<![CDATA[NBC Connecticut - Connecticut Weather News and Coverage]]> Copyright 2015 http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/weather/stories http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC_Connecticut.png NBC Connecticut http://www.nbcconnecticut.com en-us Sat, 29 Aug 2015 21:41:06 -0400 Sat, 29 Aug 2015 21:41:06 -0400 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Tonight's Forecast]]> http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/first+alert_weather+1200.jpg

Tonight: Increasing clouds. Lows 56-61.

Tomorrow: A mix of clouds and sun, a bit humid. Spot p.m. shower possible. Highs in the middle- and upper-80s.

Monday: Lots of sunshine! Highs near 90 degrees.

Tuesday: Sunny. Highs near 90 degrees.

Wednesday: Mostly sunny and very humid. Highs in the lower-90s.

Thursday: Plentiful sunshine, hot and very humid. Highs in the lower-90s.

Friday: Sun and clouds. Less hot, less humid. Highs in the 80s.

Get your detailed First Alert 7-day forecast plus hour-by-hour weather and interactive radar by downloading the NBC Connecticut app.



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[Download the NBC Connecticut Weather App]]> Thu, 30 Jul 2015 16:38:29 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/NBCCTWEATHERAPP043013.jpg

 

The most accurate weather information in Connecticut is now available whenever and wherever you want it.

The NBC Connecticut weather app is available for download for iPhone, iPad and Android and it's free!

All you have to do is search NBC Connecticut or Connecticut weather in the App Store or in Google Play.

You can keep NBC Connecticut's powerful radar at your fingertips and even zoom in and out on your neighborhood.

Select to receive push notifications and you'll know when severe weather is moving your way.

Plus, the NBC Connecticut weather app provides hourly, daily and 10-day forecasts. You can even pinpoint your location via GPS for precise conditions near you.

Download and rate the NBC Connecticut Weather app today!

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<![CDATA[90-Degree Heat Possible Next Week]]> Fri, 28 Aug 2015 14:09:18 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Aug+28+weather+map.jpg

High pressure will deliver dry weather today with a few puffy cumulus clouds, especially in the higher terrain. Temperatures will peak near 80 degrees.

This weekend will be a fabulous close to August.

Saturday features mostly sunny skies with temperatures in the lower- and middle-80s.

A mix of sun and clouds is expected on Sunday as a frontal boundary washes out in northern New England. It will be dry, but the humidity will be noticable as temperatures peak in the middle- and upper-80s.

Next week a large, long-lived upper-level ridge sets up shop over much of the country. This means a very warm stretch of weather is ahead, with some days reaching ten degrees above the average high, which is roughly 80 degrees.

High temperatures through Thursday will be in the upper-80s to near 90 degrees inland. Along the coastline, with a sea breeze, temperatures will be a tad cooler in the middle- and upper-80s.
Monday features a mix of sun and clouds, then mostly sunny conditions return on Tuesday and Wednesday.

The tropical focus is currently on Tropical Storm Erika, the lone storm in the Atlantic Ocean.

Erika is tracking over the high terrain of the Dominican Republic and Haiti, where the highest mountains reach 10,000 feet above sea level. That is helping tear apart the bottom of the storm, while upper-level winds shear off the top of the storm.

As of midday on Friday, the storm circulation was west of the main thunderstorm activity. Erika might not survive as a tropical storm, but heavy rain is expected along the path of the system.
Florida should be concerned about the potential for flooding early next week.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Long Stretch of Dry Weather, Heat Builds Next Week]]> Wed, 26 Aug 2015 15:01:57 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/sunny+dry+weather+aug+26.jpg

The humidity is gone and that’s how it will be for days to come.

High pressure is slowing moving in from the west and that means sinking, dry air.

Puffy clouds will mix with sunshine for the remainder of today as temperatures peak in the mid-80s.

The average high temperature for today in the Hartford area is 81 degrees, while the average low is 60 degrees.

Thursday and Friday are likely the only two days with temperatures near or below average in the extended forecast.

Both days will feature plenty of sunshine with high temperatures in the upper-70s to near 80 degrees.

Morning low temperatures Thursday, Friday and Saturday mornings will be crisp and cool, in the mid- and upper-50s.

This weekend should be a fabulous close to August. A weak disturbance has the potential to slide through the region on Sunday, but at this point a mix of clouds and sun is expected, as opposed to mostly sunny skies.

Temperatures will be in the mid-80s this weekend with comfortable levels of humidity.

Early next week remains dry with a return to mostly sunny skies, though the heat really starts to build in. A ridge of high pressure over the eastern United States means a surge of late-summer heat for many in the region.

High temperatures will push 90 degrees on Monday and Tuesday.

The tropical focus is currently on Tropical Storm Erika, the lone storm in the Atlantic Ocean.

National Hurricane Center projections bring beneficial rain to Puerto Rico before strengthening the storm into a category one hurricane Monday morning as it moves over Miami, Florida.

The difference between Danny, which died, and Erika, is that the atmospheric conditions ahead of Erika are much more favorable for development. There is less wind shear, which means the storm won’t be torn apart.

It’s certainly not a lock that the storm hits Florida early next week, but the potential should be noted. If you have any friends or family in Florida it wouldn’t hurt to make sure they have an eye on the storm to keep abreast of the latest information.

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<![CDATA[First Alert Weather Day Today Over Storm Threat]]> Tue, 25 Aug 2015 05:56:32 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Aug+24+Model+RPM4+Precip+Clouds+Floater.jpg

A cold front moving in is ushering in the threat of strong to severe storms Tuesday, and NBC Connecticut has declared a First Alert Weather Day.

The humidity will continues and a few thunderstorms are possible in the morning. Another round is possible in the afternoon.

There is a threat of small hail, gusty winds, heavy rain and an isolated tornado.

Much less humid air filters in by Wednesday and there will be plenty of sunshine.

If you spot severe weather and can safely take photos, share them by emailing shareit@nbcconnecticut, upload them here or tweet us @NBCConnecticut.


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<![CDATA[Showers Possible Sunday]]> Sat, 22 Aug 2015 18:34:09 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/82215sweeping_radar_live_ct.jpg

After sunny weather throughout the day Saturday, showers are possible overnight into Sunday.

With the skies clouding up into the evening on Saturday, there could be a few late night showers.

On Sunday, there will likely be a lot of clouds with a few showers. Highs will be near 80.

Come Monday, it will be partly sunny with a possible isolated shower.

Tuesday will likely bring thunderstorms and showers with high temperatures in the lower 80s.

It will be much drier Wednesday to Friday with bountiful sunshine.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Rainy Morning, Several Crashes]]> Fri, 21 Aug 2015 10:18:13 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/August+21+sweeping_radar_live_ct.jpg

Rain caused several problems during the morning commute on Friday and Interstate 84 West in Hartford was closed for awhile after a tractor-trailer jackknifed.

Most of the state got rain this morning, including some downpours.

Rain continues to fall in some areas and pop-up showers are expected this afternoon, according to NBC Connecticut meteorologist Bob Maxon.

During the rain, there was a three-car crash on Interstate 91 South by 95 in New Haven and a two-car crash  on the Merritt Parkway Southbound by exit 42 in Westport that had traffic backed up to exit 46 in Fairfield.

There were rollover crashes on Route 315 at Quarry Road in Simsbury, on Interstate 95 North by exit 14 in Norwalk and on Interstate 84 East in Hartford.

Three adults were in the car that flipped over in Norwalk at 6:46 a.m. after hitting a rock wall and officials from the fire department had to extricate one person who was pinned in the car.

Paramedics transported the victim to Norwalk Hospital. The injuries are not believed to be life-threatening.

There was also a spinout on Interstate 691 East in Meriden, at exit 8.


 


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<![CDATA[Devastating 1955 Flood Happened 60 Year Ago Today]]> Wed, 19 Aug 2015 15:57:24 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/RepAm1+1955+Flood+crop.jpg

The 1955 flood was arguably Connecticut’s greatest natural disaster in modern times. Two hurricanes brushed by southern New England in a week’s time, dropping an exceptional amount of water across parts of Connecticut and Massachusetts. Tropical Storm Connie and Tropical Storm Diane resulted in over two feet of rain in parts of the Northwest Hills and Berkshires.

The record rainfall sent rivers raging into towns and cities across the state. The Naugatuck, Farmington, and Quinebaug Rivers – along with their tributaries – raged through valleys on the morning of August 19, 1955. Winsted, Thomaston, Waterbury, Ansonia, Farmington and Putnam were just some of the towns devastated.

The flooding on the Naugatuck River began upstream in Winsted when the Mad River exploded from its banks, destroying downtown Winsted. The surge of water continued downstream into Torrington, Thomaston, Waterbury, Naugatuck and Ansonia, destroying hundreds and hundreds of homes and factories. Dozens of people drowned as the flood moved south while hundreds waited to be rescued on their roofs.

