23 Apr 2015 06:56:49 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/manchester+tree+on+house.jpg

Residents across part of Connecticut are cleaning up after gusty winds and torrential rain caused damage last night, brought a tree down onto a house in Manchester and caused thousands of power outages statewide.

A tree came crashing down on the home at 71 Delmont Street and the homeowner said children usually play in the damaged room, but in a move that saved their lives, they decided to stay downstairs and play video games.

Wind gusts of up to nearly 40 mph were reported in parts of the state and more than 1,600 homes lost power in North Haven at the height of the storm. Traffic lights were also affected, and police directed traffic and set up temporary signs.

Small hail was also reported in the evening hours.

Eversource Energy reported thousands of outages in its coverage area as well. At one point, 31 percent of Haddam and 19 percent of Killingworth were without power, along with hundreds of residences in Newington, Hartford and Andover.

As of Thursday morning, power was back on for all but three customers.

Strong winds brought down trees on Route 10 in Southington, Middlebury Road in Middlebury, Avery Street in South Windsor, Route 147 in Middlefield.

Wires came down on Fenn Road near King Arthur Highway in Newington, prompting a large power outage that affected a condo complex. Power lines also fell on Holmes Road and South Main Street in Newington, according to police.

Flood warnings remain in effect through tomorrow for Hartford and Middlesex counties along the Connecticut River.

If you take weather photos, send them to us at shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.


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<![CDATA[Manchester Family Escapes Injury When Tree Crashes Through Roof]]> Thu, 23 Apr 2015 07:22:06 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/manchester+tree+on+house.jpg

A Manchester family narrowly avoided injury after strong winds toppled a tree on the property on Wednesday evening, severing the trunk and sending it smashing through a second-story room.

Footage from the scene shows a gaping hole in the roof of the two-story home at 71 Delmont Street. The homeowner said children usually play in the damaged room, but in a move that saved their lives, they decided to stay downstairs and play video games.

"Normally my nephew would be up in that room and he was downstairs, so we're just so thankful for that," said homeowner Wendy Silver. "All that matters is everyone is just fine."

Firefighters were called to the property around 5:15 p.m. and crews cordoned off the home, which is uninhabitable.

The tree is one of several to come down during the storm Wednesday evening, cutting power to thousands of homes around the state.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Cuts Power to Traffic Lights in North Haven]]> Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:50:58 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/new+haven+power+outages.jpg

More than 1,600 homes lost power in North Haven on Wednesday evening and traffic lights went off after strong winds brought down wires, possibly affecting a transformer, according to the police department.

Police said crews are working to repair traffic lights on State State Street near Route 22. It's not clear how far the outages extend. In the meantime, police will direct traffic and put up temporary signs.

Crews from United Illuminating have been working to restore power, and have reduced the number of outages in town from more than 1,600 to less than 100, according to the outage map.

Outages have also been reported in other parts of the state, including hundreds in Hartford, Newington and Andover. Earlier Wednesday evening, 31 percent of Haddam and 19 percent of Killingworth were without power.

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<![CDATA[First Alert 1 Hits the Streets]]> Thu, 23 Apr 2015 09:16:26 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/First+Alert+One_Jeep_1200.jpg

Continuing its commitment to deliver viewers accurate, immediate and reliable forecasts, NBC Connecticut/WVIT today unveiled First Alert 1, the first-ever weather vehicle equipped with mobile radar built on a custom Jeep Wrangler 4x4. This groundbreaking vehicle was designed specifically to allow meteorologists and reporters to drive directly to the storm and deliver the most hyper local-weather conditions to local viewers.

“With First Alert 1, we can provide live forecasts directly from areas being hit the hardest in a storm, allowing us to take news gathering and storm chasing to a whole new level,” said Ric Harris, General Manager and President, NBC Connecticut. “There is no other vehicle like First Alert 1 on the road and NBC Connecticut is proud to be a weather innovator.”

The First Alert 1 vehicle provides viewers with the most accurate look at live weather and road conditions directly in their hometowns. From winter blizzards to severe summer lightning storms, there will no limit to where this Jeep will be able go and deliver live radar, live video and live reports, even while the truck is moving.

The mobile radar has the ability to see crystal-clear targets up to 36 miles away and inside storm cells more than 19 miles away. The mobile weather station can measure wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, relative humidity, air temperature, wind chill and more.

First Alert 1 also features live cameras inside and out of the vehicle, including a 360 degree camera to bring viewers a complete view of local weather and road conditions.

“First Alert 1 enables us to gather the most accurate and local weather conditions from Connecticut neighborhoods to better prepare our viewers and their families for severe weather,” said Brad Field, Chief Meteorologist, NBC Connecticut.

The launch of First Alert 1 represents the latest investment NBC Connecticut has made in its weather coverage, which is delivered by an experienced team of meteorologists led by Field.

Eighteen months ago, the station launched AT1, the first-of-its-kind 4x4 pickup truck capable of transmitting high-definition satellite and microwave images in even the roughest of weather conditions. Additionally, NBC Connecticut will also unveil a brand new First Alert Weather Center to deliver more weather information and road conditions from across the state in each of its local newscasts.

