<![CDATA[NBC Connecticut - Connecticut Weather News and Coverage]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/weather/stories http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC_Connecticut.png NBC Connecticut http://www.nbcconnecticut.comen-usTue, 25 Jul 2017 04:57:38 -0400Tue, 25 Jul 2017 04:57:38 -0400NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Today's Forecast]]> http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/first+alert_weather+1200.jpg

EXCLUSIVE FIRST ALERT 10-DAY FORECAST

Tonight: Overcast with a few showers. Lows in the 50s.

Tuesday: Mainly cloudy with an isolated rain shower. Highs in the upper 60s.

Wednesday: Abundant sunshine. Highs near 80.

Thursday: Increasing clouds. Breezy. Highs near 80.

Friday: Rain and thunderstorms possible. Highs in the low to mid 70s.

Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the low 80s.

Sunday: Mixed clouds and sunshine. Highs in the low 80s.

Monday: Lots of sunshine. Highs in the mid 80s.

Tuesday: Intervals of clouds and sunshine. Highs in the mid 80s.

Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower to middle 80s.

Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower to middle 80s.

Get your detailed precision First Alert 10-day forecast plus hour-by-hour weather and interactive radar by downloading the NBC Connecticut app.

More detailed forecast here

Maps and radar here

Active weather alerts here

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Tonight
Mostly clear, with a low around 59. West wind around 5 mph becoming calm after midnight.
Thursday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 84. Calm wind becoming west 5 to 7 mph in the afternoon.
Thursday Night
A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2am. Patchy fog after 5am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 68. South wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Friday
A chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 7am. Patchy fog before 7am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 86. Light south wind increasing to 5 to 9 mph in the morning. Winds could gust as high as 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 40%. New rainfall amounts of less than a tenth of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.
Friday Night
A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Patchy fog before 1am, then patchy fog after 4am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 70. Southwest wind 5 to 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%.
Saturday
A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Patchy fog before 7am. Otherwise, partly sunny, with a high near 82. Chance of precipitation is 40%.
Saturday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 62.
Sunday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 82.
Sunday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 60.
Monday
A chance of showers after noon. Partly sunny, with a high near 76. Chance of precipitation is 40%.
Monday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 56.
Tuesday
A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 77. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Tuesday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 56.
Wednesday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 79.M



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut
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<![CDATA[Get Closing Alerts]]> Mon, 11 Nov 2013 16:23:20 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/closing+central+first+alert.jpg
View Full Story

Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[Warmer Weather by Midweek]]> Mon, 24 Jul 2017 17:49:12 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Warmer+Air+Web+Lead.gif

The weather has been cool and dreary to start the week but changes are coming by Wednesday.

Temperatures Monday afternoon ranged from the upper 50s to middle 60s which is 20 to 30 degrees below normal. 

Expect a cool night ahead with temperatures falling into the low to middle 50s for inland areas of the state and near 60 along the shoreline. 

Temperatures on Tuesday will be a few degrees warmer with high temperatures forecasted to reach the upper 60s to near 70. 

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More summer-like weather moves in by Wednesday with mostly sunny skies and temperatures forecasted in the upper 70s to low 80s. 

Take a look at the temperature trend over the next seven days.

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<![CDATA[Solar Eclipse: What to Expect]]> Fri, 21 Jul 2017 21:34:17 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/240*120/usa_eclipse_map_print.jpg

One month from today the moon will pass in front of the sun resulting in an incredible display across the United States. The total solar eclipse on August 21st will be the first coast-to-coast total eclipse since 1918. 

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To truly get the full experience you'll have to travel. While the sun will be approximately 70% obscured here in Connecticut totality will occur in only a narrow zone from Oregon to South Carolina. I'll be in Charleston, SC for the eclipse to experience totality and I cannot wait! If it's cloudy or rainy or otherwise overcast I will be very sad :(

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The last time Connecticut experienced a total solar eclipse was January 24, 1925. The next time Connecticut will experience a total solar eclipse is May 1, 2079. They're pretty rare! The 1925 solar eclipse was viewed in totality here in Connecticut. In New York City the New York Times reported the eclipse was total above 96th street as the City was on the southern extent of the total eclipse path.

In totality the moon will complete cover the disk of the sun creating a spectacle most humans have never seen with their own eyes. The sun's atmosphere, the corona, will flash and shimmer as your surroundings plunge into darkness. The temperature drops rapidly and animals are rightfully freaked out. 

Here in Connecticut the partial eclipse will be cool to look at - but you can only do so using eye protection or some type of contraption. Read more here from NASA. I remember the May 10, 1994 partial eclipse here in Connecticut and going outside at school to watch the spectacle. 

If you can't travel to experience this total eclipse you can wait a few years and head up north. Burlington, Vermont and parts of Quebec and upstate New York will experience a total eclipse on April 8, 2024. 

Only one month to go!!


