<![CDATA[NBC Connecticut - Connecticut Weather News and Coverage]]> Copyright 2015 http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/weather/stories http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC_Connecticut.png NBC Connecticut http://www.nbcconnecticut.com en-us Tue, 28 Jul 2015 13:45:47 -0400 Tue, 28 Jul 2015 13:45:47 -0400 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Today's Forecast]]> http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/first+alert_weather+1200.jpg

FIRST ALERT FORECAST

Today: Partly sunny with a slight chance for a storm (mainly eastern CT).  Turning a bit less humid this afternoon. High 85-92.

Tonight:  Some patchy fog develops late.  Lows in the 60s to near 70.

Wednesday: Mostly sunny and hot. High: 90-95.

Thursday: Hazy, hot and humid.  Chance for an evening thunderstorm.  High: 88-93.

Friday: Sunny. High: 86-89.

Get the detailed 7-day forecast plus on hour-by-hour weather and the interactive radar by downloading the NBC Connecticut App.

Follow me on twitter:  @DARRENSWEENEY



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[Download the NBC Connecticut Weather App]]> Wed, 26 Nov 2014 07:58:58 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/NBCCTWEATHERAPP043013.jpg

 

The most accurate weather information in Connecticut is now available whenever and wherever you want it.

The NBC Connecticut weather app is available for download for iPhone, iPad and Android and it's free!

All you have to do is search NBC Connecticut or Connecticut weather in the App Store or in Google Play.

You can keep NBC Connecticut's powerful radar at your fingertips and even zoom in and out on your neighborhood.

Select to receive push notifications and you'll know when severe weather is moving your way.

Plus, the NBC Connecticut weather app provides hourly, daily and 10-day forecasts. You can even pinpoint your location via GPS for precise conditions near you.

Download and rate the NBC Connecticut Weather app today!

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<![CDATA[Scattered Storms Ahead of Possible Heat Wave]]> Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:32:58 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/72615nightsweeping_radar_live_ct.jpg

Scattered thunderstorms and showers forecasted into the evening Sunday will be followed by a spike in temperature and a possible heat wave this week.

Showers and thunderstorms are possible up to about 11 p.m. Any storms aren't expected to be severe, but they could pack a punch with heavy rain and lightning.

There are better storm chances in the northern part of the state with chances of isolated showers overnight into Monday and possibly early Tuesday morning. Most of Tuesday and Wednesday will be dry. Tuesday to Thursday could bring a possible heat wave with temperatures possibly reaching 95. High humidity is expected this week.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Scattered Thunderstorms Possible Sunday]]> Sat, 25 Jul 2015 21:14:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/web+weather+update1.jpg

After a comfortable and sunny day on Saturday, there could be some showers in the evening.

It will likely be mid-60s overnight and then scattered storms and showers arepossible morning to evening on Sunday.

Any storms are not expected to be severe.

The warmer air will then start to take over for another hot week, with possible temperatures in the 90s.

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<![CDATA[Your Weekend Beach Forecast]]> Fri, 24 Jul 2015 19:59:09 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/219*120/lifeguard_tower_beach_gener.jpg

A ridge of high pressure over the Virginias will provide mainly dry weather on Saturday, though a weak backdoor cold front could bring a light shower to eastern areas of New England in the morning. All things considered, Saturday is the pick of the weekend.

Showers and thunderstorms will roll through New England early Sunday morning in association with a warm front, and some of them could be strong despite the time of day. Some breaks of midday sunshine will help fuel more showers and thunderstorms Sunday afternoon and evening as a cold front approaches.

Long Island Sound

  • Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs: Lower-80s.
  • Sunday: Morning showers and thunderstorms. A few breaks of sun possible midday before more showers and thunderstorms. Highs: Lower-80s.

Newport

  • Saturday: An even split between sun and clouds. Highs: Middle-70s.
  • Sunday: Showers and thunderstorms in the morning. While some sun is possible, the chance for more showers and thunderstorms exists all day long. Highs: Upper-70s.

Cape Cod

  • Saturday: Isolated light shower possible in the morning, then partly cloudy. Highs: Lower-70s.
  • Sunday: Morning showers and thunderstorms. A few breaks of sun possible midday before more showers and thunderstorms. Highs: Middle-70s.

Jersey Shore

  • Saturday: A mix of sun and clouds. Highs: Lower-80s.
  • Sunday: Mostly sunny and dry in the morning, unlike other areas in the northeast. Showers and storms do move in during the afternoon and evening, though. Highs: Lower-80s.

Coastal Maine

  • Saturday: A light shower possible early, then partly cloudy. Highs: Lower-80s.
  • Sunday: Showers and thunderstorms in the morning. While some sun is possible, the chance for more showers and thunderstorms exists all day long. Highs: Lower-80s.

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<![CDATA[Downpours, Storms Move Through]]> Fri, 24 Jul 2015 18:21:01 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/putnam+storm+kayla+frates.jpg

Downpours and scattered thunderstorms are moving through parts of the state.

A storm cell affecting the area of Windham and Mansfield could bring heavy rain, thunder and lightning as it moves southeast across Connecticut.

More intense storms over the Rhode Island border grazed part of Putnam earlier, and another batch of rain and lightning is expected to move into Litchfield County from eastern New York.

Scattered showers and storms continue through about 8 p.m. but will wind down after sunset, according to First Alert Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan.

The severe threat is low, but some storms could get feisty with small hail and gusty winds, especially in eastern Connecticut.

An upper-level low continues to spin over eastern Canada and that means there is a cold pool of air aloft. With the heating of the day, instability grows in the atmosphere and thus pop-up showers and storms are the result.

Tomorrow is the pick of the weekend, with a mix of sun and clouds, and temperatures will be in the lower- and middle-80s.

There will be a few light showers in eastern New England and one could reach the Connecticut/Rhode Island border. That would be the exception and not the rule.

It will be a decent beach day tomorrow with high tide occurring between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. in the evening. Water temperatures in Long Island Sound are now in the middle-70s!

Sunday is a different story.

A warm front will lift through the region in the early morning hours. These setups this time of year always need close monitoring because severe weather can happen even with the limited sunshine.

At the very least, showers and storms are expected on Sunday morning. It will be humid and breaks of sunshine will gradually develop as the warm front moves to the north.

The chance of showers and thunderstorms continues on Sunday afternoon as the cold front component of the system approaches from New York. Again, the storms could be strong.

Temperatures will be in the lower-80s.

Mixed signals exist for Monday. Right now, it doesn’t appear to be a great day. The cold front will get hung up somewhere close to Connecticut and produce more showers and storms. As a result, the humidity sticks around with temperatures in the middle-80s.

By Tuesday, the weather finally clears out and a surge of heat arrives.

Temperatures on Tuesday will surge to near 90 degrees. Even coastal areas will bask in the warmth with high temperature readings in the upper-80s.

Wednesday and Thursday both feature an abundance of sunshine and it will be hot. The hottest weather so far this year! High temperatures will be in the lower- and middle-90s in inland areas.

It looks probable that the year’s first heat wave will occur next week.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 



Photo Credit: Kayla Frates
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Satellite Takes Picture of Earth 1 Million Miles Away]]> Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:13:08 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/DSCOVR+earth+graphic.jpg

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association’s newest satellite has reached orbit and it serves a purpose different from the typical weather satellite.

Launched back in February, the Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, will be used primarily for solar wind measurements. The satellite will also send back pictures of earth on a frequent basis.

Satellite pictures shown in First Alert weather forecasts are taken by different satellites that are part of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system, known simply as GOES. These satellites orbit the earth 22,500 miles above the ground and provide resolution up to one kilometer.

Unlike the GOES weather satellites, DSCOVR is much farther away. It sits a whopping one million miles away from the surface of the earth at Lagrangian point one, also called L1.

Lagrangian point one is where the gravitational pull of the sun and earth balances with the centripetal force, thereby allowing the satellite in L1 orbit to remain between the sun and earth at all times.

NOAA’s space weather alerts and forecasts will benefit from having instrumentation at Lagrangian point one because it’s an ideal spot to track the solar wind.

So, how does the solar wind impact people? It’s the only way to provide 15 to 60 minutes of warning before a geomagnetic storm.
In this day and age when everybody and everything relies on technology, notification of an impending geomagnetic storm is crucial. These storms can take out major public infrastructure systems, including power grids, communications equipment and GPS.

While it would be an inconvenience to lose GPS on a family trip, national security and economic stability would also be at risk should a geomagnetic storm take out power grids and GPS.

In addition to taking solar wind observations, the satellite also carries other neat tools. NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) is used to take color pictures of the earth. Since the satellite is always between the sun and earth, the pictures will always be of the side of the planet in daylight.

The very first picture taken by EPIC was back on July 6, 2015.