After the Naugatuck River receded, Waterbury looked “War torn. You couldn’t believe that little river, that was nothing, was a ripple, could do that. You saw debris and furniture and suitcases and just overwhelming. You just didn’t expect something like that in our little town,” Waterbury resident Barbara Genovese said.

In Putnam, the Belding-Hemingway Magnesium factory exploded in a spectacular fire, illuminating the night sky for miles, after the Quinebaug River came out of its banks.

All told, more than $200 million in damage was done (in 1955 dollars) across the state and 90 people were killed.

After the flood, a series of flood control measures were put into place to ensure a flood like 1955 doesn’t happen again. The large Thomaston Dam on the Naugatuck River is one of the largest flood control measures erected by the Army Corps of Engineers.

Learn more:

Read more on Ryan Hanrahan's blog 
See the Waterbury Republican-American's extensive coverage
The Connecticut State Library page on the Connecticut Floods of 1955
Northeast River Forecast Center Page on the flood
 



Photo Credit: Republican American
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<![CDATA[Heat Wave Continues, Pop-Up Storm Possible]]> Tue, 18 Aug 2015 14:48:35 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Augist+18+Model+HRRR+Precip+Clouds+Floater.jpg

The year’s second heat wave is underway and today could very well be day four with temperatures expected to soar into the lower-90s.

Hazy sunshine is starting to mix with puffy cumulus clouds. While there isn’t a major source of lift or even strong winds in the atmosphere, pop-up storms will form in northern Connecticut as a sea breeze front lifts north.

As of 1 p.m., a few downpours had already flared up in the northern half of the state.

Any storms that form will be slow-moving but the severe threat is very low.

Tomorrow starts with low clouds, patchy fog and areas of drizzle. Once the sun goes to work, however, the day will turn out dry with a mix of sun and clouds and temperatures in the upper-80s.

[[273570711,C]]

More numerous showers are expected on Thursday as a cold front approaches. There will be more clouds than sun with temperatures in the lower- to middle-80s.

The cold front finally pushes through the state on Friday, bringing a line of showers and thunderstorms, especially earlier in the day. High temperatures will be near 80 degrees.

This weekend looks mainly dry through there will be an abundance of clouds as the front gets hung up just south and east of Connecticut. Each day there can be an isolated shower with temperatures in the lower-80s.

Early next week, the stalled front finally washes out and yields drier weather with much more sunshine.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 


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<![CDATA[Cooling Centers Open ]]> Mon, 17 Aug 2015 10:36:06 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/sunshine3.jpg

Today could be the second heat wave of the summer as temperatures are expected to climb into the 90s.

Middletown and Simsbury have already opened cooling centers.

Middletown (Monday, Aug. 17 and Tuesday, Aug. 18)

  • Municipal Building Council Chamber, 245 deKoven Drive, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Middletown Police Department lobby, 222 Main Street, 24 hours
  • Russell Library, 123 Broad Street, Monday and Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • Elderly citizens are advised to use the Senior Center, 150 William Street, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The Middletown fire, South and Westfield fire districts will open the following fire hydrants Monday, Aug. 17 and Tuesday, Aug. 18:

  • The Highlands Crescent Drive bus stop, 12 to 4 p.m.
  • Maplewood Terrace, 2 to 5 p.m.
  • Summer Hill Road and Woodbury Circle, 2 to 5 p.m.
  • MacDonough School, 12 to 3 p.m., 6 to 8 p.m.
  • Santangelo Circle, 12 to 3 p.m.
  • Daddario Road, 6 to 8 p.m.

Simsbury (Monday, Aug. 17 through Wednesday, Aug. 19)

  • Simsbury Public Library, 725 Hopmeadow Street (lower-level entrance), open from 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday to Wednesday.
  • Eno Memorial Hall (senior center), 754 Hopmeadow Street, open from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
  • More information about staying safe in extreme heat is available by calling the town's Social Services Department at 860-658-3283.

Officials from Stamford have warned residents to keep an eye out for these heat stroke signs and symptoms:

  • If someone has a body temperature that's 105 degrees or more
  • Hot and dry skin with red spots
  • Confusion mentally
  • Someone has lost consciousness
  • Someone is convulsing

People at the greatest risk of heat-related illnesses, according to Stamford officials, include:

  • Infants
  • Young children
  • Mentally ill individuals
  • People who are physically ill
  • Anyone with heart disease or high blood pressure

You should call 911 or go to a hospital emergency room if you are experiencing those symptoms. Also, make sure to get the person out of the sun and use water to help the individual cool off.

Call 211 or check 211ct.org for information on other shelters and alternative resources to beat the heat in Connecticut towns.

Officials in various towns are advising residents to take the following precautions in the extreme heat:

  • Stay hydrated throughout the day and avoid dehydrating drinks containing alcohol or caffeine.
  • Stay inside if you can or minimize your exposure to the sun. If you do venture outside, put sunblock with an SPF of 30 or higher on.
  • Wear clothing that's lightweight or loose-fitting.
  • Stay in an air-conditioned place like a library, mall or movie theater during the hottest peaks of the day.
  • While electric fans may make you more comfortable when it's hot out, they will not ward off possible heat-related illnesses in high 90-degree weather.
  • Don't leave children, senior citizens or pets in a vehicle that is closed or leave pets outside for a long duration.
  • Check on elderly family members and neighbors.
  • Have your family doctor's phone number posted next to your phone at home or easily accessible in your cell phone.
  • Limit outdoor activity to early morning and evening hours.
  • Cut down on physical activity.
  • Drink two to four glasses of cold, non-alchoholic fluids an hour if you choose to exercise. Sports beverages replace salt and minerals you lose when you sweat, so if you're on a low-salt diet, check with your doctor before having a sports drink.
  • Rest often in the shade.
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat to protect yourself from the son and stay cool, wear sunglasses and put sunscreen on that's SPF or highers.
  • Eat well-balanced and regular light meals.
  • Stay on your home's lowest floor.

Bridgeport's emergency management website and downloadable extreme heat guide have more information on how to stay cool and beat the heat.

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<![CDATA[Northeast Regional Beach Forecast for Aug. 15 and 16]]> Sat, 15 Aug 2015 14:00:29 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/rocky+neck+state+park+beach.JPG

The third weekend of August is here and a beautiful weekend is on tap. A cold front approaches on Saturday, but washes out and gives way to high pressure. That means most stay dry, though there can be a shower in coastal Maine.

High pressure takes command on Sunday and it will make for one of the nicest beach days of the year. Temperatures will be well into the 80s with little humidity and unlimited sunshine.

Long Island Sound
Saturday: A mix of sun and clouds. Highs: Middle-80s.
Sunday: Unlimited sunshine! Highs: Middle-80s.

Newport
Saturday: A mix of sun and clouds. Highs: Lower-80s.
Sunday: Full sunshine. Highs: Middle-80s.

Cape Cod
Saturday: A mix of sun and clouds. Highs: Lower-80s.
Sunday: Unlimited sunshine! Highs: Lower-80s.

Jersey Shore
Saturday: A mix of sun and clouds. Highs: Middle-80s.
Sunday: Full sunshine. Highs: Middle-80s.

Coastal Maine
Saturday: Clouds and sun, an isolated shower possible. Highs: Middle-80s.
Sunday: Unlimited sunshine! Highs: Middle-80s.

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<![CDATA[Scattered Storms Possible Saturday]]> Thu, 13 Aug 2015 15:26:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Aug+13+2015+Custom+Map+2.jpg

Dry, comfortable weather is in place and here to stay through tomorrow!

An upper-level low passing by to the north will spark off showers in Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine but for Connecticut it just means a handful of clouds.

Sunshine and a few puffy cumulus clouds will be the story today with temperatures in the lower-80s.

Tomorrow is another weather winner with lots of sunshine, temperatures in the middle-80s and no humidity.

The next chance of active weather arrives Saturday, but it won’t be a washout.

A cold front diving south out of Canada will spark off scattered showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon and evening Saturday. The humidity will be noticeable with temperatures in the upper-80s.

Most of the activity will likely be north and west of Connecticut, so northwestern areas of the state stand the best chance of getting wet. Any storms have the potential to produce downpours and lightning, but the severe threat is very low.

The front washes out and doesn’t drop the temperatures much but it does get rid of any sign of humidity. Sunday will be hot with lots of sun and temperatures in the lower-90s.

Temperatures continue to climb on Monday as a Bermuda high-pressure system sets up and pumps in the heat from the south. Lower- to middle-90s are in the cards and it will still be dry with lots of sunshine.

Tuesday could make the stretch an official heat wave with a third 90 degree day. Showers and thunderstorms are possible as a cold front approaches.