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<![CDATA[Warm Weather Continues into Saturday]]> Fri, 21 Jul 2017 16:38:47 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/SATURDAY+HIGH+TEMPS.png

The warm weather continues with temperatures in the upper 80s to low 90s throughout the state. The warmer temperatures will continue into the first half of the weekend. 

We're forecasting temperatures to reach the low 90s in the Hartford area today. That will bring it to day four of the heat wave. A heat wave is when there are three or more consecutive days with temperatures at or above 90 degrees.

Saturday's weather features mostly cloudy skies. Temperatures will be warm with a light wind out of the northwest. We're forecasting high temperatures in the middle to upper 80s statewide. 

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The chance for rain showers increase as we head into Sunday and especially by Sunday evening. 

A low pressure system will track to the south of Connecticut Sunday afternoon. This could usher in some scattered rain shower or an isolated thunderstorm Sunday afternoon into Sunday evening.  

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Rain and thunderstorms become more widespread as we head into Monday. 


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<![CDATA[Three Tornadoes in Western New York]]> Fri, 21 Jul 2017 16:40:03 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/tornado+1.jpg

Three tornadoes touched down in western New York this afternoon associated with a beast of a supercell that moved onshore from Lake Erie. The storm produced an EF-2 tornado that was on the ground for 5 miles in the town of Hamburg and a second EF-1 tornado on the ground for 2.5 miles in the town of Holland.

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Today, the National Weather Service confirmed a third EF-1 tornado in Allegany County that was on the ground for an additional 4.2 miles.

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For most of the storm's life radar detected a large amount of lofted debris as the tornado sucked all sorts of debris up in to the clouds.

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This Tornado Debris Signature (TDS) was apparent for about 25 minutes as the storm traversed Erie County, NY. Unfortunately, the radar confirmation of the tornado was not relayed by the National Weather Service in warnings, statements or even in the NWS Chatroom available to the media and emergency managers.

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The complex of thunderstorms responsible of the tornado and a smattering of other damage reports in New York and Pennsylvania moved south of Connecticut tonight. Behind it, quieter weather is moving in with plenty of sunshine and warm weather for Friday. High temperatures between 90 and 94 degrees will be common across the state. 


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<![CDATA[A Few Evening Showers and Thunderstorms]]> Thu, 20 Jul 2017 17:56:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/cover+photo+web.png

Temperatures once again surged into the 90s throughout Connecticut. 

A heat wave is when there are three or more consecutive days with temperatures at or above 90 degrees. 

Norwich Public Utilities has issued a power alert and urges its customers to conserve power. For more on the power alert click here.

The high heat and humidity has also led to several cities and towns opening cooling centers. Click here for a list of cooling center throughout the state.

The chances for showers and thunderstorms increase as we head into the evening hours. The thunderstorms could include heavy rain, lightning, and gusty winds. While it doesn't appear the storms will be severe there is a chance a few of them could be on the stronger side.

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Conditions dry out for Friday and Saturday before a rain threat moves in by Sunday afternoon.

Right now we're forecasting showers and thunderstorms to develop Sunday afternoon and continue into Monday.

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<![CDATA[Warming Water ]]> Wed, 19 Jul 2017 21:22:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/image107192017.JPG

A few hot days and the water in Long Island Sound has warmed quickly. The 3-day average water surface temperature from the Ocean Remote Sensing Group and Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory shows a pool of very warm water in the western 2/3 of the Sound.

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25C water temperatures are common from Madison to Greenwich but, as usual, a pocket of much colder water (near 20C) exists around The Race and Fishers Island Sound. 

Here are two water temperature traces from New Haven Habor and New London Harbor showing the big disparity from the central Sound and the eastern Sound. You can see a definite diurnal trend in the water temperature in New Haven (warmest water during the evening and coolest around mid morning) while the New London water temperature shows no such trend. 

[[435513143, C, 681, 87]]

[[435513153, C, 681, 87]]

If you're wondering average water temperature peaks in New Haven during August while New London maxes out during the last 15 days of July and first 15 days of August at 75F and 72F, respectively.

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The coldest water in summer on the east coast is in Eastport, Maine that peaks at a bone crushing maximum temperature of 51F.  


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<![CDATA[Waterspout Comes Ashore in North Carolina]]> Wed, 19 Jul 2017 20:03:44 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/DIT_NAT_WATERPOUT_NC_071917_1-150050857755700001.jpg

A beachgoer captured footage of a waterspout off the coast of Surf City, North Carolina, on July 19. The National Weather Service says the waterspout came ashore as a tornado with winds up to 70 mph. The NWS advises people to seek shelter out of the path of a waterspout.

]]>
<![CDATA[Another Scorcher with Temps into the 90s]]> Wed, 19 Jul 2017 16:10:33 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/high+temp+today+cover+photo.png

Today will mark the second day of a four day heat wave with inland high temperatures once again reaching the low 90s.

Temperatures will be a bit cooler along the shoreline with a light wind out of the southwest. 

Here's a look at today's forecasted high temperatures,

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The increased temperatures has led several towns and cities to open cooling centers throughout the state. Click here for a complete list.