By this September, images of earth from one million miles away will be publicly available in near real time. Photos will be published on a NASA webpage 12 to 36 hours after they are taken.

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<![CDATA[Pop-Up Shower Possible Friday]]> Thu, 23 Jul 2015 23:29:57 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/July+23+custom+map+weather+story.jpg

Partly cloudy skies are anticipated Friday with a pop-up shower in the afternoon. Northern and eastern areas of Connecticut stand the best chance of seeing a five-minute shower.

Saturday will be the pick of the weekend, with a mix of sun and clouds. It would make a great beach day with temperatures in the lower-and-middle 80s.

Showers are likely on Sunday as a cold front approaches. The front itself will die out before reaching New England, but the weather will still be unsettled with temperatures in the 80s.

Sunday and Monday will both be humid. Other than those two days, the forecast remains comfortable in terms of humidity.

The disturbance that brings showers on Sunday sticks around for Monday, though the chance of showers on Monday will be lower.

A good signal for sustained heat and humidity arriving in the eastern United States exists next week. As of July 23, both Connecticut climate sites have yet to experience a heat wave this year.

Tuesday appears to be the start of the surge of heat, with temperature readings potentially topping 90 degrees. It looks like Wednesday will also register 90 degrees inland, while temperatures near the water remain in the middle-80s.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Smoke From Warehouse Fire Visible on Weather Radar]]> Wed, 22 Jul 2015 23:28:46 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/NJ+Smoke+on+Radar.jpg

A large fire at a northern New Jersey warehouse Wednesday morning sent thick black smoke into the sky for hours.

According to NBC New York, the inferno in North Brunswick started just before 2 a.m. and firefighters were still battling the blaze Wednesday afternoon.

The fire was so intense, smoke billowed thousands of feet into the air. Helicopter footage showed the smoke plume drifting for miles to the southeast.

But it wasn’t just people on the ground or in helicopters that saw the smoke.

Several weather radars picked up on the smoke particles, including the one closest to the fire, which is positioned to the south in Mount Holly, New Jersey.

Atmospheric conditions must be supportive and the fire must produce enough smoke in order for weather radar to see it. It turns out that winds weren’t too strong but were blowing just enough from the northwest to push the smoke downstream.

Given that the fire occurred at night and skies were clear, an inversion was present. That means conditions were not favorable for air parcels to rise. However, given the temperature and intensity of the fire, enough of the smoke plume was able to rise into the sky.

The lowest scan on the radar out of Mount Holly goes over North Brunswick 2,500 feet above the ground. Many radar scans picked up on what was going on during the early morning hours of Wednesday.

Other weather observing equipment showed the smoke, too. Visible satellite images in the hours following sunrise revealed the longevity of the smoke plume. It traveled as far south as the waters off the Delmarva Peninsula, hundreds of miles from the source.

It’s not uncommon for weather radar to show returns that are not associated with precipitation. Insects, dust and birds are other things that show up from time to time.

Dual polarization technology allows meteorologists the analyze targets and determine if the returns are of meteorological origin or not.

In the case of smoke, the radar indicates it is looking at something very dissimilar to another target nearby. That makes sense, since particles in the smoke plume take on different shapes and sizes.

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<![CDATA[Sunny, Comfortable Weather Ahead]]> Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:37:40 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/July+22+weather+custom+map.jpg

Comfortable weather has arrived and it will stick around for a good while.

High pressure overhead means sinking air and light winds. A few puffy cumulus clouds over the higher terrain will add some variety to the otherwise blue sky.

Temperatures will peak in the lower- to middle-80s around dinnertime today.

Good radiational cooling tonight means temperatures will tumble back into the 50s and lower-60s and make for perfect sleeping weather.

Tomorrow is basically a copy of today, with mostly sunny skies and no humidity whatsoever. High temperatures are expected to be in the lower-80s.

If there is a bump in the road before this week is out, it would be Friday, when an upper-level low-pressure system over eastern Canada will send a spoke of energy through New England. That means a mix of sun and clouds and the chance of a shower or thunderstorm.

Saturday looks nice with partly cloudy skies, and it will likely be the pick of the weekend. A shower is possible later on Sunday as a cold front approaches.

Temperatures on Friday, Saturday and Sunday will be within a few degrees of 80. Meanwhile, dew points will remain in the 50s through Saturday, resulting in comfortable conditions. Sunday will be humid.

Long-range projections have a good signal for sustained heat and humidity arriving in the eastern United States next week. As of July 22, both Connecticut climate sites have yet to experience a heat wave this year.

At this point, Tuesday appears to be the start of the surge of heat, with temperatures potentially topping 90 degrees.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 

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<![CDATA[Warm Temperatures, Low Humidity Forecasted]]> Wed, 22 Jul 2015 08:09:43 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/72215+current_temperature_ct.jpg

After a stormy Tuesday night during extreme heat that has lasted the past few day, the sun is back out Wednesday along with dropping humidity and temperatures.

It will still be warm Wednesday, but not as hot as we've experienced for the last three days. With a nice breeze and low humidity, the weather is ripe for a nice beach day.

The warm temperatures and low humidity should hold through the next few days. Come Friday there is a chance of a few storms in the afternoon.

Saturday will be the pick of the weekend!



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Storms Cause Some Damage, Leave Rainbows Behind]]> Tue, 21 Jul 2015 22:00:22 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/glastonbury+storm+panoramic.png

Thunderstorms moving east across Connecticut brought heavy rain, wind and lightning to parts of the state Tuesday night, causing some damage and leaving double rainbows in their wake.

Although storms were not severe, many of us got drenched. Tree limbs and power lines also came down in certain areas, including a limb that fell on a car in New Milford and another on Fairfield Avenue in Hartford.

Eversource reported more than 4,000 power outages statewide as storms rolled through, including more than 1,100 in Hartford, where crews were called out to work on a transformer.

Storms brought welcome relief from oppressive humidity and sky-high temperatures.

Hartford and Meriden both hit 90 degrees Tuesday, but official climate observations are recorded at Sikorsky and Bradley International Airport, which peaked at 89 degrees. Neither site registered an official heat wave, which constitutes three consecutive 90-degree days.

High temperatures have led to an elevated ozone level that could create "unhealthy" breathing conditions for those with respiratory conditions. The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is forecasting unhealthy air quality.

Wednesday starts a long stretch of pleasant weather for July standards. Temperatures each day through the rest of the week will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

A big ridge of high pressure will be parked over the northeastern United States through Saturday, which means generally nice weather. There can be a stray shower on Friday.

Dew point values will also remain below 60 degrees tomorrow through Saturday, meaning it will be comfortable.

Early indications for the start of next week show unsettled conditions with lots of clouds, humidity and the chance of showers.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: Viewer Photo
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Tree Crashes Through Deck of Lebanon Home Amid Summer Storm]]> Mon, 20 Jul 2015 22:33:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/lebanon+storm+damage+5.jpg

With heat and humidity bearing down on the state, powerful storms blew through eastern Connecticut on Monday, leaving damage in their wake.

Pauline Villardi came home to half her deck buried under tree limbs in Lebanon.

"It's crazy. The weather this year has been completely crazy," said Villardi. "What a mess. I could not believe the mess it had created. Half the deck is gone. The furniture on the deck was gone. It's just crashed right through it. Luckily nothing came through the house, so we felt lucky with that."

Villardi said her teenage son was home alone at the time and told her he heard tree limbs falling all around as he rushed outside to rescue their pets.

"My son called and said, 'Mom, it was over in 10 minutes,' so at that point I felt a little relief," said Villardi.

All across town, emergency crews blocked roads due to downed trees and wires. Neighbors said the storm came through fast and fierce.

"It's crazy, but that's New England. That's thunderstorms. That's pretty much expected on days like today that are hot and humid," said Lebanon resident Kristen Romans.

Many say they already know this weekend will center around picking up and repairing the damage Monday's storm left behind.

"My husband just said to us as we were sitting down to eat, 'Well, we know what we're doing this weekend: yard work!'" said Villardi.

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<![CDATA[Storms Cause Damage in Eastern Connecticut]]> Mon, 20 Jul 2015 22:24:26 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/lebanon+ct+storm+damage+july+20.jpg

Thunderstorms brought heavy rain and lightning to eastern Connecticut Monday afternoon amid the summer's first blast of sustained heat and humidity.

Weather spotters have reported storm damage at Hicksville, Gregory and Babcock Hill roads in Lebanon, along with trees and wires down on Hanover Road and Lenox Avenue in Jewett City. NBC Connecticut has also received unconfirmed reports of trees and wires down in Baltic and Griswold.

Eversource reported several power outages in the area, and Norwich Public Utilities reported an outage on Taftville Occum Road in Norwich.