The humidity ramps up on Wednesday and with the cold front still in the vicinity, more showers and thunderstorms are possible.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 

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<![CDATA[Pop-Up Shower Possible During Mostly Sunny Day]]> Wed, 12 Aug 2015 13:05:03 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/sunshine3.jpg

After beneficial rain yesterday, much improved weather has arrived and it will stick around for a while, though there could still be a pop-up shower.

While the cold front is now east of the region, an upper-level disturbance means there is a cold pool of air aloft and the heating of the surface results in instability.

Sun will mix with puffy clouds this afternoon and there can be a pop-up sprinkle or shower. Not a big deal and most will stay dry. Temperature will reach the lower-80s.

Tomorrow features unlimited sunshine as high pressure builds in from the west. Temperatures again will be in the lower-80s, which is considered seasonable for this time of year. The humidity will remain absent!

Friday is another weather winner with lots of sunshine, temperatures in the middle-80s and no humidity.

The next chance of active weather arrives Saturday, but it won’t be a washout.

A cold front diving south out of Canada will spark off scattered showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon and evening Saturday. The humidity will be noticeable with temperatures in the middle-80s.

The front doesn’t drop the temperatures much but it does wash away any sign of humidity. Sunday will be spectacular with lots of sun and temperatures in the middle-80s.

A growing signal exists for increasing heat early next week, with temperatures soaring into the upper-80s to perhaps 90 degrees by the middle part of the week.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Storm Threat Diminishes]]> Tue, 11 Aug 2015 18:00:04 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/aug+11+evening+radar.jpg

The threat of severe weather in Connecticut has diminished after heavy rain knocked out power to thousands of homes and businesses Tuesday morning.

Scattered showers are possible this evening, along with an isolated thunderstorm, but new data shows storms are not likely to become severe. The limiting factor that is prohibiting widespread severe weather is a lack of sunshine.

More than an inch of rain fell in several areas earlier, including West Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, Meriden and Bristol. Heavy rain brought down trees and wires, causing some 3,000 outages. Stratford Town Hall is closed for the day as a result.

Heavy rain caused issues during the morning commute, and several crashes were reported around the state, including one on Interstate 84 westbound in Waterbury.

Today's rainfall will actually be beneficial, since both Bridgeport and Windsor Locks climate sites have a yearly rainfall deficit of more than 4 inches of rain, which works out to be roughly one month’s worth of precipitation.

This storm will take a sizable chunk out of that deficit and help with some of the lawns that are in need of liquid as summer enters its later stage.

Wednesday brings much-improved weather, but the day isn’t completely dry for everyone. There could be a brief, stray shower. Temperatures on Wednesday will be near 80 degrees and the humidity will once again be absent.

Thursday and Friday feature sunshine as a sprawling area of high pressure builds in from the Mid-Atlantic states. The lack of humidity will continue with temperatures in the lower-80s.

An early glance at the weekend shows a decent forecast for outdoor activities. A cold front comes through on Saturday and results in scattered thunderstorms, but it looks like a fairly quick mover and that means Sunday should feature sunshine with temperatures in the mid-80s.


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<![CDATA[Soaker Expected Tuesday After Sun for Little League Regionals]]> Sun, 09 Aug 2015 17:49:33 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/81915+Custom+Map+5+1200.jpg

The nice weather will hold Monday for the start of the Little League regionals in Bristol, but be prepared for a soaker on Tuesday.

It's supposed to pour all day, dropping more than an inch of rain on the state.

But the rain is much needed to water that browning grass and your plants.

The rain is expected to last from daybreak to sunset on Tuesday. The temperature will be cool and in the 70s.

There could be some pop-up showers on Wednesday, but otherwise, nice weather is expected to return for the remainder of the week.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Warmer Climate and Disease-Carrying Pests]]> Sun, 09 Aug 2015 11:19:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Climate+Central+Mosquitoes+1200.jpg

Higher temperatures mean more favorable conditions for disease-carrying pests in Connecticut, such as ticks and mosquitoes.

Ticks carry Lyme disease and mosquitoes carry West Nile virus, so any increase in the populations of these pests is cause for concern.

In the Hartford area, for example, the mean annual temperature has increased one point five degrees Fahrenheit since 1950, from 49.5 degrees to 51 degrees in 2014.

A similar trend exists in the Bridgeport area, which is the official climate site on the Connecticut shoreline. Since the halfway point of the previous century, the mean annual temperature has risen one point eight degrees Fahrenheit from 51.2 degrees to 53 degrees in 2014.

Mosquitos spread West Nile virus, and one species called the Asian tiger mosquito is particularly invasive.

According to a 2013 report by Rochlin et al., the amount of land suitable for the Asian tiger mosquito to survive is expected to increase from five to 16 percent in the next two decades.

Making clear the Asian tiger mosquito is known to have substantial biting activity and a high potential to spread disease, the report indicates populations currently exist across portions of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Long Island and coastal southwestern Connecticut.

Under a scenario with a moderate increase in carbon dioxide emissions and thus continued warming of the earth, the study projects the majority of Connecticut will be dealing with this invasive species by the year 2039, including the entire Connecticut River Valley.

According to Climate Central, mosquitoes have a high mortality rate when temperatures are outside the range of 50 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Additionally, relative humidity below 42 percent is unfavorable for mosquitoes.

Connecticut mosquitoes aren’t the only pests that benefit from warmer air.

Ticks, of course, are responsible for the spread of Lyme disease.

More than a decade ago, a study by Brownstein et al. surveyed the expected changes in tick habitats across eastern North America. While a decrease in the amount of land suitable for ticks was projected for the 2020s, the long-term expectation was alarming.

By the 2080s, the net increase in suitable land for ticks is projected to be 68.9%, with major jogs north into Canada.

With ticks in more areas, more people have the potential to come into contact with them.

“Human cases of Lyme disease, and other tick-associated illnesses, Babesiosis and Anaplasmosis, have also increased during the last few decades in the state, for which climate-related factors are among the contributing factors,” said Dr. Goudarz Molaei, a research scientist at Connecticut’s Center for Vector Biology and Zoonotic Diseases.

A warming climate may mean more than just expanded territory for ticks.

Goudarz says “warmer winter seasons could provide a favorable condition for ticks to successfully overwinter and emerge in the spring. Apart from some extreme and unusual conditions, we have witnessed shorter winter seasons and warmer temperatures during the last few decades or so in the northeastern U.S. including Connecticut.”

Though an increase in Lyme disease reports is likely in part due to increasing deer populations, more ticks in more areas is likely part of the equation, according to Climate Central. It expects the upward trend to continue with a warming climate since warmer weather is more supportive of tick populations.

More ticks and a longer mosquito season are just some of the implications from climate change in Connecticut, but other implications often receive more attention.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Northeast Regional Beach Forecast for August 8-9]]> Sun, 09 Aug 2015 11:22:19 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/8715+Beach+and+Boating+Weekend+SNE+1200.jpg

A large ocean storm will miss the northeast to the southeast this weekend, and that means mostly dry weather is expected. The most sunshine will be found on the Jersey shore and along Long Island Sound on Saturday, while and isolated shower can’t be ruled out on Cape Cod and in coastal Maine.

The ocean storm stays well offshore Sunday, but a dip in the jet stream will enhance the lift in the atmosphere. That means more in the way of clouds, but still some sun. There can be a shower in eastern areas, such as Cape Cod and coastal Maine.

Long Island Sound
Saturday: Mostly sunny and comfortable. Highs: Lower-80s.
Sunday: A mix of sun and clouds. Highs: Lower-80s.

Newport
Saturday: Dry with plenty of sunshine. Highs: Lower-80s.
Sunday: A mix of sun and clouds. Highs: Upper-70s.

Cape Cod
Saturday: An abundance of clouds, some sun. A stray shower is possible. Highs: Upper-70s.
Sunday: More clouds than sun. An isolated shower is possible. Highs: Lower-70s.

Jersey Shore
Saturday: Lots of sunshine! Highs: Upper-70s.
Sunday: Partly cloudy, dry. Highs: Lower-80s.

Coastal Maine
Saturday: An abundance of clouds, some sun. An isolated shower is possible. Highs: Upper-70s.
Sunday: More clouds than sun. A stray shower is possible. Highs: Lower-80s.

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<![CDATA[Pleasant Weekend Ahead]]> Fri, 07 Aug 2015 15:09:08 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/August+8+weather+image.jpg

Comfortable weather continues here as the second weekend of August has arrived.

High temperatures will be in the lower- to middle-80s across the state with no humidity.

A storm picks up steam off the Carolina coast and heads north and east this weekend. The track will be hundreds of miles off the southern New England coast and therefore miss Connecticut.
Tomorrow will be dry with partly cloudy skies and temperatures will be in the lower-80s.

Sunday is also a dry day, but more clouds than Saturday are expected. A moist onshore flow from the north and east will shuttle in clouds. While it won’t be overcast, the day is likely to feature more clouds than Saturday.