Follow First Alert 1 on Twitter @FirstAlert1CT.
 



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[Gusty Winds Cause Power Outages Around the State]]> Wed, 22 Apr 2015 23:37:51 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/weha+tree+down+1.jpg

Gusty winds and torrential rain moving east across the state brought down trees and wires Wednesday evening, causing thousands of power outages statewide.

Rumbles of thunder and wind gusts of up to nearly 40 mph were also reported in parts of the state, along with small hail in the evening hours.

More than 1,600 homes lost power in North Haven at the height of the storm. Traffic lights were also affected, and police directed traffic and set up temporary signs.

Eversource Energy reported thousands of outages in its coverage area as well. At one point, 31 percent of Haddam and 19 percent of Killingworth were without power, along with hundreds of residences in Newington, Hartford and Andover.

Strong winds brought down trees on Route 10 in Southington, Middlebury Road in Middlebury, Avery Street in South Windsor, Route 147 in Middlefield.

Wires came down on Fenn Road near King Arthur Highway in Newington, prompting a large power outage that affected a condo complex. Power lines also fell on Holmes Road and South Main Street in Newington, according to police.

The heaviest rain is moving out to the east, but we could continue to see some scattered showers throughout the evening before skies clear around midnight.

Flood warnings remain in effect through tomorrow for Hartford and Middlesex counties along the Connecticut River.

If you take weather photos, send them to us at shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: Lauren R.
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.]]>
<![CDATA[Flood Warnings in Effect Along Parts of Connecticut River]]> Tue, 21 Apr 2015 22:50:00 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Water+over+road+in+portland+1200.jpg

Flood warnings have been extended for Hartford and Middlesex counties along the Connecticut River after heavy rain Monday caused water levels to rise.

The National Weather Service predicts the river will rise above flood stage by Wednesday afternoon.

We could see minor flooding in low-lying areas of Hartford, Wethersfield and Glastonbury. According to the NWS, Flooding is likely along Route 17A in Portland.

It will be dry overnight, but showers and thunderstorms will likely develop again Wednesday afternoon and into the evening.

Flood warnings are expected to remain in effect through Thursday night.

Send your weather photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Flood Warning Issued for Middlesex County as Rain Continues]]> Mon, 20 Apr 2015 23:32:05 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/april+21+morning+radar.jpg

Hours of heavy rain around the state Monday has prompted the National Weather Service to issue a flood warning for Middlesex County along the Connecticut River.

The warning remains in effect through Tuesday morning. Minor flooding could continue overnight, along with scattered showers and a chance of thunderstorms.

Thick fog settling over parts of the state has severely reduced visibility on the roads. Dense fog advisories have also been issued for Faifield, Middlesex, New Haven and New London counties until 6 a.m. Tuesday.

We'll continue to see isolated showers Tuesday morning and into the afternoon.

Send your weather photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.

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<![CDATA[Flood Warnings Issued for Parts of State]]> Thu, 16 Apr 2015 13:37:24 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Water+over+road+in+portland+1200.jpg

Flood warnings have been issued for parts of Connecticut because the Connecticut River is above flooding stage.

Flood stage is 16 feet for the river in the Hartford area, according to the National Weather Service, and it was at 16.7 feet as of 12:46 p.m. and is expected to rise to nearly 17.4 feet by early Friday before beginning to fall.

In Middle Haddam, flood stage is 7 feet and the Connecticut River had already reached 7.1 feet as of 12:55 p.m., causing minor flooding, according to the National Weather Service. The river is expected to continue rising to near 7.7 feet after midnight.

Lowland flooding is expected along the river from Hartford through Wethersfield and Glastonbury and affect several riverside roadways, as well as several park and recreational facilities.

Further downstream flooding has expected in low-lying sections along the Connecticut River from Wethersfield and Glastonbury downstream through Cromwell and Middletown.

http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/weather/severe-weather-alerts/?superRegionName=CT&regionName=Hartford&alertType=Flood+Warning&viewAll=true

In Portland, Route 17A is closed near the fairgrounds because of flooding.
The flood warning is in effect until further notice.
 



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[FEMA Funds Coming to Connecticut Cities and Towns]]> Thu, 09 Apr 2015 19:50:07 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/6pfemastill040915max00000000.jpg

The Obama administration has approved a Federal Disaster Declaration for Connecticut municipalities affected by January's blizzard and subsequent snow events that hampered snow removal efforts.

Mayors and town managers in the state were thrilled to get the news.

"This is tremendous for our city," said New London Mayor Daryl Justin Finizio.

He said the city tore through its snow removal budget quickly with the number of serious snow events.

"We don’t budget for 20 plowable events," Finizio said. "I think the city in better budget times, at its height nine or 10 years ago they budgeted for nine or 10 storms. That was cut down to six in recent years even before I became mayor."

FEMA will reimburse up to 75 percent of snow removal funds to towns and cities, but there's no guarantee that all funds will qualify for that reimbursement threshold.

Gov. Dannel Malloy announced the president's decision yesterday and applauded the move.