A severe thunderstorm warning issued for New London County expired around 4 p.m.

The heat and humidity will stick around for tomorrow, though it won’t feel as hot with decreasing humidity levels. Temperatures will again be near 90 degrees, and a third straight day of 90-degree weather means a heat wave is in the forecast. It would be the first official heat wave of the year.

A more substantial cold front passes through around dinnertime. With it could come a shower or thunderstorm in northwest Connecticut tomorrow evening.

High temperatures are bringing about an elevated ozone level that could create "unhealthy" breathing conditions for those with respiratory conditions.

Some cities and towns are opening cooling centers in response to the extreme heat. Check to see if cooling centers are open near you.

Sunday’s high temperature reading was a toasty 92 degrees at the airport, where official climate observations are recorded.

Wednesday starts a long stretch of pleasant weather for July standards. Temperatures each day through the rest of the week will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

Dew point values will also remain below 60 degrees from Wednesday through Saturday, meaning it will be comfortable.

A ridge of high pressure will be behind the late-week delight. If the pieces fall into place just right, it might remain positioned over the region through the upcoming weekend.

Send photos of severe weather to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Cooling Centers Open During Another Hot Week]]> Tue, 28 Jul 2015 13:10:22 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/sunshine3.jpg

We're in for another stretch of hot weather, and some municipalities are opening cooling centers as temperatures climb.

Bloomfield (Tuesday, July 28 to Friday, July 31)

  • Bloomfield Municipal Pool, 860-761-3597, open from 1 to 4 p.m. for recreational swimming and 6 to 8 p.m. for family swims.
  • The Alvin & Beatrice Wood Human Services Center, 330 Park Avenue, 860-243-8361, open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Prosser Library, 1 Tunxis Avenue, 860-243-9721, open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday to Thursday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday.
  • McMahon Wintonbury Library, 1015 Blue Hills Avenue, 860-242-0041, open from 1 to 8 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday and 1 to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Friday.

Note: The town of Bloomfield will make water available to residents, but asks people to bring their own food to the cooling centers.

Hartford (Tuesday, July 28 through Sunday, Aug. 2)

  • North End Senior Center, 80 Coventry Street, open from 8:30 am to 5 p.m.
  • South End Wellness Center, 830 Maple Avenue, open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Parkville Senior Center, 11 New Park Avenue, open from 8:30 a.m.to 3:30 p.m.
  • Hispanic Health Council, 175 Main Street, 8:30 a.ml, to 4:30 p.m.
  • Hispanic Senior Center, 45 Wadsworth Street, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Hartford Public Library's branches are also other options for places to cool off:

  • Hartford Downtown Public Library, 500 Main Street,  open from 10 a.m to 8 p.m.
  • Albany Library Branch, 1250 Albany Avenue, open from 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
  • Barbour Branch, 281 Barbour Street, open from 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
  • Camp Field Branch, 30 Campfield Avenue, open from 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
  • Mark Twain Branch, 55 Forest Street, open from 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
  • Park Branch, 744 Park Street, open from 12:30 p.m to 5:30 p.m.
  • SANDS/Ropkins, 1750 Main Street, 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
  • Goodwin, 460 New Britain Avenue, 12:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m .
  • Blue Hills Branch, 649 Blue Hills Avenue, 12:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

New Haven

  • Senior centers
  • Libraries

Simsbury (Tuesday, July 28 through Sunday, Aug. 2)

  • Simsbury Public Library, 725 Hopmeadown Street (lower-level entrance), open from 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.
  • Eno Memorial Hall (senior center), 754 Hopmeadow Street, open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.
  • More information about staying safe in extreme heat is available by calling the town's Social Services Department at 860-658-3283.

Stamford (Tuesday July 28 through Friday, July 31)

  • Stamford Government Center, 888 Washington Blvd, open from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Stamford Fire Department Headquarters, 629 Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Long Ridge Fire Company, 366 Old Long Ridge Road, open from 8:30 am to 6 p.m.

Officials from Stamford have warned residents to keep an eye out for these heat stroke signs and symptoms:

  • If someone has a body temperature that's 105 degrees or more
  • Hot and dry skin with red spots
  • Confusion mentally
  • Someone has lost consciousness
  • Someone is convulsing

People at the greatest risk of heat-related illnesses, according to Stamford officials, include:

  • Infants
  • Young children
  • Mentally ill individuals
  • People who are physically ill
  • Anyone with heart disease or high blood pressure

New Haven is also extending hours at Lighthouse Point Park beach and city pools in Career, Hillhouse, Martinez and Wilbur Cross pools so people can cool off. The extended hours will hold on any days the weather breaks 90 degrees.

  • Beach: Lifeguards will be on duty until 7 p.m.
  • Pool: Open until 8 p.m.
  • City splashpads: programmed to shut off later, but they will all close at Sundown except the splashpad located at Lighthouse Point Park, which closes at 7 p.m.

You should call 911 or go to a hospital emergency room if you are experiencing those symptoms. Also, make sure to get the person out of the sun and use water to help the individual cool off.

Call 211 or check 211ct.org for information on other shelters and alternative resources to beat the heat in Connecticut towns.

Officials in various towns are advising residents to take the following precautions in the extreme heat:

  • Stay hydrated throughout the day and avoid dehydrating drinks containing alcohol or caffeine.
  • Stay inside if you can or minimize your exposure to the sun. If you do venture outside, put sunblock with an SPF of 30 or higher on.
  • Wear clothing that's lightweight or loose-fitting.
  • Stay in an air-conditioned place like a library, mall or movie theater during the hottest peaks of the day.
  • While electric fans may make you more comfortable when it's hot out, they will not ward off possible heat-related illnesses in high 90-degree weather.
  • Don't leave children, senior citizens or pets in a vehicle that is closed or leave pets outside for a long duration.
  • Check on elderly family members and neighbors.
  • Have your family doctor's phone number posted next to your phone at home or easily accessible in your cell phone.
  • Limit outdoor activity to early morning and evening hours.
  • Cut down on physical activity.
  • Drink two to four glasses of cold, non-alchoholic fluids an hour if you choose to exercise. Sports beverages replace salt and minerals you lose when you sweat, so if you're on a low-salt diet, check with your doctor before having a sports drink.
  • Rest often in the shade.
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat to protect yourself from the son and stay cool, wear sunglasses and put sunscreen on that's SPF or highers.
  • Eat well-balanced and regular light meals.
  • Stay on your home's lowest floor.

Bridgeport's emergency management website and downloadable extreme heat guide have more information on how to stay cool and beat the heat.

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<![CDATA[Rain Showers Expected Today, Thunderstorms Possible]]> Sat, 18 Jul 2015 08:29:03 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Model+RPM4+Precip+Clouds+Floater.png

A few rain showers are expected early today followed by possible thunderstorms this afternoon.

Fairfield and New Haven counties can expect showers earlier in the day.

This afternoon, there is a risk for thunderstorms, mainly in the northern and western parts of the state.

The storms are expected around dinner time, winding down as the night goes on.

The storms come before what could be the start of a heat wave this week. Temperatures are expected to be in the 90's for the next few days accompanied by high humidity. 

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<![CDATA[Increasing Humidity Means Chance of Passing Storms This Weekend]]> Fri, 17 Jul 2015 13:41:51 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/weekend+of+july+18+forecast.jpg

High pressure in command will make for an great finish to the work week Friday, but humidity will increase again this weekend and could bring a passing storm.

We're expecting plenty of sunshine Friday, though clouds will increase this afternoon and evening. High temperatures will be in the lower-80s.

Tim McGraw takes the stage at the Xfinity Theatre in Hartford at 8 p.m. By then, temperatures will be falling quickly through the 70s and into the 60s, with a good amount of clouds in the sky.

Humidity ramps up Saturday after the passage of a warm front.

Saturday will start with low clouds, fog and perhaps a shower. We'll see some sunshine by afternoon. If enough sun sticks around, there can be a thunderstorm developing by late afternoon or evening.

The pick of the weekend is Sunday, with partly cloudy skies and temperatures in the lower-80s at the shore and near 90 degrees inland. It will be a great beach day, as Long Island Sound water temperatures are now in the lower-70s.

A disturbance in the upper-atmosphere comes through later Sunday, and with the humidity in place and the heating of the day, there may be enough lift to fire off some thunderstorms.

This situation needs to be monitored, as severe weather is a possibility, should the ingredients align. The setup also supports storms even after the sun sets, so there may be storms lingering into Sunday night and Monday morning.

A cold front comes through Monday, resulting in an abundance of clouds, showers and thunderstorms. Temperatures will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

High pressure returns in the middle part of next week, coinciding with low levels of humidity. As such, the weather will dry out Tuesday, with lots of sunshine.