Temperatures will be in the lower- and middle-80s on Sunday with the continued lack of humidity.

One or two days without humidity in early August would be reasonable, but this long stretch is odd.
Monday will bring mostly sunny skies with temperatures right near seasonable levels in the lower- and middle-80s. The humidity will increase, especially late in the day.

Beyond Monday, the weather pattern turns unsettled.

Showers are likely on Tuesday as a storm system moves through the region. It will be humid with occasional downpours. With the cloud cover, temperatures will be stuck in the upper-70s.

While some showers might linger early on Wednesday, the trend will be improvement later in the day as drier weather works into Connecticut. Temperatures return to the 80s.

High pressure builds in late week, yielding another impressive stretch of weather for middle-August. Temperatures will be seasonable, in the lower-80s, with no humidity and plenty of sunshine to go around.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 

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<![CDATA[Storm Likely to Miss Connecticut This Weekend]]> Thu, 06 Aug 2015 15:16:56 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/August+6+custom+map+for+weather.jpg

Sun will mix with high clouds today as temperatures only peak in the lower-80s.

High pressure over the northern Great Lakes region has enough influence on New England to keep the weather dry both today and tomorrow.

Temperatures will remain below average tomorrow with highs reaching near 80 degrees.

A storm will pick up steam off the Carolina coast and head north and east this weekend. The consensus is that the track will be hundreds of miles off the southern New England coast and therefore miss in terms of rain.

Saturday looks dry with partly cloudy skies as the storm remains well out over the Atlantic Ocean. Temperatures will be near 80 degrees.

Even brighter skies are likely on Sunday as the storm pulls away, with mostly sunny to partly cloudy conditions anticipated. The humidity remains low with high temperatures in the lower-80s.

Coastal storms aren’t typical in the summer months but they happen occasionally. The jet stream currently has plenty of kinks in it; therefore, the pattern is favorable for a storm such as the one that will pass by well south and east of the region this weekend.

Beyond this weekend, the weather pattern remains unsettled.

A lull between storms likely arrives on Monday, meaning lots of sunshine and temperatures in the 80s. However, given the jet stream continues to have plenty of troughs and ridges, another storm is possible on Tuesday into Wednesday.

Some indications are the storm in the middle part of next week tracks to the west of Connecticut, which would mean very moist air flows into Connecticut. Storms would be possible in that scenario.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Storm Could Bring Showers This Weekend]]> Wed, 05 Aug 2015 21:05:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/august+5+weekend+storm+threat.jpg

Comfortable levels of humidity are here to stick around for quite a while, but the weather will remain unsettled.

Increasing clouds are expected this afternoon and there can be an isolated shower or storm. Temperatures will peak in the mid-80s.

Tomorrow features tons of sunshine as high pressure noses into the region from the northwest. High temperatures will be in the lower-80s and the air will be exceptionally dry.

Clouds increase on Friday as a warm front will be to the south and a storm will be getting its act together over the Virginias.

Temperatures will be stuck in the upper-70s to near 80 degrees. This weekend is a different story as a storm picks up steam off the Carolina coast.

The storm will track to the north and east, likely passing pretty close to Nantucket. This means an abundance of clouds for both Saturday and Sunday.

Additionally, rain is possible. Saturday looks dry early on but rain inches closer, especially in southern Connecticut, as the storm nears later in the day. Sunday looks mainly cloudy.

Temperatures both days this weekend will be stuck in the 70s to near 80 degrees with the storm nearby.

Coastal storms aren’t typical in the summer months but they happen occasionally. The jet stream currently has plenty of kinks in it; therefore, the pattern is favorable for a storm such as the one that is expected this weekend.

Beyond this weekend, the weather pattern remains unsettled.
A lull between storms likely arrives on Monday, meaning lots of sunshine and temperatures in the 80s. However, given the jet stream continues to have plenty of troughs and ridges, another storm is possible Tuesday into Wednesday.

Some indications are the storm in the middle part of next week tracks to the west of Connecticut, which would mean very moist air flows into Connecticut. Storms would be possible in that scenario.

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<![CDATA[Chance of Isolated Thunderstorms, Showers]]> Wed, 05 Aug 2015 09:39:02 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/8515sweeping_radar_live_ct.jpg

There is a chance of isolated showers and thunderstorms afternoon into early evening.

The heat and humidity have been pushed out to sea for now, but we can expect a mix of sun and clouds today with a passing shower possible.

A quick thundershower is possible in a few towns between about 2 and 5 p.m., but nothing severe is expected and they are expected to be very scattered and isolated in nature.

Fair weather is in the forecast as we move toward the weekend.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Durham Woman May Be Among Those Hurt in R.I. Storm]]> Tue, 04 Aug 2015 21:13:03 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/6P_P_RI_STORM_DAMAGE_1200x675_498574403799.jpg

Connecticut residents were caught in the fray when a fierce storm ripped through a Rhode Island campground early Tuesday, injuring nearly a dozen people.

Officials said straight-line winds tore through the Burlingame State Park campground. Falling trees crushed campers and tents, sending two people to the hospital with concussions.

David Sassi, of Springfield, Massachusetts, said one was a woman from Durham who was camping with her family at the site next to his.

"The tree branch fell on her head when she was in the tent. Came out of nowhere," he said.

Sassi said he watched as paramedics cut the tree with a chainsaw before rushing the woman to the hospital. The family quickly packed up and did not return.

Eight other people were treated for minor injuries at the campground, including two children.

Local officials called the storm unsual.

"Summer thunderstorms are quite prevalent; however, they’re usually not severe. We may have a severe storm once every three years. This was quite severe this morning," said Kevin Gallup, emergency manager of Charlestown, Rhode Island, where the campground is located.

Gallup called it a short-duration, high-impact storm. Fifty large trees fell throughout Charlestown, knocking out power to 3,500 people, according to Gallup.

 

Crews worked all day to pick up debris as families tried to dry out all their clothes on air mattresses and clean up the mess the storm left around their campsite.

"Our pop-up was flipped upside down and flew over the trees. Everything was everywhere, glass (was) breaking," said Ellington resident Stacey Page.

Page's father was sleeping in a tent outside her camper. Fifteen minutes after he sought shelter in his brother’s camper, a large tree came crashing down, hovering inches above his tent.

"I think my angels were looking out for me today," said James Kology, of Bristol.

Not everyone waited for the storm to pass. Several people ran to their cars and left the campground as the storm raged.

"Limbs started falling, smashing every other car in between us," said Steven Fitzgerald of Hinsdale, Massachusetts.

Rhode Island State Parks & Recreation Chief Bob Paquette said he did not expect power to be fully restored until midnight.

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<![CDATA[Fierce Storm Topples Trees in Stonington]]> Tue, 04 Aug 2015 19:55:32 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Stonington00000000.jpg

After a fierce storm toppled trees and power lines this morning, Stonington police put up a barricade on Greenhaven Road west of Pawcatuck and the state line.

Even after Eversource restored power to thousands of customers in Stonington, a tree crew was waiting along Greenhaven at 5 p.m. for the power company to de-energize lines and clean up oil from a transformer.

"They called us in at 10," said Dan Humbert of Lucas Tree. "Storms that come in, trees fall, so they call us in, any time of the night, when they need us."

He heard the wind and the thunder that roared through town last night.

"Wind gusts that were unbelievable," said Dan Berube, who said the storm found its way through an open bathroom window. "Water was going horizontal into the hallway and the bathroom's nine foot deep."

People around him agreed the storms are getting more and more intense.

"I've never seen this kind of stuff in Connecticut," said Jan Pizanowski.

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<![CDATA[Chance of Pop-Up Storms After Wild Weather Sweeps State]]> Tue, 04 Aug 2015 17:43:59 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Trees+down+in+Stonington+1200.jpg

Wild storms swept the state early Tuesday morning, causing damage, bringing down trees and wires and possibly resulting in one death when a tree came crashing down onto a car in Groton, killing the driver.

Thousands of Eversource customers around the state remained in the dark into the afternoon, including nearly 50 percent of the town of Stonington. Most outages have been restored.

It’s not yet clear if lightning is to blame for a condo fire in Groton, which started around the time a thunderstorm moved through.

Storms also appear to have prompted the closure of Route 6 in Bethel, between Weed Road and Old Hawleyville Road, after a tree and wires came down earlier today. The road has since reopened.

Route 85 in Hebron was also closed this morning after a tree and wires came down.

Although several Connecticut towns sustained damage, the worst of the storm hit Rhode Island, Cape Cod and the North Shore in Massachusetts.

As the day goes on, temperatures will be in the 80s to near 90. A couple pop-up storms are possible within the next hour or two, but most of the state will remain dry.