"We had extraordinary weather this winter – and through smart decisions, we got through it. We’re pleased that we were successful in our application. This declaration will provide much needed financial assistance to the state and to the municipalities hardest hit by the January blizzard," Malloy said in a statement.

The town of Tolland budgeted $300,000 for snow removal and even has an emergency fund set aside. By the end of the winter, the town had about $75,000 left after spending more than $450,000 on snow removal.

"The snow started mid-January and up until then, we thought we were having a mild winter, and then it never stopped past that point," said Tolland Town Manager Steven Werbner.

He said if another weather emergency had happened over the summer or fall, Tolland would have faced "significant shortfalls" by his estimation.

"FEMA help is certainly something we welcome because it will enable us to replenish our coffers somewhat," he said.

City and towns are hopeful that they receive FEMA funds in June to coincide with the fiscal year, but there's no guarantee when federal officials will release cash to cities and towns.

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<![CDATA[Icy Patches on Roads]]> Thu, 09 Apr 2015 07:57:21 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/April+9+CT+Temp.jpg

Temperatures are in the 30s this morning and there are some slick spots in the roads.

Parts of Connecticut are below freezing this morning, including the northwest hills, Mansfield, Stafford Springs, Staffordville, Somers and parts of Enfield. Temperatures are also below freezing in northern Windham County.

Ice is problem in areas above 800 feet in elevation, according to NBC Connecticut meteorologist Bob Maxon.

In Norfolk, Department of Transportation crews were called out to treat the roads.

Temperatures will only reach the 40s today, which is 20 degrees below normal.

Friday, however, will reach 60 and temperatures will be near 70 on Tuesday.
 

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<![CDATA[Icy Roads, School Delays Possible as Temperatures Drop]]> Wed, 08 Apr 2015 23:36:17 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/icy+spots+april+8.jpg

Rain showers and dropping temperatures could create icy patches on the roads overnight and even lead to some school delays in the morning, according to First Alert Meteorologist Garett Argianas.

Expect showers and drizzle to continue through Thursday morning. Some sleet could mix with rain in the northern part of the state.

Temperatures will be near freezing in the northern hills overnight. Patches of black ice are possible into the morning, creating the potential for some school delays. Check to see if your school is affected.

Thursday will be cloudy and cool.

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<![CDATA[State to Receive Federal Aid for January Blizzard]]> Wed, 08 Apr 2015 18:44:42 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/stonington+cars+buried.JPG

The office of Gov. Dannel Malloy announced Wednesday afternoon that the state will receive federal aid in connection with the January blizzard that buried parts of the state under nearly 3 feet of snow.

Federal funds will benefit Connecticut state agencies, along with towns in New London, Windham and Tolland counties and the Mohegan and Mashantucket Pequot tribal nations, according to Malloy's office.

Those agencies and municipalities will be reimbursed 75 percent of the money they spent cleaning up after the blizzard, which hit the state Jan. 26-28 of this year.

It comes with the blessing of President Barack Obama, who on Wednesday approved Malloy's request to declare a major disaster in Connecticut.

"We had extraordinary weather this winter – and through smart decisions, we got through it. We’re pleased that we were successful in our application," Malloy said in a statement Wednesday. "This declaration will provide much needed financial assistance to the state and to the municipalities hardest hit by the January blizzard."

All Connecticut counties and tribal nations are can also apply for financial assisance under the Federam Emergency Management Agency Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, according to the governor's office.

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<![CDATA[Winds Knock Out Power, Down Trees and Wires]]> Sat, 04 Apr 2015 19:33:07 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/4415WVIT+Warnings+NE.png

Following high wind gusts on Saturday that left more than 1,700 without power and knocked down trees and wires across the state, there could be some light flurries and rain on Easter Sunday.

The high winds knocked down trees and wires  across the state on Saturday. A large tree fell on Russert Lane in Southington and the fire department said it was likely wind-related. In Simsbury, a tree fell on a car on West Mountain Road. West Rocks Road was closed Saturday between Bayne Street and Route 7 after a tree fell and snapped a utility pole. Wind knocked down wires, causing a brush fire nearby on Route 184 in Groton, which was closed as a result Saturday.

Hundreds lost power during the height of the wind. By 6:41 p.m., most power was restored to United Illuminating customers and 1,371 Eversource customers remained without it. That's in comparison to the 1,620 Eversource customers, mostly in Southington, Stamford, Weston, Wilton and Windham and about 156 United Illuminating customers in Fairfield who were without power at 5:15 p.m.

The northern half of the state was placed under a wind advisory Saturday as gusts traveled as fast as 40 to 50 miles an hour statewide.

After the wind dies down at sunset with winds continuing into the evening, a weak storm system moving in overnight could bring some light flurries in the morning on Easter Sunday, but we'll also have a sunny start to the day before rain moves in. Temperatures are expected to reach a high of 48 inland for a breezy Sunday.

Another weak system following that will likely bring rain and could mean a chance of isolated snow showers Sunday night in Litchfield County. However temperatures will warm up a bit, potentially reaching 56 degrees.