Wednesday and Thursday look great, with a mix of clouds and sun as temperatures remain steady in the 80s.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Comfortable Weather to Last Through Friday]]> Thu, 16 Jul 2015 12:58:48 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/weather+july+16+2015.jpg

Downpours soaked parts of Connecticut on Wednesday, but a cold front has cleared the weather out through the end of the week.

Thursday features unlimited sunshine with no humidity whatsoever. Temperatures will be in the lower-80s for most of the state and upper-70s in the hill towns.

We'll see similar weather tomorrow morning as high pressure maintains control. We're expecting plenty of sunshine early in the day, but some clouds will move in later on. High temperatures will be in the lower-80s.

Tim McGraw takes the stage at the Xfinity Theatre at 8 p.m. By then, temperatures will be falling quickly through the 70s and into the 60s, with a good amount of clouds in the sky.

Humidity returns this weekend with the passage of a warm front.

Saturday features sun and clouds with a few showers. A rumble of thunder is possible, but the ingredients for severe weather aren’t there. Temperatures will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

The pick of the weekend looks to be Sunday, with partly cloudy skies and temperatures in the mid- and upper-80s. It would make a fabulous beach day, as Long Island Sound water temperatures are now entering the 70-degree range.

A cold front comes through early next week, either on Monday or Tuesday. The timing is key to the eventual weather but at this point, it’s uncertain.

For now, both Monday and Tuesday feature the chance for showers and thunderstorms. Temperatures will be well into the 80s, especially inland.

High pressure returns in the middle part of next week. As such, it should turn out to be pretty nice by Wednesday or Thursday.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Downpours Could Cause Flooding This Evening]]> Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:23:06 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/july+15+storm+forecast.jpg

Downpours are moving across the state this evening, along with some thunder, and parts of Connecticut could see some flooding as a result.

A flash food watch has been issued for northeastern Connecticut until 9 p.m. Wednesday.

The very latest flash flood guidance indicates it would take 2 to 3 inches of rain in three hours to cause flooding issues in Connecticut.

The greatest concern for localized flooding is in southern Connecticut, including the cities of Bridgeport, New Haven and New London. This is where the most widespread rain is expected.

The chance of severe weather is isolated, and we're not likely to see severe weather in any other part of the state, according to First Alert Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan.

The weather will improve Thursday as the cold front moves out. Not only will the humidity tick down, but we'll see sunny skies with temperatures within a few degrees of 80.

Friday continues the late-week trend of nice weather. An abundance of sun will make for a great finish to the work week, with temperatures in the lower-80s.

Tim McGraw takes the stage at the Xfinity Theatre at 8 p.m. Temperatures will be falling quickly through the 70s, with mainly clear skies.

True summer weather looks to arrive this weekend. Indications are that dew points surge into the mid-70s, which translates into an oppressive humidity reading.

Each weekend day has the chance of a thunderstorm with the soupy air in place. Temperatures will in the 80s for all, perhaps near 90 degrees for inland locations on Sunday.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.


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<![CDATA[How Connecticut Residents Perceive Hurricane Threats]]> Wed, 15 Jul 2015 09:27:54 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/199*120/sandy-ct-destruction.jpg

Researchers at Yale University in New Haven conducted a survey on how coastal Connecticut residents react to tropical storm systems, and the results are raising some eyebrows.

The investigators received responses from more than 1,000 Connecticut residents, 996 of whom experienced a hurricane or tropical storm within the past five years. Only those who experienced a storm in the past five years were included in the results.

Based on responses to the survey, Connecticut residents were broken up into five distinct groups in terms of response to a hurricane or tropical storm: first out, constrained, optimists, reluctant and diehards.

First Out

  • The "first out" group sees a great risk from hurricanes and would evacuate if one is forecast. A call from officials to evacuate isn’t necessary for this group to leave town. Interestingly enough, only about half of this sensitive group evacuated in Hurricane Sandy.

Constrained

  • Constrained residents also understand the risks associated with a tropical system, but have barriers to evacuation. Potential barriers include pets, personal disability or even lack of money. This was the smallest group, coming in with 14 percent of those included.

Optimists

  • Similar to the constrained, optimists are not well prepared to evacuate and perceive barriers to evacuation. Connecticut doesn’t often deal with land-falling hurricanes, and optimists have very low expectations that one will hit in the next 50 years.

Reluctant

  • Reluctant people would need an official evacuation order to leave. Additionally, these people tended to live farther away from the coastline. Of those included in the results, the reluctant group was largest, at 27 percent.

Diehards

  • The most resilient group of people was called diehards. These residents are least likely to evacuate and have the lowest risk perception. Diehards feel they can better protect lives and property by staying home even when the storm and its associated storm surge arrive.

Before a storm, there are numerous ways to promote evacuating. They include the governor’s office, local government, local police/fire and local media, including television and radio.

By far the most effective way to get people to evacuate is by notification from local police and fire departments. For all five groups of residents, the percentage chance they "definitely/probably would" evacuate was highest when word came from local police and fire officials.

The percentages for "definitely/probably would" evacuate were lowest for every single group if the evacuation notice were to come from television or radio sources.

Not to be understated is the need for continuing education and outreach long before a storm hits.

In the write-in section on the survey, one resident in the diehard group said, "lived here 28 years; been through a lot of storms."

The conclusion was that given the various views and attitudes towards hurricanes among the population, messages need to be tailored for different groups, clear communication of the different hazards is needed and resources for evacuation are critical.



Photo Credit: AP Photo]]>
<![CDATA[Downpours Could Cause Localized Flooding]]> Tue, 14 Jul 2015 14:30:11 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/july+14+weather+story+graphic.jpg

Summertime downpours coupled with humidity continue Tuesday and Wednesday.

Scattered bursts of torrential rain are expected through the rest of the day, with more clouds than sun. Temperatures will be near 80 degrees, with very humid conditions.

A cold front comes through tomorrow as humidity levels surge to oppressive. A wave of low pressure will also form near Toms River, New Jersey. This combination will enhance the atmospheric lift and make for a localized flood threat tomorrow.

Generally speaking, it would take 3 inches of rain in three hours to cause flash flooding in Connecticut. Southern New Haven and Fairfield counties are most at risk, where it would only take an inch of rain in one hour to trigger flash flooding.

Temperatures will be in the 80s with oppressive levels of humidity.

Much improved weather arrives Thursday behind the cold front. Not only will the humidity tick down a bit, but full sunshine is expected with temperatures within a few degrees of 80.

Friday continues the late-week trend of nice weather. An abundance of sun will make for a great finish to the work week, with temperatures in the lower-80s.

Tim McGraw takes the stage at the Xfinity Theatre at 8 p.m. Temperatures will be falling quickly through the 70s with mainly clear skies!

True summer weather looks to arrive this weekend. Indications are that dew points surge into the mid-70s, which translates into an oppressive humidity reading.

Each weekend day has the chance of a thunderstorm, with the soupy air in place. Temperatures will in the 80s for all, perhaps near 90 degrees for inland locations on Sunday.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.


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<![CDATA[Rising Chance of Showers and Storms]]> Mon, 13 Jul 2015 13:04:15 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/weather+story+july+13+2015.png

Humidity will increase and so will the chance for showers and storms with a southerly flow heading into midweek.

Monday features partly cloudy skies and certainly a filtered look as a result of haze or smoke. Temperatures will be in the upper-80s inland and low 80s at the shore.

Scattered thunderstorms are expected Tuesday afternoon, with more clouds than sun. Temperatures will be near 80 degrees with very humid conditions.

A cold front comes through Wednesday as humidity levels surge to oppressive. Wednesday features the best chance of showers and thunderstorms, but the timing of the front may be early enough to preclude anything major. Temperatures will be in the 80s.

Much improved weather arrives Thursday behind the cold front. Expect a mix of sun and puffy cumulus clouds. Humidity levels will be noticeably lower, with temperatures in the 80s.

Friday continues the late-week trend of comfortable weather. An abundance of sun will make for a great finish to the work week, with temperatures in the lower- and mid-80s.

True summer weather looks to arrive this weekend. Indications are that dew points surge into the mid-70s, which translates into an oppressive humidity reading.

Each weekend day has the chance of a thunderstorm with the soupy air in place. Temperatures will be near 90 degrees inland and mid-80s at the beaches.

Hartford-Brainard hit 90 degrees this past Sunday, but official climate observations are taken at Bradley International, which peaked at 89 degrees.

That makes for a total of four 89-degree days this year, while there have only been two 90-degree days. The average number of 90-degree days through July 10 is six.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Sunny, Warm Weather This Weekend]]> Fri, 10 Jul 2015 15:04:55 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Fireworks+Hartford.jpg

An awesome weekend of weather is on deck as high pressure builds into the region.