A severe thunderstorm watch issued for Litchfield County this evening has been canceled.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Tornado Confirmed in New Hampshire]]> Fri, 31 Jul 2015 22:40:14 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/new+hampshire+tornado+crop.jpg

Thunderstorms rolled through New England yesterday and produced one confirmed tornado in New Hampshire.

Connecticut escaped the storms with no damage, though a few areas such as West Hartford experienced poor drainage flooding.
It was different story in New Hampshire.

The National Weather Service based in Gray, Maine on Friday sent an investigator to Warner, New Hampshire to investigate storm damage that occurred on Thursday, July 30.

A public information statement released by the weather service following the investigation says an EF0 tornado with maximum winds of 75 mph hit Warner.

No tornado warning was issued, nor was a severe thunderstorm warning in effect.

It was around 5:53 p.m. when the tornado struck without warning in the town along Interstate 89 in western Merrimack County. It wasn’t on the ground long, only for 0.4 miles.

According a damage survey conducted by a National Weather Service meteorologist, the most significant damage occurred when the tornado snapped or uprooted about 25 trees and tore a portion of the roof off a large storage structure.

A 12-by-24 foot section of the roof was discovered in the woods not far from the storage building, but not all of the missing section of roof was found.

This is the first tornado recorded in New Hampshire this year, and the first to hit Merrimack County, New Hampshire since July 24, 2008. It was only last year that a waterspout was confirmed over Lake Winnipesaukee to the north and east of Warner.



Photo Credit: NWS Gray, Maine]]>
<![CDATA[Your Weekend Beach Forecast]]> Fri, 31 Jul 2015 22:06:12 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Hammonasset+1200.jpg

High pressure with enough of an influence on the northeast will make for a mainly dry Saturday with a mix of sun and clouds.

An upper-level disturbance cruising across northern portions of the region will spark off storms, but they will be few and far between. Some may reach the beaches.

Given the trajectory of the disturbance on Saturday, coastal Maine stands the best chance of a storm while the Jersey Shore stays dry.

Sunday is the pick of the weekend because the forecast is dry for all! High pressure moves closer to the region from the southwest and exerts its influence in the form of sunshine!

Both weekend days feature low levels of humidity. Overall, it will be an enjoyable beach weekend from Wildwood, New Jersey on north to Old Orchard Beach, Maine.

Long Island Sound
Saturday: Partly cloudy with an afternoon thunderstorm possible. Highs: Mid-80s.
Sunday: Lots of sunshine. Highs: Mid-80s.

Newport
Saturday: A mix of sun and clouds with a stray storm possible in the afternoon. Highs: Mid-80s.
Sunday: Plenty of sun. Highs: Lower-80s.

Cape Cod
Saturday: A thunderstorm possible in the afternoon, otherwise partly cloudy. Highs: Mid-80s.
Sunday: Mostly sunny with just a few puffy clouds. Highs: Lower-80s.

Jersey Shore
Saturday: A mix of sun and clouds. Dry! Highs: Upper-80s.
Sunday: Plenty of sun. Highs: Mid-80s.

Coastal Maine
Saturday: Partly cloudy with an afternoon thunderstorm possible. Highs: Upper-80s.
Sunday: Lots of sunshine. Highs: Mid-80s.



Photo Credit: LeAnne Gendreau]]>
<![CDATA[Refreshing Weather to Last Through Weekend]]> Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:39:43 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/July+31+weather.jpg

Far more comfortable air has moved into Connecticut and it’s here to stay through the weekend!

The cold front that passed through yesterday is now over the Atlantic Ocean, but a dramatic change in temperature is not in the forecast. The big change is the drop in humidity.

Nearly unlimited sunshine is expected for the balance of Friday, with only a handful of puffy clouds over the high terrain. Temperatures will be in the middle- and upper-80s.

Great sleeping weather is anticipated tonight as temperatures fall to near 60 degrees.

Tomorrow isn’t completely dry, as there can be a stray storm in the afternoon as a disturbance moves by to the north and east, but most areas will stay dry. Temperatures will be in the middle- and upper-80s.

Sunday is the pick of the weekend, with mostly sunny conditions and temperatures again in the middle- and upper-80s. It would make a great beach day as water temperatures in Long Island Sound are well into the 70s!

Another cold front approaches on Monday and will provide the lift as the humidity ramps up and the sun increases the amount of instability. Strong to severe storms are a possibility but it’s too far out to etch anything into stone.

The front isn’t a fast mover, so more showers and thunderstorms are in the forecast on Tuesday. It will be humid with temperatures in the 80s.

Wednesday looks pleasant with a mix clouds and sun in the wake of the cold front, but Thursday is a toss-up. Some indications are for a rainstorm, while others show high pressure building in.

For now, the Thursday forecast is for a chance of showers with temperatures near 80 degrees.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Beautiful Weather to End the Work Week]]> Fri, 31 Jul 2015 08:43:54 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/beach+and+boating+forecast+july+31.JPG

Friday is a splendid end to the work week. Not only will the humidity be gone, but lots of sunshine is also expected and it will still be very warm, with temperatures well into the 80s.

Temperatures will reach about 80 around lunchtime and climb into the mid-80s during the afternoon. Lower humidity will make for much more comfortable weather after three days of oppressive humidity and our first heat wave of the year.

Temperatures reached 93 on Tuesday, 95 on Wednesday and 90 on Thursday.

A pattern change is responsible for the more comfortable conditions that arrive today and last several days. The jet stream will sink south and suppress the high heat and humidity to the southeastern United States.

A mix of sun and clouds is anticipated on Saturday. Given the nature of the upper-level flow, there can be an isolated storm later in the day. Temperatures will be in the upper-80s to near 90 degrees.

Sunday looks to be the pick of the weekend at this point, with mostly sunny conditions and temperatures again in the mid-80s to near 90 degrees.

Early next week looks unsettled with the chance of a shower or thunderstorm Monday and Tuesday with temperatures in the mid- to upper-80s.

Send your weather photos to us at shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.

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<![CDATA[Storms Bring Heavy Rain, Flooding, Lots of Lightning]]> Thu, 30 Jul 2015 19:21:48 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/trout+brook+drive+weha+flooding+edit.jpg

A line of storms brought torriential rain, lots of lightning and thunder and even some flooding to parts of the state Thursday evening.

Although some parts of the state are still seeing rain, storms have weakened as they moved east across Connecticut. Flood warnings and flood advisories issued for the western and northern parts of the state have expired.

Some areas saw minor flooding, including Bishop's Corner and Trout Brook Drive in West Hartford. Lightning struck a condo complex in Danbury, sparking a three-alarm fire that damaged nine units.

Western areas could see a few breaks of sun as the clearing line moves in. Storms are expected to move out around 8 or 9 p.m.

Connecticut recorded its first official heat wave of 2015 as temperatures at Bradley International Airport reached 90 degrees for the third day in a row, but the air is cooling as storms move in, and we're seeing temperatures between 75 and 83 degrees statewide now.

What's Ahead

Tonight will be more comfortable, with lows in the 60s to near 70 degrees.

Friday is a splendid end to the work week. Not only will the humidity be gone, but lots of sunshine is also expected and it will still be very warm, with temperatures well into the 80s.

A pattern change is responsible for the more comfortable conditions that arrive on Friday and last several days. The jet stream will sink south and suppress the high heat and humidity to the southeastern United States.

A mix of sun and clouds is anticipated on Saturday. Given the nature of the upper-level flow, there can be an isolated storm later in the day. Temperatures will be in the upper-80s to near 90 degrees.

Sunday looks to be the pick of the weekend at this point, with mostly sunny conditions and temperatures again in the mid-80s to near 90 degrees.

Early next week looks unsettled with the chance of a shower or thunderstorm Monday and Tuesday with temperatures in the mid- to upper-80s.

Send your weather photos to us at shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: Michael Slifer
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Norwich Issues Power Alert as Temperatures Climb]]> Tue, 28 Jul 2015 17:36:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Sun_Trees_Heat_Generic.jpg

Norwich Public Utilities has issued a power alert this week, urging customers to conserve energy as temperatures climb into the 90s.

The utility company is asking residents to conserve power between noon and 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, which could amount to the state's first official heat wave of 2015.

This week's extreme heat and humidity will cause the demand for electricity to spike as customers work to cool their homes. This could tax the town's electrical infrastructure, according to the utility company.

Officials with Norwich Public Utilities are asking that customers take the following steps to conserve power this week:

  • Set a central air conditioning system to 73 degrees and only run window units when you are home.
  • Wait until after 6 p.m., when temperatures begin to drop, to use major appliances such as dishwashers or dryers.
  • Cut down on the use of heat-generating appliances – including computers, curling irons, hair dryers, stereos and televisions – before 6 p.m.
  • Use a microwave, stove or outdoor grill instead of an oven when possible
  • Install energy-efficient light bulbs, which generate much less heat than traditional lighting.
  • Close curtains or blinds to keep the sun out and minimize heat coming into your home.