Tuesday will likely dip to 40 degrees and it will remain chilly through Thursday at around 44. Come Friday, the weather is looking milder, with the temperature reaching 59 degrees.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Thick Fog and Heavy Rain Tonight]]> Fri, 03 Apr 2015 23:26:33 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/foggy+andover.jpg

Scattered showers are moving through the state and thick fog is rolling in, reducing visibility on the roads.

Dense fog advisories have been issued for seven of the state's eight counties until 6 a.m. Saturday.

Rain will also pick up, with the heaviest, steadiest rain coming down between 3 and 6 a.m., according to Chief First Alert Meteorologist Brad Field. Flashes of lightning and rumbles of thunder are also possible. A flood watch is in effect for Litchfield County.

We'll see temperatures in the 40s overnight and it won't warm up much during the day Saturday.

Strong winds are also moving in from the northwest, where the air is cold. Winds gusting between 25 and 50 mph Saturday will create the potential for some scattered power outages.

Wind advisories are in effect for the northern part of the state – in Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland and Windham counties – from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

Scattered showers and even some snow is possible Sunday afternoon and into the evening. We could see some accumulation in the northern hills.

Next week will be chilly and wet.

Send your weather photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[Black Ice Possible Tonight]]> Tue, 31 Mar 2015 22:57:09 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/black+ice+sidewalk.jpg

Rain and snow showers that moved through the state Tuesday could lead to patches of black ice overnight as the temperature drops.

Cold will linger through the morning commute, when we'll see temperatures between 25 and 30 degrees statewide. Puddles on the roads could potentially become black ice.

There will be a bit of warming during the day, with mixed clouds and sun and temperatures in the 40s.

Temperatures will average in the 50s on Thursday. It could get as warm as the mid-60s on Friday as we head into Easter weekend, depending on whether the storm system stays on course or sweeps further south.

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<![CDATA[Snow Showers Move Out, Rain This Afternoon]]> Mon, 30 Mar 2015 09:05:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/snow+in+Lakeville+Leslie+Sykes-ONeill.jpg

Even though Connecticut is in for a run of warm weather this week, a quick burst of snow came through this morning, leaving a fresh coating.

There are still some scattered snow showers in central Connecticut, but no accumulation is expected, according to First Alert Meteorologist Darren Sweeney.

Snow fell in Western Connecticut, as well as in southern Connecticut.

One heavy burst of snow came through along the Interstate-395 corridor around 8:30 a.m.

While most of the snow has moved out, rain showers are possible this afternoon, or closer to the evening commute.

Throughout the rest of the morning and afternoon, temperatures will build up to the mid-40s for breezy milder weather with more rain showers possible.

The warm streak will last for most of the week, staying in the 40s and 50s, possibly reaching the 60s by Friday. Winds in the southeast could reach 10 to 20 miles an hour.

There could be rain late Friday into Saturday on Easter weekend, possibly mixing with some wet snow as cooler air comes in Saturday morning.



Photo Credit: Leslie Sykes-O'Neill]]>
<![CDATA[Icy Roads Cause Dozens of Spinouts and Crashes]]> Sat, 28 Mar 2015 22:55:37 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/slippery+conditions.jpg

Snow falling throughout the day has left wet spots on the roads that are icing over and causing dozens of crashes and spinouts as temperatures drop.

State police said slick roads are causing problems "all over the place."

"Troops are very busy tonight with crashes due to this awful weather," said state police spokesman Sgt. Shane Hassett.

Most crashes have been minor, but a collision on Interstate 84 westbound in Farmington shut down the highway near exit 39 for a period of time Saturday evening. Emergency responders searched an embankment off the side of the highway and found a car rolled over in the woods.

Hassett said the driver was hospitalized for treatment of minor injuries and received a verbal warning for traveling too fast.

Emergency crews are also responding to a crash and major fuel spill on I-84 westbound just prior to exit 69 in Tolland, where a tractor-trailer collided with several cars and leaked 150 gallons of diesel fuel onto the highway. Officials said traffic has been affected on both the eastbound and westbound sides of the highway.

Route 8 southbound was also closed in Derby near the Shelton town line while emergency crews respond to a six-car pileup, according to firefighters. Officials are also responding to a crash on Route 8 northbound between exits 11 and 12.

State police said they've responded to two dozen crashes on I-84 in the Danbury area alone. A number of additional incidents have been reported on I-84, Route 8, I-91 and I-691. Police said Route 15 is also a sheet of ice.

Snow will continue falling past midnight and temperatures will dip down into the 20s overnight. Skies will clear Sunday, with highs near 40.



Photo Credit: Connecticut Department of Transportation
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<![CDATA[Shoreline Residents Underestimate Storm Threat: Study]]> Thu, 26 Mar 2015 18:45:56 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/shorelinestudy03262015.jpg

Even after Tropical Storm Irene and Superstorm Sandy battered the Connecticut coast, a recent survey of 1,100 residents living along the shoreline shows that many underestimate storm threats.

"When we asked people, what's the most likely cause of injury or death in a hurricane, most people thought it was blown or falling objects from high winds. Turns out, most hurricanes cause injury or death from storm surge," said Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, which conducted the study.

During Irene and Sandy, many shoreline towns posted mandatory evacuation orders. The survey found only 21 percent of residents would leave their homes in a Category 2 hurricane, while 58 percent would leave if they were ordered to.