Puffy cumulus clouds will dot the sky today with temperatures in the middle-80s and afternoon humidity levels will be comfortable with a refreshing breeze!

Tomorrow, the temperatures surge toward 90 degrees inland with lots of sun and temperatures at the shoreline will be in the middle-80s, so it will be a great beach day.

Sunday is basically a copy of Saturday, except there’s a better chance that a few locations top 90 degrees, which would be the first 90-degree day of the summer.

Since the snow melted, two days have hit 90 degrees in the Hartford area, but both were in May. On average, through July 10, inland Connecticut sees six days top out at 90 degrees or higher.

There are several concerts at the Xfinity Theatre and several fireworks displays this weekend and the weather couldn’t be more cooperative.

Next week, a dip in the jet stream results in an unsettled pattern that doesn’t look pleasant at all. The key to each day’s forecast will be timing little disturbances in the flow.

While most of Monday is dry as clouds thicken, a shower is possible late as a warm front lifts over the region. Temperatures will be in the middle-80s.

A few cold fronts will approach and pass through on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, so each day features clouds, showers and humidity, but some breaks of sun are likely.

Thunderstorms are possible in the middle part of next week, but it’s too early to peg down the specifics. Temperatures will be in the 80s.

Indications are that high pressure finally returns on Friday of next week, so after a long stretch of unsettled weather, the week might end on a high note.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Rain Moves Through State]]> Thu, 09 Jul 2015 22:23:23 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Model+HRRR+Precip+Clouds+Floater+1200.jpg

Rain is moving west to east across the state and will fall heavily at times late this evening and especially as midnight nears.

It will end before sunrise on Friday.

Flash flood watches were issued earlier for southern Connecticut but have since been canceled.

Rain totals for many locations could surpass half an inch, but more than that is certainly possible in the heaviest cells.

Flash flooding is a medium threat tonight, especially in areas that experienced heavy rain in recent days. Danbury, for example, has already seen more than three inches of rain this week.

High pressure finally builds in tomorrow and sticks around for the entire weekend, providing tons of sunshine. Humidity levels look exceptionally low, once again, for the time of year.

Friday and Saturday will both feature temperatures in the middle- and upper-80s, while some of the state will touch 90 degrees on Sunday for the first time this summer. So far this year, only two 90 degree days have occurred at Bradley International and both were in May.

Next week dips in the jet stream resulting in a very unsettled pattern that doesn’t look pleasant at all.

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday will probably have more clouds than sun and the chance for showers. Thunderstorms are also a possibility.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[More Scattered Heavy Downpours Today]]> Wed, 08 Jul 2015 14:16:24 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/78115Model+HRRR+Precip+Clouds+Floater+1200.jpg

A cold front will slowly slice across the state today and trigger more downpours and rumbles of thunder.

It was only yesterday that downpours sparked multiple flood advisories and Danbury, for example, picked up a whopping 3.2 inches of rain in a six-hour span.

The atmosphere is still loaded with moisture and winds are light in the lowest levels. This means flash flooding is a low-to-moderate concern. Any flash flooding won’t be widespread but would still cause trouble in localized spots. Temperatures will barely make it into the middle-80s.

[[273570711,C]]

Despite yesterday’s rain, it would still take 2 to 3 inches of rain in a three-hour window to cause flash flooding across the state.

Southern New Haven and Fairfield Counties are most vulnerable to flooding again today simply because it would only take two inches of rain in a three hour period there.

The cold will be south and east of Connecticut tomorrow, but most indications are that a wave of low pressure develops along the front and a sizable burst rides from west to east in the evening.

The thinking right now is that most of the steady rain will miss the state to the south; still, more clouds than sun are expected and scattered showers are in the forecast.

High pressure finally builds in for Friday and Saturday, providing tons of sunshine. Humidity levels look exceptionally low, once again, for the time of year. The end of week weather is something to get excited about!

By Sunday evening, clouds increase ahead of the next weather-maker but it should be dry during the daylight hours. Temperatures will be in the upper-80s both Saturday and Sunday.

Next week dips in the jet stream result in a very unsettled pattern that doesn’t look pleasant at all. Monday looks pretty wet with numerous showers and perhaps thunder.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[Wildfire Smoke Filtering Sun]]> Mon, 06 Jul 2015 18:32:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/218*120/NASAsatellite+CT.jpg

Notice the hazy, faded or milky appearance to the sky today? You’re not alone.

While some high clouds obscured the sun, they weren’t the only thing in play.

Many large wildfires are burning in Canada and Alaska, and that’s largely where the atmospheric flow has been coming from.

Alberta, Canada has more than two dozen fires that are each burning more than 6,000 acres according to information from the Alberta Forest Protection Division.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service reports Alaska has 28 uncontained large wildfires.

NBC Connecticut’s network of high definition sky cams captured the abnormal look to the sky Monday afternoon. You can view photographs in the gallery above.

According to Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, the air quality index is moderate, which is mainly due to fine particles.

Moving forward, clouds will dominate on Tuesday and Wednesday so any lingering smoke won’t be as noticeable in the sky.
 

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<![CDATA[Scattered Heavy Downpours, Thundershower Midweek]]> Mon, 06 Jul 2015 23:29:01 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Model+RPM12+Precip+Clouds+Floater.jpg

Hazy sunshine to start the week will fade to clouds, with extreme humidity and a chance for downpours or even a thundershower Tuesday into Wednesday.

A warm front lifts across Connecticut on Tuesday, which means an abundance of clouds. Scattered showers are likely and we could even see some thunderstorms. Temperatures will be in the 80s and humidity will be oppressive.

The atmosphere will be loaded with moisture and winds will be pretty light in the lowest levels, which means flash flooding is a concern.

Currently, it would only take 2-3 inches of rain in a three-hour window to cause flash flooding across the state. Southern New Haven and Fairfield counties are most vulnerable to flooding simply because it would only take 2 inches of rain in a three-hour period there.

Wednesday brings similar weather with oppressive humidity and lots of clouds. Showers will be most numerous in the afternoon, hours before a cold front passes through. Flash flooding will again be possible and the chance of a thunderstorm will increase as the cold front arrives.

The forecast turns murky late week due to uncertainty. Rain and thunder could linger into early Thursday.

There should be more sun later in the week, and it will certainly be more comfortable as humidity levels drop Thursday and Friday.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Fourth of July Weekend Closes With Sun]]> Sun, 05 Jul 2015 11:45:24 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/sunshine3.jpg

After scattered showers on the 4th of July, high pressure building in the region will provide an awesome finish to the holiday weekend.

Planning on heading to the beach? Sunday features an abundance of sunshine, comfortable levels of humidity and a light northwest wind. Temperatures will be in the upper-80s inland, lower-80s on the shoreline.

Temperatures soar to the 90s on Monday, marking the third time temperatures have reached that height so far this year. The humidity will still be pretty low. A mix of sunshine and puffy cumulus clouds is expected.

An increase in humidity will arrive Tuesday and Wednesday, accompanied by an abundance of clouds and scattered showers and thunderstorms. Thunderstorms are most likely on Wednesday. Temperatures will be in the lower- and mid-80s.

A cold front will come through the state at some point late Wednesday and clear things out for late week.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.


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<![CDATA[Threat of Severe Weather Has Passed]]> Wed, 01 Jul 2015 18:06:25 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Model+HRRR+iCAST+Precip+Clouds+Temp+CT.jpg

One round of thunderstorms moved through this morning and the threat of severe weather continued through this afternoon before moving out Wednesday evening.

A few towns may see showers through the early evening.

Skies clear overnight as temperatures fall into the 60s and refreshing air moves in by morning.

Thursday starts will an abundance of sun before some clouds move in and temperatures will be near 80 degrees with low levels of humidity!

High pressure builds in to close the work week on Friday and that means an abundance of sunshine. Temperatures will be near 80 degrees with exceptionally low levels of humidity.

The big ticket item in the extended forecast is obviously July Fourth.

High pressure sticks around all weekend long, making for perfect parade, fireworks and cookout weather. Impressively, the humidity remains absent! Temperatures will be in the middle-80s.

Early next appears dry at this point with temperatures rising into the upper-80s.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.


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<![CDATA[Thunderstorms Led to Crashes, Power Outages]]> Wed, 01 Jul 2015 13:15:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/7+a.m.+radar+july+1+1200.jpg

A line of storms moved hrough the state on Wednesday morning, bringing heavy rain, thunder and vivid lightning, which led to thousands of power outages and several crashes during the early morning commute.

More scattered storms and showers are possible as the day continues until temperatures cool this evening.

The lingering impact from the morning storm is power outages.

Eversource was reporting 5,275 power outages at the height of the storms. As of noon, 669 home and businesses in the Eversource grid have no power. Outages in Ridgefield affected traffic signals in town.