Conserving electricity will also help minimize your yearly electric bill, since the company's annual rates are based on "peak days," according to the utility company.



Photo Credit: NBC 5 News]]>
<![CDATA[Heat Wave Expected, Air Quality Concerns Arise]]> Tue, 28 Jul 2015 22:55:58 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Lighthouse+Point+splashpad.jpg

Connecticut is on target for our first heat wave of the summer and state officials are warning of the possibility of poor air quality.

Temperatures climbed to 93 degrees at Bradley Airport on Tuesday, and the heat will linger into Wednesday, Thursday and possibly through the weekend as well.

Chief Meteorologist Brad Field said Meriden recorded the highest temperatures in the state Tuesday, at 94 degrees. Wednesday will likely be about 2 degrees hotter.

Several towns and cities are opening cooling centers in anticipation of what could be our first heat wave of 2015.

Ozone pollution is expected in southern sections of Fairfield and New Haven counties on Tuesday, and all of Fairfield, New Haven, Middlesex and New London Counties on Wednesday.

The state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is warning of unhealthy air quality that could make breathing difficult for "sensitive groups," including elderly residents and children and adults with respiratory illnesses. Affected individuals could also experience coughing and throat irritation.

State officials recommend taking the following measures when air pollution levels are high:

  • Conserving electricity by setting air conditioners to 78 degrees
  • "Wait 'til 8" to use energy intensive appliances like washing machines, dryers and dishwashers
  • Driving less by carpooling or using public transit
  • Telecommute if possible
  • Refuel your vehicle after dusk and never idle a vehicle unnecessarily.

"Forecasters are predicting the hottest weather of the summer yet, so everyone should take simple precautions when high temperatures combined with poor air quality is expected," DEEP Commissioner Rob Klee said in a statement Tuesday. "If you are outside at work or at play, be sure to drink plenty of water and get to an air conditioned room if you need to cool down and catch your breath."

If you are out enjoying the summer weather, send photos to us at shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Scattered Storms Ahead of Possible Heat Wave]]> Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:32:58 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/72615nightsweeping_radar_live_ct.jpg

Scattered thunderstorms and showers forecasted into the evening Sunday will be followed by a spike in temperature and a possible heat wave this week.

Showers and thunderstorms are possible up to about 11 p.m. Any storms aren't expected to be severe, but they could pack a punch with heavy rain and lightning.

There are better storm chances in the northern part of the state with chances of isolated showers overnight into Monday and possibly early Tuesday morning. Most of Tuesday and Wednesday will be dry. Tuesday to Thursday could bring a possible heat wave with temperatures possibly reaching 95. High humidity is expected this week.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Scattered Thunderstorms Possible Sunday]]> Sat, 25 Jul 2015 21:14:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/web+weather+update1.jpg

After a comfortable and sunny day on Saturday, there could be some showers in the evening.

It will likely be mid-60s overnight and then scattered storms and showers arepossible morning to evening on Sunday.

Any storms are not expected to be severe.

The warmer air will then start to take over for another hot week, with possible temperatures in the 90s.

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<![CDATA[Your Weekend Beach Forecast]]> Fri, 24 Jul 2015 19:59:09 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/219*120/lifeguard_tower_beach_gener.jpg

A ridge of high pressure over the Virginias will provide mainly dry weather on Saturday, though a weak backdoor cold front could bring a light shower to eastern areas of New England in the morning. All things considered, Saturday is the pick of the weekend.

Showers and thunderstorms will roll through New England early Sunday morning in association with a warm front, and some of them could be strong despite the time of day. Some breaks of midday sunshine will help fuel more showers and thunderstorms Sunday afternoon and evening as a cold front approaches.

Long Island Sound

  • Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs: Lower-80s.
  • Sunday: Morning showers and thunderstorms. A few breaks of sun possible midday before more showers and thunderstorms. Highs: Lower-80s.

Newport

  • Saturday: An even split between sun and clouds. Highs: Middle-70s.
  • Sunday: Showers and thunderstorms in the morning. While some sun is possible, the chance for more showers and thunderstorms exists all day long. Highs: Upper-70s.

Cape Cod

  • Saturday: Isolated light shower possible in the morning, then partly cloudy. Highs: Lower-70s.
  • Sunday: Morning showers and thunderstorms. A few breaks of sun possible midday before more showers and thunderstorms. Highs: Middle-70s.

Jersey Shore

  • Saturday: A mix of sun and clouds. Highs: Lower-80s.
  • Sunday: Mostly sunny and dry in the morning, unlike other areas in the northeast. Showers and storms do move in during the afternoon and evening, though. Highs: Lower-80s.

Coastal Maine

  • Saturday: A light shower possible early, then partly cloudy. Highs: Lower-80s.
  • Sunday: Showers and thunderstorms in the morning. While some sun is possible, the chance for more showers and thunderstorms exists all day long. Highs: Lower-80s.

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<![CDATA[Downpours, Storms Move Through]]> Fri, 24 Jul 2015 18:21:01 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/putnam+storm+kayla+frates.jpg

Downpours and scattered thunderstorms are moving through parts of the state.

A storm cell affecting the area of Windham and Mansfield could bring heavy rain, thunder and lightning as it moves southeast across Connecticut.

More intense storms over the Rhode Island border grazed part of Putnam earlier, and another batch of rain and lightning is expected to move into Litchfield County from eastern New York.

Scattered showers and storms continue through about 8 p.m. but will wind down after sunset, according to First Alert Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan.

The severe threat is low, but some storms could get feisty with small hail and gusty winds, especially in eastern Connecticut.

An upper-level low continues to spin over eastern Canada and that means there is a cold pool of air aloft. With the heating of the day, instability grows in the atmosphere and thus pop-up showers and storms are the result.

Tomorrow is the pick of the weekend, with a mix of sun and clouds, and temperatures will be in the lower- and middle-80s.

There will be a few light showers in eastern New England and one could reach the Connecticut/Rhode Island border. That would be the exception and not the rule.

It will be a decent beach day tomorrow with high tide occurring between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. in the evening. Water temperatures in Long Island Sound are now in the middle-70s!

Sunday is a different story.

A warm front will lift through the region in the early morning hours. These setups this time of year always need close monitoring because severe weather can happen even with the limited sunshine.

At the very least, showers and storms are expected on Sunday morning. It will be humid and breaks of sunshine will gradually develop as the warm front moves to the north.

The chance of showers and thunderstorms continues on Sunday afternoon as the cold front component of the system approaches from New York. Again, the storms could be strong.

Temperatures will be in the lower-80s.

Mixed signals exist for Monday. Right now, it doesn’t appear to be a great day. The cold front will get hung up somewhere close to Connecticut and produce more showers and storms. As a result, the humidity sticks around with temperatures in the middle-80s.

By Tuesday, the weather finally clears out and a surge of heat arrives.

Temperatures on Tuesday will surge to near 90 degrees. Even coastal areas will bask in the warmth with high temperature readings in the upper-80s.

Wednesday and Thursday both feature an abundance of sunshine and it will be hot. The hottest weather so far this year! High temperatures will be in the lower- and middle-90s in inland areas.

It looks probable that the year’s first heat wave will occur next week.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 



Photo Credit: Kayla Frates
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Satellite Takes Picture of Earth 1 Million Miles Away]]> Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:13:08 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/DSCOVR+earth+graphic.jpg

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association’s newest satellite has reached orbit and it serves a purpose different from the typical weather satellite.

Launched back in February, the Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, will be used primarily for solar wind measurements. The satellite will also send back pictures of earth on a frequent basis.

Satellite pictures shown in First Alert weather forecasts are taken by different satellites that are part of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system, known simply as GOES. These satellites orbit the earth 22,500 miles above the ground and provide resolution up to one kilometer.

Unlike the GOES weather satellites, DSCOVR is much farther away. It sits a whopping one million miles away from the surface of the earth at Lagrangian point one, also called L1.

Lagrangian point one is where the gravitational pull of the sun and earth balances with the centripetal force, thereby allowing the satellite in L1 orbit to remain between the sun and earth at all times.

NOAA’s space weather alerts and forecasts will benefit from having instrumentation at Lagrangian point one because it’s an ideal spot to track the solar wind.

So, how does the solar wind impact people? It’s the only way to provide 15 to 60 minutes of warning before a geomagnetic storm.
In this day and age when everybody and everything relies on technology, notification of an impending geomagnetic storm is crucial. These storms can take out major public infrastructure systems, including power grids, communications equipment and GPS.

While it would be an inconvenience to lose GPS on a family trip, national security and economic stability would also be at risk should a geomagnetic storm take out power grids and GPS.

In addition to taking solar wind observations, the satellite also carries other neat tools. NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) is used to take color pictures of the earth. Since the satellite is always between the sun and earth, the pictures will always be of the side of the planet in daylight.