"Seventy percent of Connecticut residents don't even know that they live in an evacuation zone, as an example, which is kind of amazing, and likewise, three-quarters have never even seen an evacuation map, so they don't know how to get out if they need to," said Leiserowitz.

Some have said, however, they learned from the last two major storms and understand the importance of heeding the warnings.

"If they tell you to get out of here, you should get out of here," said Shelton resident Dave Youngquist.

New Haven Deputy Emergency Management Director Rick Fontana said the city issued mandatory evacuations during the two storms. Some people left and others stayed.

He said the evacuations were for the safety of the residents and first responders, who wouldn’t have been able to reach flooded areas during an emergency.
 

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<![CDATA[Foggy Morning, Rain Later]]> Thu, 26 Mar 2015 07:53:57 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/March+26+6HREXACT.jpg

The temperatures are rising, but the day is starting out with dense fog and rain is on the way for later today.

The National Weather Service has issued dense fog advisories until 10 a.m.

Rain is likely today and thunder is possible tonight. Temperatures will drop from a high of 45 to 50 down to 38 tonight.
 



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Cold Spring Continues With Plunging Temperatures]]> Sun, 22 Mar 2015 11:37:45 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/32215CT+Temp.jpg

Plunging temperatures caused any moisture left on roadways to freeze overnight into Sunday and the windchill continues the cold start to spring.

After 1 to 8 inches of snow fell across the state and temperatures warmed Saturday in the 40s, it dropped to 20s overnight. It will likely be in the 30s for the remainder of Sunday with potential for wind gusts of 40 miles-per-hour. The windchill factor is making it feel like temperatures are in the teens and 20s.

Sunday and Monday will be the coldest days this week, with temperatures in the 30s on Monday.

It will likely begin to warm up again on Wednesday into Thursday, but rain is also in the forecast.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Spring Snow Flurries Continue Saturday]]> Sat, 21 Mar 2015 15:21:05 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/32115+Hartford+snowy+parking+lot+edited.jpg

It may have been the first day of spring Friday, but winter just wouldn't let go as snow blanketed the state and caused problems on the roads. As residual flurries wrap up on Saturday, the temperatures will take a plunge overnight, possibly creating slick conditions.

Snow moved out around midnight into Saturday as driving conditions deteriorated throughout the evening Friday and overnight. Flurries continued Saturday morning and the snow is expected to end by midday, bringing as much as another inch, according to NBC Connecticut  First Alert meteorologist Bob Maxon. 

By early evening, we may see a quick burst of rain and snow showers. As temperatures drop into the 20s, ice may develop on the roadways overnight, possibly making for a slippery commute on Sunday. Wind gusts are also expected to pick up.

The St. Patrick's Day parade is scheduled for Saturday and officials spent the morning getting ready for it and shoveling sidewalks.

Norwalk police said they responded to more than three dozen crashes Friday. The northbound side of Interstate 395 was closed for more than two hours in Thomspon, and minor collisions have been reported on other state highways, including on Route 8 in Seymour, Interstate 84 in West Hartford and Route 15 in Stamford.

As of 10:30 p.m. Friday, 4.3 inches of new snow were recorded in Hamden, 3.8 inches in North Haven, 3.3 in New Fairfield, 3 in Burlington, 2.5 in Prospect and 2.0 in Coventry.

There were winter weather advisories in effect until 4 a.m. Saturday for Middlesex, New Haven, New London and Fairfield counties.

The weather will warm up slightly on Saturday with highs in the lower 40s. We'll see fair and cold weather come Sunday through Tuesday.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[Winds Bring Down Trees, Knock Out Power For 2nd Day in a Row]]> Wed, 18 Mar 2015 21:15:30 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Tree+down+from+Amy+1200.jpg

Whipping winds of up to 50 mph have brought down trees and power lines in several communities for the second day in a row.

Eversource Energy reported a total of more than 5,000 power outages around the state Wednesday afternoon. Many outages are concentrated in Portland, where a fallen tree took down wires and a utility pole snapped on Cox Road near Route 17.

Strong winds blew over a gas station canopy on Washington Avenue in Middletown, downed wires cut power to the elementary, middle and high schools in Putnam this afternoon, prompting a 2:30 p.m. dismissal.

Fire broke out when a large tree came down on Route 44 in Canton. Power was knocked out to traffic lights from Route 179 to the Simsbury town line.

Sunrise Hill Drive was closed at Ridgewood Road in West Hartford while crews worked to remove a tree from the road. The fire department in Windsor Locks reported that wires came down across South Street.

School buses in Mansfield were also affected. The school sent an alert Wednesday saying bus 1 was about 25 minutes late because of a fallen tree.
 

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<![CDATA[Dropping Temperatures Pave Way for Black Ice]]> Tue, 17 Mar 2015 22:05:56 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/FEELSLIKE.jpg

As temperatures dip down below freezing, melted snow is causing concern about black ice.

Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan said temperatures are expected to drop into the 20s overnight, with wind chills in the single digits.

Puddles of snow melt are liable to re-freeze across the state, making for slick travel conditions.

Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton described Clapboard Ridge Road as a "black ice nightmare" and said the area is blocked off until state workers arrive to put down snowmelt.

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<![CDATA[Residual Road Closures, Outages Due to Winds]]> Wed, 18 Mar 2015 08:03:15 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/strong+road+south+windsor+1+crop.jpg

Wind gusts of up to 58 mph brought down trees and wires in the northern part of the state, causing more than 12,000 power outages and prompting several road closures late Tuesday afternoon and overnight into Wednesday.

According to Eversource Energy, there are some lingering power outages, including 110 in Norwalk and 121 in Wilton, as of 7:47 a.m. More than 12,000 people lost electricity at the height of the wind storm, a number that has since dropped down to about 754 on Wednesday morning. The greatest number of outages were reported in Hartford.

Greenwich emergency crews were busy Tuesday night due to high winds and black ice on the roads, according to police. Butternut Hallow Road will remain closed until 8 a.m. Stanwich Road is closed between Cat Rock Road and Hill Road. Taconic Road in Greenwich is open to one lane as Eversource crews work on repairing wires hindered by a fallen tree. The tree has been cleared.

Rockville Hospital in Vernon also lost electricity and resorted to a generator, according to a hospital spokesperson.

Buckland Road was closed for hours near the intersection of Route 30 in South Windsor after a power line blew into the roadway, according to South Windsor Police Chief Matthew Reed. The road reopened around 9:30 p.m. Tuesday after Eversource Energy removed a live wire from the road.

Fallen trees were also reported on Chapel Street and Ellington Road in South Windsor, on Miller Road in West Hartford, Berlin Street in Berlin and on Aspenwood Drive in the Weatogue section of Simsbury. Hartford police said trees came down in the city's West End and North End.

Route 117 was closed between Village Drive and Church Hill Road in Ledyard while crews work to remove a tree that fell onto primary wires, according to the police department. Eversource Energy is en route to make repairs.

Service along the Metro-North Danbury Branch was delayed 10-15 minutes due to downed wires in the area of Branchville, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Trees also came down onto homes in South Windsor, Hartford and West Hartford.

South Windsor police said no one was hurt and nothing was damaged when a tree fell onto the house at 1201 Strong Road in South Windsor. Another tree struck a home on Barbour Street in Hartford, while a third toppled onto a home in the Astronaut Village neighborhood near Westfarms Mall in West Hartford.

Meanwhile, East Windsor police and fire officials were called to Cricket Road after a cable TV line blew off a house and onto a school bus. Police said only the bus driver was on board at the time. Police pulled the wire off the bus and firefighters moved it from the roadway.

A driver in Torrington narrowly escaped when a pine tree came down onto his moving pickup truck on Torringford Road, the Republican-American reports.

Over in Wethersfield, an antenna fell onto an SUV in the parking lot of the Wethersfield Housing Authority complex at 60 Lancaster Road. One vehicle sustained minor damage and no one was hurt.

Winds of up to 58 mph were recorded at Bradley International Airport, while gusts reached 51 mph in Greenwich. A spokesperson for Eversource Energy said wind is pushing tree limbs into power lines.

Gusts died down overnight, but winds were still strong in the morning. Temperatures will fall into the 20s with single-digit wind chills, according to First Alert Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan.

Winds will pick up again tomorrow, and wind advisories have been issued for Hartford, Tolland and Windham counties from 9 a.m. through 5 p.m. Wednesday.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Milford Helps Nearby Towns With Pothole Repairs]]> Fri, 13 Mar 2015 18:13:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/milford+pothole.jpg

Milford and Ansonia have a new agreement in place to help both towns thaw out after one of the most road-damaging winters in a long time.

“We have an asphalt recycler which really no other town in the state has,” said Milford Mayor Benjamin Blake. “There are a few of them out there but we’re unique. We’ve had this piece of equipment for the last 10 years.”

The Milford Public Works Department’s Begala machine melts chunks of asphalt at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. The substance becomes what’s known in the industry as “hot patch” and is then used to repair potholes and sections of roads that have been damaged by combinations of plows, ice and snow, and product meant to improve traction for vehicles.

The Begala asphalt melting machine in Milford is valuable during a time of year where it’s difficult to find a place to melt asphalt.

“During the winter months, the asphalt plants are closed down so the other municipalities, if they don’t have asphalt recyclers, they’re out of luck,” said Blake

Ansonia’s Department of Public Works has struck a deal to pay Milford $50 per ton of hot patch. Trucks from Ansonia have been busy too.

“We’ve been averaging about 10 tons ourselves,” said Tom Hunt, a highway foreman with the Milford DPW. “The city of Ansonia has been coming down and we’ve been helping them out. We give them about 4-8 tons a day.”

Hunt describes this season as “the worst in a generation” for potholes.

Milford’s mayor said the deal to allow Ansonia to purchase hot patch at a reduced rate is catching on. Other towns are inquiring about using Milford's Begala, which Blake said is the kind of program that taxpayers expect.

“We’re always looking to make things more efficient and streamline the way our local government operates and looking for new streams of revenue,” he said.