There are 24 United Illuminating customers without power and all are in Milford.

There is a low risk for isolated severe wind or hail this afternoon and the threat of storms will likely be diminishing early evening.

Firefighters in several towns, including East Lyme and Burlington, have been busy this morning responding to fires and they are looking into whether lightning is to blame for the one in East Lyme.

Severe thunderstorm warnings were issued for Windham, Fairfield, New London and Middlesex counties, but they have expired.

A cold front passes through Wednesday night ushering in drier air and clearing skies for Thursday.

A developing wave of low pressure over Kentucky will ride along the front, but it should get shunted south by a dome of high pressure over the Great Lakes. That means dry weather heading into the Fourth of July weekend!

Temperatures will be in the low-80s on Thursday and Friday, with more clouds and sun on Thursday and plentiful sunshine by Friday.

While it’s not a definite yet, the entire holiday weekend looks dry with temperatures in the mid-80s and little in the way of humidity.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[Many Chances for Rain This Week]]> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 12:41:03 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Model+Dew+Point+Trend+Hartford+June+29.jpg

After a wet, cloudy weekend, the start to the work week isn’t much better. An abundance of clouds today will keep temperatures in the 70s. There can be a spot sprinkle, but overall there will be more peeks of sun as the day wears on.

A dry window of weather arrives on Tuesday, with plenty of sunshine and temperatures in the 80s inland and 70s at the shore. From a humidity standpoint, it will be a comfortable day!

By Tuesday night, a warm front will move over the region and result in scattered showers and increasing humidity. Temperatures will be quite warm in the mid-60s.

Numerous showers and thunderstorms are expected throughout Wednesday, and some of the storms could be strong to severe. It all depends on how much warm air is able to sneak into the region. For now, the forecast is for temperatures in 80s inland.

Unfortunately, the threat of showers and thunderstorms doesn’t go away with the passage of the cold front.

A developing wave of low pressure over Kentucky will ride along the stalled front and help feed in more showers for Thursday.

The track of the storm will determine whether Friday features a soaking rain or just clouds and a few showers.

It will likely be humid with dew points well into the 60s.

The big ticket item in the extended forecast is obviously July Fourth. It’s too far out to etch anything into stone, but most of the holiday weekend appears dry and seasonably warm with high pressure in command.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Branford, Danbury Postpone Fireworks Again Due to Rain]]> Sun, 28 Jun 2015 12:30:56 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/230*120/fireworks-772x350.jpg

Danbury and Branford have once again canceled fireworks displays due to the weather.

Fireworks originally scheduled for Saturday in Branford and at Candlewood Town Park in Danbury were rescheduled for Sunday, but have been called off again because of the rain. Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton tweeted that there is no word on when the Candlewood fireworks will be rescheduled to and the Branford Fire Department posted on its Facebook page that Branford fireworks will be held on a later date.

CoventryFest at Patriots Park was moved from Saturday to Sunday, June 28 at 3 p.m. There will be live performances, a castle bounce and a balloon animal artist for the kids and fireworks at the end of the event. There is limiting parking at the site of the event for $10 and off-site parking is $15. More information is available on the CoventryFest website.

The East Haven 15th Anniversary Independence Day Fireworks-Beach Party was postponed to Monday due to rain and poor sea conditions.

Cosey Beach Avenue will close from Coe to 2nd avenues on Monday at 2 p.m. to make room for the food court. Any other road closures in the area will start at 6 p.m. on Monday.

Entertainment will begin on the beach at 2 p.m. and food vendors will start selling food after 4 p.m. The Sandpiper and Beach Head Restaurants will be open regular hours.

The Bronx Wanderers will start playing at 7:30 p.m. The fireworks will be at 9 p.m. on Monday.

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<![CDATA[Partial Sun Expected Monday]]> Sun, 28 Jun 2015 20:10:07 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/62815pmsweeping_radar_live_ct.jpg

After drizzling and possible showers expected into Sunday evening, Connecticut's bout of inclement weather should begin to clear on Monday.

Rain was expected to taper off Sunday evening with some partial clearing by morning with temperature lows in the 50s, according to First Alert Meteorologist Darren Sweeney.

There will be better weather on Monday, with a mix of sun and clouds. Temperatures will warm up to the mid-70s. Through Saturday and heading into Fourth of July weekend, temperatures will likely reach highs of the 80s.

The state got an inch to an inch and a half of rain overnight and Sunday morning. There were about 600 customers without power across the state earlier in the morning and a tree fell on a house in Norfolk. A problem with a utility pole in Kent caused hundreds of power outages and closed Route 341.

The Travelers Championship had delayed tee times on Sunday in Cromwell, starting two hours later at 11:30 a.m. due to the rain.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Wallingford Family Loses Home to Severe Weather]]> Thu, 25 Jun 2015 04:53:19 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/WALLINGFORD+HOME+DESTROYED.jpg

Members of one Wallingford family lost their home Tuesday night when 90-mph winds swept parts of the state, bringing down trees and power lines and causing damage that could take days to repair.

Nadir Balan and wife Jen McClure moved into their home on Grantham Road back in September. It was their dream house.

Now, that dream home is under a 50-foot-tall tree. It crashed into the house last night after a microburst stormed through Wallingford.

Balan said the home can't be salvaged. He and his wife are trying to save whatever they can.

"There wasn’t much that we could get out as far as our personal items. Essentially, both of our offices got crushed," said Balan.

The couple is one of about 3,000 customers in town left without electricity.

Several businesses have had to close because of all the power lines that went down.

Some, like Giganti’s Too, are working without power.

"The lights are off. People are coming in, are very hungry, have no food. We're just trying to do the best we can," said Grace Gelletti, who has to improvise what she feeds at her restaurant.

Officials hope power will be restored by midnight on Friday.

Town leaders aren’t sure how long cleanup will take, but they’re asking residents to be patient.

"It’s weird," said Balan, gazing at his destroyed home. "It’s only just starting to hit me… it hasn’t been a full day yet."

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<![CDATA[Soaking Rain Possible This Weekend]]> Wed, 24 Jun 2015 20:03:26 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/weather+map+june+24.png

A gorgeous Wednesday is in progress after severe weather caused extensive damage in southern portions of the state yesterday.

Sunny skies and temperatures in the 80s can be expected for the duration of today. No humidity will be present.

Tomorrow, a few more clouds will be around but it will still be a nice day with temperatures in the 80s. Shower activity should miss Connecticut, and humidity values will still be low. A passing shower is possible in the evening, but most of the day will be dry.

Friday features a mix of sun and clouds, with the chance for a shower. Temperatures will be in the 70s, so it will be cooler.

This weekend, a storm rides over the region. The question is really when, not if. At this point, Sunday appears wettest with a good amount of rain. Temperatures will be stuck in the 60s!

Come visit First Alert 1 and members of the NBC Connecticut team in the Travelers Championship Fan Zone through Sunday!

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<![CDATA[Wallingford Power Restoration Could Last Into Weekend]]> Thu, 25 Jun 2015 17:23:47 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/grantham+road+wallingford+1+1200.jpg

Power remains out for around 1,300 homes and businesses in Wallingford today after storms ravaged the area on Tuesday.

Municipal utility company Wallingford Electric said some 3000 homes were without power Wednesday. Town officials said they expect to restore power to another 200 homes by midnight Thursday into Friday that most customers should have power by the end of the day Friday.

Electricity may not be restored fully until Saturday morning, officials said. A variety of problems have contributed to the outages, so officials cannot provide a more precise estimate.

Wallingford Electric's six line crews are working to restore power with help from municipal electric utilities in Massachusetts, including three crews from the Taunton Municipal Light Plant, one from the North Attleboro Electric Department and one from the Wellesley Municipal Light Plant, are assisting with the efforts.

Four crews from Asplundh Tree Expert Company are also helping.

“Our first priority continues to be the securing of all downed wires and hazardous sites. This process sometimes makes it necessary to disconnect power lines that are damaged, which results in even more customers losing power in the short term,” Wallingford Electric said in a statement. “We ask our customers for their understanding as we continue to take these steps to ensure that all serious hazards are properly addressed.”

Customers who are without power should determine whether there is damage to the service connection to the home or business, the utility said.

A licensed electrician will have to repair any customer-owned facilities before the municipal power supply can safely restore power.

Customers who have questions about which components of their electrical service they are responsibility for should call the WED Storm Call Center at 203-265-5055 and more information is posted online here.

Customers with emergency generators are asked to use them properly to keep linemen safe as they work to restore power.

Wallingford Electric asks residents not to connect a home generator directly to your home or business wiring. It should instead be connected through an approved cut-off switch that will automatically disconnect the home or business from the power grid when the generator is being used.