The very first picture taken by EPIC was back on July 6, 2015.

By this September, images of earth from one million miles away will be publicly available in near real time. Photos will be published on a NASA webpage 12 to 36 hours after they are taken.

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<![CDATA[Pop-Up Shower Possible Friday]]> Thu, 23 Jul 2015 23:29:57 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/July+23+custom+map+weather+story.jpg

Partly cloudy skies are anticipated Friday with a pop-up shower in the afternoon. Northern and eastern areas of Connecticut stand the best chance of seeing a five-minute shower.

Saturday will be the pick of the weekend, with a mix of sun and clouds. It would make a great beach day with temperatures in the lower-and-middle 80s.

Showers are likely on Sunday as a cold front approaches. The front itself will die out before reaching New England, but the weather will still be unsettled with temperatures in the 80s.

Sunday and Monday will both be humid. Other than those two days, the forecast remains comfortable in terms of humidity.

The disturbance that brings showers on Sunday sticks around for Monday, though the chance of showers on Monday will be lower.

A good signal for sustained heat and humidity arriving in the eastern United States exists next week. As of July 23, both Connecticut climate sites have yet to experience a heat wave this year.

Tuesday appears to be the start of the surge of heat, with temperature readings potentially topping 90 degrees. It looks like Wednesday will also register 90 degrees inland, while temperatures near the water remain in the middle-80s.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Smoke From Warehouse Fire Visible on Weather Radar]]> Wed, 22 Jul 2015 23:28:46 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/NJ+Smoke+on+Radar.jpg

A large fire at a northern New Jersey warehouse Wednesday morning sent thick black smoke into the sky for hours.

According to NBC New York, the inferno in North Brunswick started just before 2 a.m. and firefighters were still battling the blaze Wednesday afternoon.

The fire was so intense, smoke billowed thousands of feet into the air. Helicopter footage showed the smoke plume drifting for miles to the southeast.

But it wasn’t just people on the ground or in helicopters that saw the smoke.

Several weather radars picked up on the smoke particles, including the one closest to the fire, which is positioned to the south in Mount Holly, New Jersey.

Atmospheric conditions must be supportive and the fire must produce enough smoke in order for weather radar to see it. It turns out that winds weren’t too strong but were blowing just enough from the northwest to push the smoke downstream.

Given that the fire occurred at night and skies were clear, an inversion was present. That means conditions were not favorable for air parcels to rise. However, given the temperature and intensity of the fire, enough of the smoke plume was able to rise into the sky.

The lowest scan on the radar out of Mount Holly goes over North Brunswick 2,500 feet above the ground. Many radar scans picked up on what was going on during the early morning hours of Wednesday.

Other weather observing equipment showed the smoke, too. Visible satellite images in the hours following sunrise revealed the longevity of the smoke plume. It traveled as far south as the waters off the Delmarva Peninsula, hundreds of miles from the source.

It’s not uncommon for weather radar to show returns that are not associated with precipitation. Insects, dust and birds are other things that show up from time to time.

Dual polarization technology allows meteorologists the analyze targets and determine if the returns are of meteorological origin or not.

In the case of smoke, the radar indicates it is looking at something very dissimilar to another target nearby. That makes sense, since particles in the smoke plume take on different shapes and sizes.

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<![CDATA[Sunny, Comfortable Weather Ahead]]> Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:37:40 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/July+22+weather+custom+map.jpg

Comfortable weather has arrived and it will stick around for a good while.

High pressure overhead means sinking air and light winds. A few puffy cumulus clouds over the higher terrain will add some variety to the otherwise blue sky.

Temperatures will peak in the lower- to middle-80s around dinnertime today.

Good radiational cooling tonight means temperatures will tumble back into the 50s and lower-60s and make for perfect sleeping weather.

Tomorrow is basically a copy of today, with mostly sunny skies and no humidity whatsoever. High temperatures are expected to be in the lower-80s.

If there is a bump in the road before this week is out, it would be Friday, when an upper-level low-pressure system over eastern Canada will send a spoke of energy through New England. That means a mix of sun and clouds and the chance of a shower or thunderstorm.

Saturday looks nice with partly cloudy skies, and it will likely be the pick of the weekend. A shower is possible later on Sunday as a cold front approaches.

Temperatures on Friday, Saturday and Sunday will be within a few degrees of 80. Meanwhile, dew points will remain in the 50s through Saturday, resulting in comfortable conditions. Sunday will be humid.

Long-range projections have a good signal for sustained heat and humidity arriving in the eastern United States next week. As of July 22, both Connecticut climate sites have yet to experience a heat wave this year.

At this point, Tuesday appears to be the start of the surge of heat, with temperatures potentially topping 90 degrees.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 

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<![CDATA[Warm Temperatures, Low Humidity Forecasted]]> Wed, 22 Jul 2015 08:09:43 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/72215+current_temperature_ct.jpg

After a stormy Tuesday night during extreme heat that has lasted the past few day, the sun is back out Wednesday along with dropping humidity and temperatures.

It will still be warm Wednesday, but not as hot as we've experienced for the last three days. With a nice breeze and low humidity, the weather is ripe for a nice beach day.

The warm temperatures and low humidity should hold through the next few days. Come Friday there is a chance of a few storms in the afternoon.

Saturday will be the pick of the weekend!



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Storms Cause Some Damage, Leave Rainbows Behind]]> Tue, 21 Jul 2015 22:00:22 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/glastonbury+storm+panoramic.png

Thunderstorms moving east across Connecticut brought heavy rain, wind and lightning to parts of the state Tuesday night, causing some damage and leaving double rainbows in their wake.

Although storms were not severe, many of us got drenched. Tree limbs and power lines also came down in certain areas, including a limb that fell on a car in New Milford and another on Fairfield Avenue in Hartford.

Eversource reported more than 4,000 power outages statewide as storms rolled through, including more than 1,100 in Hartford, where crews were called out to work on a transformer.

Storms brought welcome relief from oppressive humidity and sky-high temperatures.

Hartford and Meriden both hit 90 degrees Tuesday, but official climate observations are recorded at Sikorsky and Bradley International Airport, which peaked at 89 degrees. Neither site registered an official heat wave, which constitutes three consecutive 90-degree days.

High temperatures have led to an elevated ozone level that could create "unhealthy" breathing conditions for those with respiratory conditions. The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is forecasting unhealthy air quality.

Wednesday starts a long stretch of pleasant weather for July standards. Temperatures each day through the rest of the week will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

A big ridge of high pressure will be parked over the northeastern United States through Saturday, which means generally nice weather. There can be a stray shower on Friday.

Dew point values will also remain below 60 degrees tomorrow through Saturday, meaning it will be comfortable.

Early indications for the start of next week show unsettled conditions with lots of clouds, humidity and the chance of showers.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: Viewer Photo
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<![CDATA[Tree Crashes Through Deck of Lebanon Home Amid Summer Storm]]> Mon, 20 Jul 2015 22:33:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/lebanon+storm+damage+5.jpg

With heat and humidity bearing down on the state, powerful storms blew through eastern Connecticut on Monday, leaving damage in their wake.

Pauline Villardi came home to half her deck buried under tree limbs in Lebanon.

"It's crazy. The weather this year has been completely crazy," said Villardi. "What a mess. I could not believe the mess it had created. Half the deck is gone. The furniture on the deck was gone. It's just crashed right through it. Luckily nothing came through the house, so we felt lucky with that."

Villardi said her teenage son was home alone at the time and told her he heard tree limbs falling all around as he rushed outside to rescue their pets.

"My son called and said, 'Mom, it was over in 10 minutes,' so at that point I felt a little relief," said Villardi.

All across town, emergency crews blocked roads due to downed trees and wires. Neighbors said the storm came through fast and fierce.

"It's crazy, but that's New England. That's thunderstorms. That's pretty much expected on days like today that are hot and humid," said Lebanon resident Kristen Romans.

Many say they already know this weekend will center around picking up and repairing the damage Monday's storm left behind.

"My husband just said to us as we were sitting down to eat, 'Well, we know what we're doing this weekend: yard work!'" said Villardi.

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<![CDATA[Storms Cause Damage in Eastern Connecticut]]> Mon, 20 Jul 2015 22:24:26 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/lebanon+ct+storm+damage+july+20.jpg

Thunderstorms brought heavy rain and lightning to eastern Connecticut Monday afternoon amid the summer's first blast of sustained heat and humidity.

Weather spotters have reported storm damage at Hicksville, Gregory and Babcock Hill roads in Lebanon, along with trees and wires down on Hanover Road and Lenox Avenue in Jewett City. NBC Connecticut has also received unconfirmed reports of trees and wires down in Baltic and Griswold.