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<![CDATA[15 Waterbury Mail Carriers Hurt Since January]]> Wed, 11 Mar 2015 21:38:52 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/usps+crop.jpg

More than a dozen Waterbury postal workers have been hurt since January thanks to winter weather, which has made for slippery conditions, blocked-off mailboxes and rambunctious dogs.

According to a spokesperson for the U.S. Postal Service, 15 mail carriers in Waterbury have suffered on-the-job injuries over the past three months.

Although most of those injuries are attributable to ice and snow, three postal workers suffered serious dog bites caused by cooped-up pups who rush out of the house when children on vacation come to the door, the USPS said.

The other dozen workers who were hurt slipped and fell on snow and ice while trying to deliver mail.

The potential for injury isn't the only challenge postal workers face in the winter. Mounting snowbanks and unshoveled walkways block access to mailboxes, preventing carriers from making their deliveries.

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<![CDATA[State Offers Advice to Homeowners as Snow Thaws]]> Tue, 10 Mar 2015 16:14:46 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/icedams02052015.jpg

As the first signs of spring become evident around Connecticut, the state is offering advice to homeowners whose properties could be affected by leaks from melting snow.

Officials are urging homeowners to check roofs both from the outside and the attic if possible. Look for signs of water damage to ceilings and walls, and clear all gutter spouts of snow so they can drain properly.

Regardless of whether you need repair work, seek out and research registered home improvement contractors so you know who to call in the event a problem arises.

All contractors should be registered with the Department of Consumer Protections and have proper liability and worker's compensation insurance, where applicable.

Ask subcontractors working on your home to sign lien wavers to protect you if they aren't paid, and avoid salesmen who offer to handle all insurance claims or promise there won't be a deductible.

Obtain a written contract before any work starts, and never pay in full up front. Pay enough to cover the start of the job and continue to pay as work progresses. Make a final payment only after the job has been finished and you're happy with the quality of the work.

You can verify a contractor license online or call the Department of Consumer Protection at 800-842-2649.

Anyone with problems, questions or concerns should call the DCP or email dcp.frauds@ct.gov. Insurance questions should be sent to cid.ca@ct.gov or 800-203-3447.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Record Cold, But Warmer Next Week]]> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 10:08:59 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/warm+up+next+week.jpg

Temperatures on Friday morning tied the record cold of 10 degrees in Bridgeport for this date, but more seasonable weather is on the way. We just have to be patient for a little while longer.

The average temperature for this time of year is around 44 degrees, and we’re moving in the right direction, with the high temperature of 42 expected on Tuesday and an increasing warmup on Wednesday and Thursday.

While we have a couple more days of 20- and 30-degree weather, one bright note is the lack of snow in the weekend forecast for the first time in several weeks.
 



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Barn Roofs Give Way Under Heavy, Wet Snow]]> Wed, 04 Mar 2015 23:59:13 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/stirrup+fun+stables.jpg

A long winter that has yet to wind down has spread heavy, wet snow across the state, causing roofs to cave in and barns to collapse.

A cow barn at Triangle A Stables in Middlefield became the latest victim Wednesday morning when its roof came down, trapping six cows inside.

"You go into all emergency mode," said Triangle A manager Margaret Schaulis. "It's like you forget to call 911 at the time, and you just got to get every animal out."

The farm animals received only minor injuries, but they weren't the ony ones to have a close call.

This past Saturday, Emergency Animal Response Service – a volunteer organization that helps rescue and shelter animals during disasters – saved horses trapped inside a barn that crumpled from the snow in East Hampton.

"Essentially the same type of training that a fire department goes through for people getting people out of collapsed buildings, for example, except we focus on how to do that with animals," explained rescuer Jon Nowinski.

The barn at Stirrup Fun Stables on Mack Road in Lebanon also gave way to the pressure of snow. The horse rescue organization said the barn was crucial to operations and insurance won't cover the cost.

The structure itself will be $150,000 to replace, and ownership will have to shell out much to cover the cost of labor, according to the barn owner.

It's a devastating blow many now face.

"There's not a lot of insurances covering these collapses anymore. It's like flood insurance. Good luck," said Schaulis.

A GoFundMe page has been set up to help Stirrup Fun Stables cover the cost of repairs.



Photo Credit: GoFundMe]]>
<![CDATA[New Haven Snow Budget Depleted as Winter Wears On]]> Wed, 04 Mar 2015 21:28:46 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/shorelineconcerns03042015.jpg

As winter weather continues into March, New Haven – like many other communities – is scrambling to compensate for a snow budget that has been totally drained.

The city is moving $300,000 from vacancies in the Department of Public Works to cover this week's storms.

Officials hope it will be enough. If it isn't, the city will have to find money elsewhere.

"We don't think that we'll run out, but it will make it difficult to do some of the other things we hope to do in the summer time," said Mayor Toni Harp.

City officials hope they won't have to move money from other departments, which could jeopardize programs like the one to keep school buildings open during spring break.

In the meantime, there's no end in sight for DPW crews. They worked through the day Wednesday to clean up slushy streets and prepare for a re-freeze that could prove dangerous tonight.

"We're worried about flooding. I've seen, as I was coming to work today, I saw a lot of our street corners were flooded," said Harp. "They're out there working really hard, so we can make sure things are as safe as possible."