This work must be done by a licensed electrician.
 



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[No Evidence of Tornadoes: Officials]]> Wed, 24 Jun 2015 11:18:06 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/9a573c48de984f42a7d76ce3177a50fd.JPG.jpg

Powerful storms with more than 90-mile-per-hour winds came through Connecticut on Tuesday, but there is no evidence of tornadoes, according to the state Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security.

The National Weather Service estimates that peak wind speeds of 90 to 95 miles-per-hour in the hardest hit areas were the result of multiple microbursts, or straight line winds, but not the result of tornadoes.

A Facebook post from the state department cites the National Weather Service:

“There is no evidence of low level rotation and we are exceedingly confident the severe wind damage was caused by a 80 kt Microburst,” the state posted, citing I. Ross Dickman, of the US National Weather Service New York NY


 

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<![CDATA[State of Emergency Declared for Ridgefield in Wake of Storms]]> Tue, 23 Jun 2015 21:11:41 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Tree+down+in+Ridgefield+1200.jpg

The First Selectman of Ridgefield has declared a state of emergency because of significant damage from the storms after powerful storms knocked power out across the state and brought down trees and wires.

Ridgefield officials Tweeted that downed trees and wires are blocking many roads.

Power is out for 49 percent of Ridgefield, according to the latest power outage report from Eversource. That is affecting 5,226 customers.

Eversource crews are in town and more have been called in.

Once the front passes the humidity drops on Tuesday night, Wednesday features sunny, warm and dry weather. There will likely be partial sun Thursday through the following Monday with a chance of rain.

Parks & Recreation at 195 Danbury Road is open regular hours for showers and charging devices until 10 p.m. tonight and will reopen at 6 a.m. on Wednesday.

If you spot severe weather, send photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: Kyle Miller, of Ridgefield
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<![CDATA[Officials Believe Microburst or Tornado Came Through North Haven]]> Wed, 24 Jun 2015 11:27:16 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/North+Haven+tree+down+Blakeslee+Avenue+North+Haven+1200.jpg

North Haven police said they believe a microburst or small tornado struck the west side of North Haven near the Hartford Turnpike corridor on Tuesday.

The National Weather Service estimates that multiple microbursts brought 90 to 95 mile per hour winds to the hardest hit areas of the state, not tornadoes.

Officials from the fire department said they started receiving calls at 4:34 p.m. with reports of trees coming down, trees falling onto house and telephone poles in the road.

To deal with the damage, firefighters were called back and all three volunteer fire companies were deployed.

They discovered most of the damage was on Hartford Turnpike, from Upper State Street to Mount Carmel Avenue, as well as on the side streets of Todd Drive, Todd Drive South, Koczak Court and Christine Road, where hundreds of trees came down.

Dozens of houses and cars were damaged and power lines were down, fire officials said.
Streets were blocked and firefighters went door-to-door, checking 100 residences to see whether anyone was injured, assess property damage and prioritize needs.

Residents with advanced medical needs were evacuated and firefighters ensured that family members were home to care for elderly occupants.

Officials called United Illuminating Co. to turn off power to the area as crews cleared debris, some of which was entangled in power lines.

United Illuminating was reporting 363 power outages in North Haven at one point. There are still 282 power outages as of 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday.

Building officials were called to determine structural integrity of homes or condemn them.

Firefighters also escorted to safety several residents who decided not to stay in their homes on Tuesday night.

Police said they will continue with high-visibility patrols in affected area.

While it might be tempting to explore the affected neighborhoods, police are asking that residents remain home for their safety and the safety of emergency crews.
 
Town officials reached out to the National Weather Service to investigate damage.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Storms Force Cancellation of Coginchaug Graduation]]> Tue, 23 Jun 2015 18:07:41 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/durham+trees+down_1200.jpg

Durham has canceled graduation at Coginchaug Regional High School because of a power outage at the school.

Storms Tuesday afternoon knocked out power to 99-percent of the town, according to Eversource.

No makeup date has been scheduled.



Photo Credit: Catherine Brennan]]>
<![CDATA[90-Mile Per Hour Winds, But No Evidence of Tornadoes ]]> Wed, 24 Jun 2015 18:51:15 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Grantham+Road+in+Wallingford+1200.jpg

Thousands of homes and businesses are still without power around the state the day after storms toppled trees and power lines on Tuesday, prompting tornado watches and severe thunderstorm warnings.

The National Weather Service estimates that wind speeds reached 90 to 95 miles-per-hour in the hardest hit areas, but said there is no evidence of tornadoes. The winds were the result of multiple microbursts, or straight line winds.

Eversource, formerly Connecticut Light & Power, reported more than 55,000 power outages at the height of the storm on Tuesday evening. As of about 6:39 p.m. Wednesday., the outages are around 7,996.

United Illuminating, which services parts of New Haven and Fairfield counties, reported more than 3,200 outages as of 7:20 a.m. on Wednesday, but all power in that part of the state had been restored by late afternoon.

Durham was one of the hardest-hit towns and power was completely out, but some power has been restored. Around 21 percent is still without power on Wednesday evening, as of 6:43 p.m, or 634 customers. Durham emergency management officials said crews will be in town all evening to continue restoring power to homes and businesses.

The power outages prompted school officials to cancel graduation on Tuesday night at Coninchaug Regional High School, which serves students from Durham and Middlefield.

Severe weather toppled trees in several communities, one of which crushed a house on Grantham Road in Wallingford.

The storms moved through at about 50 mph, bringing vivid lightning and damaging winds and officials in North Haven said a small tornado or microburst touched down in the area, destroying homes and causing significant power outages.

Meanwhile, the first selectman of Ridgefield has declared a state of emergency because of the storm damage around town.

Town officials in Shelton said around two dozen trees came down in the northern section of town and police and public works crews responded to the area of 118 and 175 Old Ansonia Road and Chestnut Street at French Street.

Police in Monroe said many trees came down and several roads were blocked off. There are also trees down in Durham, Middletown and East Haddam.

In Norwich, the American Red Cross is operating a shelter at Kelly Middle School, at 25 Mahan Drive at the request of town officials after storms knocked out power to residents.

Wednesday features sunny, warm and dry weather. There will likely be partial sun Thursday through the following Monday with a chance of rain.

If you spot storm damage, send photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Wet Father's Day Ahead]]> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 16:06:41 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/billremnants_1200.jpg

All eyes are on the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill through the Father's Day weekend.

Though there will be some sun early Saturday, clouds will rapidly increase through the day. Temperatures will be in the lower 70s and showers move in late.

The remnants of Bill arrive Sunday. Heavy rain is possible in the morning, before it tapers to scattered showers later in the day.

Some indications are for several inches of rain, while other signs point to a soaker but not enough rain to cause issues. Currently, it would only take two to three inches of rain in a three hour period to cause flash flooding.

Humidity levels will surge to near oppressive levels on Father’s Day with temperatures stuck in the 70s.

Dry weather returns Monday, with temperatures in the 80s, but it doesn’t last. Clouds return Tuesday with the chance for showers.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[Some Sun and Then Thunder to Follow Rainy Morning]]> Sun, 21 Jun 2015 18:49:42 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/62115sweeping_radar_live_ct.jpg

Father's Day had a rainy start, but sunshine peeked through the clouds for part of the day ahead of possible rain and thunder in parts of the state.

Showers and thunderstorms are possible until about 8 p.m.

Summer officially arrived at 12:38 p.m. Sunday with the summer solstice, the longest day of daylight.

There were about 1,222 power outages in Stamford, but it's unknown if they're weather-related.

It's been humid across the state, thanks to Tropical Storm Bill, which also dumped rain in the region as it moved through the Northeast.

Temperatures should be in the 60s this evening.

Monday will be dry. The next chance for thunderstorms and rain is on Tuesday afternoon.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[More Clouds Than Sun Today]]> Thu, 18 Jun 2015 12:52:05 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/June+18+2015+Custom+Map+2.jpg

A warm front over Pennsylvania has resulted in more clouds than sun over Connecticut. There can be a sprinkle or spot shower through this evening with temperatures in the 70s.

Scattered showers continue overnight in advance of a cold front.

The front will clear the state tomorrow morning, so improvement will be the name of the day to close the workweek. Morning clouds give way to afternoon sun!

Temperatures on Friday will be in the 80s inland, upper-70s at the shoreline with little humidity.
Father’s Day weekend is split.

Saturday is the pick of the weekend with mostly sunny conditions, temperatures in the 70s, and little humidity. A beach day!

Bill’s moisture arrives on Sunday and unfortunately makes for a wet end to the weekend. It could be a soaking rain with temperatures in the 70s and high levels of humidity.