Eversource reported several power outages in the area, and Norwich Public Utilities reported an outage on Taftville Occum Road in Norwich.

A severe thunderstorm warning issued for New London County expired around 4 p.m.

The heat and humidity will stick around for tomorrow, though it won’t feel as hot with decreasing humidity levels. Temperatures will again be near 90 degrees, and a third straight day of 90-degree weather means a heat wave is in the forecast. It would be the first official heat wave of the year.

A more substantial cold front passes through around dinnertime. With it could come a shower or thunderstorm in northwest Connecticut tomorrow evening.

High temperatures are bringing about an elevated ozone level that could create "unhealthy" breathing conditions for those with respiratory conditions.

Some cities and towns are opening cooling centers in response to the extreme heat. Check to see if cooling centers are open near you.

Sunday’s high temperature reading was a toasty 92 degrees at the airport, where official climate observations are recorded.

Wednesday starts a long stretch of pleasant weather for July standards. Temperatures each day through the rest of the week will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

Dew point values will also remain below 60 degrees from Wednesday through Saturday, meaning it will be comfortable.

A ridge of high pressure will be behind the late-week delight. If the pieces fall into place just right, it might remain positioned over the region through the upcoming weekend.

Send photos of severe weather to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[Rain Showers Expected Today, Thunderstorms Possible]]> Sat, 18 Jul 2015 08:29:03 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Model+RPM4+Precip+Clouds+Floater.png

A few rain showers are expected early today followed by possible thunderstorms this afternoon.

Fairfield and New Haven counties can expect showers earlier in the day.

This afternoon, there is a risk for thunderstorms, mainly in the northern and western parts of the state.

The storms are expected around dinner time, winding down as the night goes on.

The storms come before what could be the start of a heat wave this week. Temperatures are expected to be in the 90's for the next few days accompanied by high humidity. 

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<![CDATA[Increasing Humidity Means Chance of Passing Storms This Weekend]]> Fri, 17 Jul 2015 13:41:51 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/weekend+of+july+18+forecast.jpg

High pressure in command will make for an great finish to the work week Friday, but humidity will increase again this weekend and could bring a passing storm.

We're expecting plenty of sunshine Friday, though clouds will increase this afternoon and evening. High temperatures will be in the lower-80s.

Tim McGraw takes the stage at the Xfinity Theatre in Hartford at 8 p.m. By then, temperatures will be falling quickly through the 70s and into the 60s, with a good amount of clouds in the sky.

Humidity ramps up Saturday after the passage of a warm front.

Saturday will start with low clouds, fog and perhaps a shower. We'll see some sunshine by afternoon. If enough sun sticks around, there can be a thunderstorm developing by late afternoon or evening.

The pick of the weekend is Sunday, with partly cloudy skies and temperatures in the lower-80s at the shore and near 90 degrees inland. It will be a great beach day, as Long Island Sound water temperatures are now in the lower-70s.

A disturbance in the upper-atmosphere comes through later Sunday, and with the humidity in place and the heating of the day, there may be enough lift to fire off some thunderstorms.

This situation needs to be monitored, as severe weather is a possibility, should the ingredients align. The setup also supports storms even after the sun sets, so there may be storms lingering into Sunday night and Monday morning.

A cold front comes through Monday, resulting in an abundance of clouds, showers and thunderstorms. Temperatures will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

High pressure returns in the middle part of next week, coinciding with low levels of humidity. As such, the weather will dry out Tuesday, with lots of sunshine.

Wednesday and Thursday look great, with a mix of clouds and sun as temperatures remain steady in the 80s.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Comfortable Weather to Last Through Friday]]> Thu, 16 Jul 2015 12:58:48 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/weather+july+16+2015.jpg

Downpours soaked parts of Connecticut on Wednesday, but a cold front has cleared the weather out through the end of the week.

Thursday features unlimited sunshine with no humidity whatsoever. Temperatures will be in the lower-80s for most of the state and upper-70s in the hill towns.

We'll see similar weather tomorrow morning as high pressure maintains control. We're expecting plenty of sunshine early in the day, but some clouds will move in later on. High temperatures will be in the lower-80s.

Tim McGraw takes the stage at the Xfinity Theatre at 8 p.m. By then, temperatures will be falling quickly through the 70s and into the 60s, with a good amount of clouds in the sky.

Humidity returns this weekend with the passage of a warm front.

Saturday features sun and clouds with a few showers. A rumble of thunder is possible, but the ingredients for severe weather aren’t there. Temperatures will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

The pick of the weekend looks to be Sunday, with partly cloudy skies and temperatures in the mid- and upper-80s. It would make a fabulous beach day, as Long Island Sound water temperatures are now entering the 70-degree range.

A cold front comes through early next week, either on Monday or Tuesday. The timing is key to the eventual weather but at this point, it’s uncertain.

For now, both Monday and Tuesday feature the chance for showers and thunderstorms. Temperatures will be well into the 80s, especially inland.

High pressure returns in the middle part of next week. As such, it should turn out to be pretty nice by Wednesday or Thursday.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Downpours Could Cause Flooding This Evening]]> Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:23:06 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/july+15+storm+forecast.jpg

Downpours are moving across the state this evening, along with some thunder, and parts of Connecticut could see some flooding as a result.

A flash food watch has been issued for northeastern Connecticut until 9 p.m. Wednesday.

The very latest flash flood guidance indicates it would take 2 to 3 inches of rain in three hours to cause flooding issues in Connecticut.

The greatest concern for localized flooding is in southern Connecticut, including the cities of Bridgeport, New Haven and New London. This is where the most widespread rain is expected.

The chance of severe weather is isolated, and we're not likely to see severe weather in any other part of the state, according to First Alert Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan.

The weather will improve Thursday as the cold front moves out. Not only will the humidity tick down, but we'll see sunny skies with temperatures within a few degrees of 80.

Friday continues the late-week trend of nice weather. An abundance of sun will make for a great finish to the work week, with temperatures in the lower-80s.

Tim McGraw takes the stage at the Xfinity Theatre at 8 p.m. Temperatures will be falling quickly through the 70s, with mainly clear skies.

True summer weather looks to arrive this weekend. Indications are that dew points surge into the mid-70s, which translates into an oppressive humidity reading.

Each weekend day has the chance of a thunderstorm with the soupy air in place. Temperatures will in the 80s for all, perhaps near 90 degrees for inland locations on Sunday.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.


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<![CDATA[How Connecticut Residents Perceive Hurricane Threats]]> Wed, 15 Jul 2015 09:27:54 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/199*120/sandy-ct-destruction.jpg

Researchers at Yale University in New Haven conducted a survey on how coastal Connecticut residents react to tropical storm systems, and the results are raising some eyebrows.

The investigators received responses from more than 1,000 Connecticut residents, 996 of whom experienced a hurricane or tropical storm within the past five years. Only those who experienced a storm in the past five years were included in the results.

Based on responses to the survey, Connecticut residents were broken up into five distinct groups in terms of response to a hurricane or tropical storm: first out, constrained, optimists, reluctant and diehards.

First Out

  • The "first out" group sees a great risk from hurricanes and would evacuate if one is forecast. A call from officials to evacuate isn’t necessary for this group to leave town. Interestingly enough, only about half of this sensitive group evacuated in Hurricane Sandy.

Constrained

  • Constrained residents also understand the risks associated with a tropical system, but have barriers to evacuation. Potential barriers include pets, personal disability or even lack of money. This was the smallest group, coming in with 14 percent of those included.

Optimists

  • Similar to the constrained, optimists are not well prepared to evacuate and perceive barriers to evacuation. Connecticut doesn’t often deal with land-falling hurricanes, and optimists have very low expectations that one will hit in the next 50 years.

Reluctant

  • Reluctant people would need an official evacuation order to leave. Additionally, these people tended to live farther away from the coastline. Of those included in the results, the reluctant group was largest, at 27 percent.

Diehards

  • The most resilient group of people was called diehards. These residents are least likely to evacuate and have the lowest risk perception. Diehards feel they can better protect lives and property by staying home even when the storm and its associated storm surge arrive.

Before a storm, there are numerous ways to promote evacuating. They include the governor’s office, local government, local police/fire and local media, including television and radio.

By far the most effective way to get people to evacuate is by notification from local police and fire departments. For all five groups of residents, the percentage chance they "definitely/probably would" evacuate was highest when word came from local police and fire officials.

The percentages for "definitely/probably would" evacuate were lowest for every single group if the evacuation notice were to come from television or radio sources.

Not to be understated is the need for continuing education and outreach long before a storm hits.

In the write-in section on the survey, one resident in the diehard group said, "lived here 28 years; been through a lot of storms."

The conclusion was that given the various views and attitudes towards hurricanes among the population, messages need to be tailored for different groups, clear communication of the different hazards is needed and resources for evacuation are critical.



Photo Credit: AP Photo]]>