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<![CDATA[Snow Could Take a Toll on High School Sports]]> Wed, 04 Mar 2015 23:36:18 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/530pspringstill030415doug00000000.jpg

Relentless snow has buried high school playing fields and could jeopardize spring seasons if it doesn't melt soon.

The sign on the tennis courts near Manchester High School says "tennis shoes only" but right now, only snowshoes can get you near the snow-covered nets.

Down the hill, hurdles peeking out from under the snow reveals just how much accumulation has to melt before the school can use its track.

"I suspect that coaches will get out here with some shovels and snowblowers and take at least a coat off there so the sun gets to it," said the athletic director, Lindsey Boutilier. "We'll be out here, my bet is, March 23, when we're due to get out here."

Practices for spring sports don't begin until then, except for baseball, which starts March 16. Boutilier said the snow has created a level playing field: all Connecticut high schools' fields are buried in snow.

"Everybody's worried," said the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference Executive Director Karissa Niehoff. "The rain increases the weight of the snow and it's so deep right now that removal basically is impossible."

She warned that the snow sits above a frozen tundra, and after the snow melts the ground will be soggy for days.

The first high school games are slated for April 8, and some schools may have to reschedule until later in the spring, even if that means teams will play four or five games a week.

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<![CDATA[Potential for Record Cold Ahead]]> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 00:06:15 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/cold+weather+march+5.jpg

Thursday's snowstorm ushered in much colder air, creating the potential for record lows overnight.

Most of the state will see temperatures between 0 and 10 degrees Thursday night into Friday morning. We're expecting a low of about 4 degrees at Bradley Airport and could see temperatures closer to 0 in the northwest hills.

Record cold is likely along the shoreline, according to Chief First Alert Meteorologist Brad Field. The current record in Bridgeport stands at 11 degrees, and we're projecting a low of 10 degrees overnight.

It comes in the wake of a snowstorm that once again centered around southeastern Connecticut. The New London area received up to 8 inches of fresh snow, while accumulation in the rest of the state ranged from 2 to 6 inches. Northern Connecticut saw just a dusting.

Looking ahead to the weekend, skies are clear.


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<![CDATA[Snow and Ice Make for Slippery Roads]]> Wed, 04 Mar 2015 00:04:32 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/snow-driving.jpg

Snow turning to sleet and freezing rain made the Tuesday evening commute tricky for travelers in Connecticut.

Just after 6:30 p.m., traffic was steady and even bumper to bumper at times coming out of Hartford on Interstate 84. As snow intensified and later turned to ice, conditions only got worse.

Manchester resident Barbara Bolton said snow and ice made the roads "just very slick."

Corey Jenkens, of Hartford, described them as "ugly" and "bad."

It took him 20 minutes to get from East Hartford to Manchester, twice as long as usual.

Meanwhile, Tim Rush was bracing for what he expected to be an hour-long drive to Simsbury, a trip that usually takes him 20 minutes.

”The highways are bad right now. We need them to plow it,” said Rush.

Department of Transportation crews were busy loading up at the East Hartford garage along I-84 Tuesday night.

"The roads are absolutely horrid out there. I did about 15 miles per hour all the way down 91. It was horrible out there," said Roxanne Mulvey.

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<![CDATA[More Winter Weather Strains Crews and Funds]]> Wed, 04 Mar 2015 00:08:54 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/waterbury+dpw.jpg

Another snowstorm has crews across the state working through the night.

"Tonight's going to be a critical night. Some of the crews have been in since four this morning, and I don't know that they'll get any sleep tonight," said Waterbury Department of Public WOrks Deputy Director David Simpson.

During the storm, crews are busy mixing and gathering salt and sand to place on the roads as trucks plow away the snowy mess. Their job is only half done when the storm ends, though. They continue working to remove what winter left behind.

"The crews have told me that they're very tired, but they're working. They're doing their jobs. They're responding every time. We're watching them for sleep and rest," said Simpson. "They're responding admirably every time. I can't tell you how proud I am of all the city crews working for us."

As neighborhood streets continue to narrow, even those who don't have to work through the storms say the piled-up snow and bitterly cold temperatures have taken a toll on them.

"I'm tired of the snow. I want summer already," said Waterbury resident Obie Gomez. "This is ridiculous. It's like every weekend snow, snow, snow."

As the snow turned to ice and then rain Tuesday night, the warmer weather was both good and bad news. While some of the snow will finally melt, potholes will pose a problem.

"The change in the temperature is what's going to affect the potholes, and that'll be the next challenge that we face at public works," said Simpson.

"The potholes are bad," said Gomez. "When the snow clears up, the bumps and everything you go right into a pothole. I walked into a pothole. You don't walk into potholes."

DPW will also be keeping an eye out on how fast the snow melts. If it melts too quickly it could cause flooding, so crews will need to be on top of clearing storm drains.

Waterbury has already received a transfer of funds for it contracting account and sand and salt account. Officials say they've advised the administration that the city's overtime account is at its peak.

The city says it has a contingency account and officials prepared but hope the latest transfers will take them through the rest of the season.

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