Some locations in New England will get more than one inch of rain. The exact location of the rain bullseye still needs to be determined.

Early and middle parts of next week appear to be dry with sun and clouds and temperatures in the 80s.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Wonderful Wednesday Weather]]> Wed, 17 Jun 2015 13:16:20 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/June+17+Live+GON+Currents.jpg

High pressure parked over New England will make for a great day with no humidity and plenty of sunshine. Temperatures will rise into the upper-70s and lower-80s.

A warm front gets hung up over Pennsylvania tomorrow, so there will be lots of clouds over Connecticut and there can be a sprinkle or spot shower with temperatures in the 70s.

An outside chance for a shower continues into Friday morning, but by and large, the workweek will end on a great note with lots of sun. Any morning clouds will move out before long and permit temperatures to rise into the 80s for all.

Father’s Day weekend is split.

Saturday is the pick of the weekend with mostly sunny conditions, temperatures in the 70s and little humidity. Overall, it will be a beach day!

Bill’s moisture arrives on Sunday and unfortunately makes for a wet end to the weekend. It could be a soaking rain with temperatures in the 70s and high levels of humidity.

An early look at next week shows dry conditions with sun and clouds and temperatures near 80 degrees.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Senate Bill Aims to Centralize National Weather Service Forecasting]]> Wed, 17 Jun 2015 13:46:07 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/1445163.jpg

Meteorologists around the country were buzzing after U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-South Dakota) introduced a controversial bill that would radically alter the organization of the National Weather Service.

If signed into law, the National Weather Service Improvement Act eliminates the local forecasting component of the National Weather Service and establishes six regional weather forecast offices.

Though the bill proposes keeping at least one meteorologist in each local geographic area, it goes on to say these meteorologists should, “whenever possible, be located together with state or local emergency managers.”

Three separate offices cover Connecticut, by nature of its geography: Albany, Boston and New York. A group of local meteorologists staff each office to give forecasts and issue weather alerts for the nearby area. There are 122 offices nationwide. Local offices are responsible for issuing warnings for flash flooding, tornadoes and other types of hazardous weather.

There’s no mention of lost jobs in the bill introduced Monday to the Senate’s Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, only a line that says sufficient training will be provided to “minimize employee displacement as a consequence of the plan.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Connecticut) who also serves on the committee said in a statement, "This bill has some promising provisions – such as enhancing forecasting accuracy by investments in equipment and technology, promoting public communication and improving coordination with emergency preparedness officials on the ground."

However, Blumenthal says he has some reservations about the bill. "There are problematic potential impacts, perhaps unintended. One is that local expertise and familiarity with local needs may be lost, if centralization goes too far. I'll be working with my colleagues to strengthen the bill."

Dr. David Titley supports the idea. He is a professor in the meteorology department at The Pennsylvania State University. Titley served in the Navy for more than three decades and said consolidation of the Navy’s weather services had benefits.

“We found that the best forecasts were produced most consistently by forecasters who had lots of experience (and practice) with the weather situation," he said.

Changing up the way the National Weather Service operates is nothing new.

“The idea that the National Weather Service should consider some reorganization is not new – the Senate bill is motivated by a recent report from the National Academy of Sciences," Dr. Jon Nese, associate head of the meteorology program at The Pennsylvania State University, said.

“In fact, right now a management consulting firm is studying the National Weather Service’s organizational structure with the goal of making sure the National Weather service continues to adapt and evolve,” he said.

The bill says money saved through centralization would stay within the organization and be used to improve forecasts.

For example, super-computing capacity would be expanded, investments would be made in research, forecast and severe weather communication with the public would be improved, surface observing networks would be made more robust, and radar coverage would be enhanced, especially in poorly-covered high density population centers.

Dan Sobien, president of the National Weather Service Employees Organization, says it makes no sense. "It's going to cost more money to provide the American public with lesser service and worse forecasts."

"What the bill is actually proposing is actually a degradation of the services that we're trying to create in the weather forecast offices right now.

Senator Thune’s bill instructs the administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association to evaluate the current severe weather warning system and implement a new system for warning the public.

Titley says it’s time to make a plan for the weather service in the 21st century and noted the last restructuring was in the 1990’s.

“Back then the internet was in its infancy, computer weather models were much less advanced, we could not easily move real-time weather and radar data, and no one had heard of an iPhone. Technology has changed all those constraints.”

At the very least, the bill will spark a conversation among meteorologists across the country.

“I think the introduction of this bill will start a very serious conversation between the administration and the Congress, and also within the weather enterprise. There will be many different views, and I hope the discussion will remain civil and respectful,” Titley says.

“I suspect that's all it will do, start a conversation, and if it survives, it will look very different at the end,” Nese said.

Dan Sobien says accuracy will suffer with a regional forecasting setup, and questions where the public prefers to get warning information from.

"If they're sitting in a house somewhere or in a park, presumably in Connecticut, would they rather their tornado warning or severe thunderstorm warning or information about flooding come from the New York City office, or would they rather it come from Washington, D.C.?"



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Possible Today]]> Tue, 16 Jun 2015 12:11:06 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/June+16+Model+HRRR+iCAST+Precip+Clouds+Temp+CT.jpg

An abundance of clouds will prohibit any large thunderstorm outbreak today, though with a few breaks of sun, a storm can come through this afternoon.

Temperatures will stay in the 70s for most today and it will be humid.

A cold front is on the approach, so glorious weather isn’t far away.

Tomorrow looks marvelous with lots of sun, a few puffy clouds and temperatures near 80 degrees. The humidity will be gone, at least for the day.

A warm front lifts north over the region on Thursday, bringing a mix of clouds and sunshine. Temperatures will be in the 70s.

There can be a shower on Friday morning as yet another cold front comes through, but the timing isn’t right for big thunderstorms. It should be a harmless passage.

The rest of Friday features improving conditions. It will be a great evening for outdoor plans as the humidity will be nonexistent.

An early look at the weekend shows primarily dry conditions, though there can be a storm on Sunday and temperatures will be in the 80s inland, 70s at the shore.

What about the tropics? The second named storm of the season, Bill, is making landfall on the Texas coastline today.

More than a foot of rain is possible in portions of eastern Texas, exactly where more rain isn’t needed after a deluge a few weeks back. That moisture heads in the direction of New England early next week.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.

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<![CDATA[Numerous Rain Chances This Week]]> Mon, 15 Jun 2015 14:48:58 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Current+Precip+Today+METAR.jpg

Scattered showers continue across the state on this Monday and it’s already the wettest day since August 13, 2014 – 306 days ago.

Temperatures are stuck in the 60s for most, so it’s on the cool side.

The weather improves a bit tomorrow, with breaks of sunshine, though that can cause trouble.

Showers and thunderstorms will flare up across New York and Pennsylvania in association with a cold front and some storms could reach western portions of Connecticut. Any storms that reach the state will weaken as they move east.

Temperatures will be in the lower-80s inland, with dew points surging into the 60s. It will be very humid.

Wednesday looks marvelous with lots of sun, a few puffy clouds and temperatures near 80 degrees. The humidity will be gone, at least for the day.

Another disturbance comes through on Thursday, with plenty of clouds and scattered showers and storms.

A great finish to the work week is lined up for Friday, with lots of sunshine and no humidity.

What about the tropics? The second named storm of the season, Bill, might form soon.

An organized area of thunderstorms over the south-central Gulf of Mexico is being investigated by Hurricane Hunter aircraft.

More than a foot of rain is possible in portions of Texas, exactly where more rain isn’t needed after a deluge a few weeks back. That moisture heads in the direction of New England early next week.

Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team for the very latest forecast on-air, online and on the app.
 

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<![CDATA[Weekend Beach Forecast]]> Fri, 12 Jun 2015 23:25:59 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/61215+Beach+and+Boating+Weekend+SNE+1200.jpg

High pressure builds in across the northeast this weekend, providing gorgeous weather! Morning clouds on Saturday give way to sunshine fairly quickly. Sunday will be dry with lots sunshine, though high clouds will put a filter on the sky appearance, especially late in the day.

Long Island Sound
Saturday: Morning clouds give way to sunshine. A light breeze off the water develops. Highs: Lower-80s.
Sunday: Sunshine filtered by high clouds. Highs: Near 80 degrees.

Cape Cod
Saturday: Morning clouds give way to sunshine. Highs: Upper-60s.
Sunday: Clouds mixing with sun. Highs: Lower-70s.

Jersey Shore
Saturday: Morning clouds give way to sunshine. Highs: Near 80 degrees.
Sunday: Sunshine filtered by high clouds. Highs: Middle-70s.

Coastal Maine
Saturday: Sunny! Highs: Near 80 degrees.
Sunday: Sunshine filtered by high clouds. Highs: Middle-70s.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>