Great weather if you're hitting the beaches. Temperatures along the beaches will reach the middle 80s. The only caveat is the humidity we're forecasting oppressive humidity along the Connecticut shoreline. 

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Temperatures will be a bit cooler by the weekend with high temperatures in the low to middle 80s and scattered rain showers. 


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<![CDATA[Another Heat Wave]]> Tue, 18 Jul 2017 20:33:28 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/gfs_t2maf_slp_east2_9.png

Tuesday likely marked the first day of 2017's third heat wave. The mercury reached 90F at Bradley Airport and we're expecting several additional days at or above 90. Today also was our ninth 90 degree day of 2017. 

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It's a pretty classic setup with a Bermuda High allowing warmth to move in from the west as the jet stream retreats into Canada.

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It doesn't look like the warmth will stick around for too much longer as another dip in the jet stream and cooler weather moved back for the weekend. At this point a round of showers and thunderstorms appears likely for a portion of the weekend ahead of our next jet stream disturbance. Stay tuned for more specifics. 


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<![CDATA[Heat Wave Forecasted Through Friday]]> Tue, 18 Jul 2017 17:24:27 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/heat+alert+foto1.JPG

NBC Connecticut Meteorologists are forecasting a heat wave to begin on Wednesday and continue through Friday.

High temperatures for inland Connecticut are expected to reach the low 90s.

A heat wave is declared when there a three consectuive days with temperatures at or above 90 degrees.

High temperatures tomorrow are forecasted to reach 93 degrees in the Hartford area with temperatures a bit cooler along the shoreline. 

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Take a look at the temperature trend over the next seven days. Relief arrives by Saturday with high temperatures in the low to middle 80s.

INLAND:

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SHORELINE:

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In addition to the high temperatures the humidity will also be quite high. Very humid to oppressively humid conditions are expected over the next several days.


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<![CDATA[Increased Heat and Humidity This Week]]> Mon, 17 Jul 2017 16:56:34 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/HIGH+TEMP+COVER+PHOTO.png

The First Alert Exclusive 10 Day Forecast features high temperatures in the 80s and 90s with a chance for thunderstorms this week.

The average high temperature in the Hartford area for this time of year is 85 degrees. 

Temperatures are forecasted to reach the low 90s by Wednesday and Thursday.

INLAND: 

[[434967563, C]]

SHORELINE:

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As temperatures increase the humidity will also climb. Dew point values are expected to reach the low 70s by Wednesday which is considered oppressive humidity.

Take a look at the dew point trend,

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The increased heat and humidity will also lead to a scattered thunderstorm threat Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. Scattered storms are expected during the afternoon hours.


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<![CDATA[Evening Update: Storms Winding Down in CT; Cleanup Continues]]> Thu, 13 Jul 2017 17:53:12 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Woodbridge+Trees+down.jpg

The severe thunderstorm warnings in Connecticut have expired as of 5:30 p.m.

The cleanup continues across the state after localized reports of damage.  Storms brought down trees in Woodbridge and there are reports of storm damage in Ansonia from a possible downburst or microburst.  Trees also came down in other towns.  Video showed a tree down in Milford.

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In Ansonia, the reports of storm damage include trees down on Prospect and Beaver streets and one video shows wild winds and rain. In Woodbridge, photos show trees down near Hickory Lane.

Emergency crews responded to the North Stonington Fairgrounds for a report of a person struck by lightning Thursday afternoon. Because of weather, the North Stonington Fair is closed tonight, according to Rockwell Amusements. 

The main threats with the storms are strong winds, hail and heavy rain, which could lead to flash flooding.  Areas of the state could still face rain and winds, though the severe aspect to the weather is winding down.

Here are some of the key highlights from today's storms, according to chief meteorologist Brad Field:

2 PM: ANSONIA: multiple trees and wires down on Prospect & Beaver

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2 PM: WOODBRIDGE: tree down Hickory Lane

3:25 PM: WESTON: multiple trees, wires down

3:52 PM: BRIDGEPORT: gust 48 mph

Some flash flood watches and severe thunderstorm watches remain in effect for parts of the state through 9 p.m.

Track conditions in real time using the interactive radar.

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Low pressure from the eastern Great Lakes moves in Friday and temperatures will cool down significantly.  The cooling will also include a decrease in humidity to more comfortable levels.

Make sure to download the NBC Connecticut app for up-to-the-minute weather updates. Click here for information on downloading our app.



Photo Credit: Submitted
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<![CDATA[Tornado Touches Down in Central Iowa]]> Wed, 12 Jul 2017 16:11:46 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/DIT_NAT_IOWA_TORNADO_071217_1-149987409750900001.jpg

A tornado in Conroy, Iowa, was caught on video. The twister damaged crops and buildings on three properties but no one was injured.

]]>
<![CDATA[Thunderstorms Roll Through CT]]> Wed, 12 Jul 2017 18:42:19 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/CoverPhoto1.png

Severe thunderstorms moved across parts of Connecticut on Wednesday afternoon.

In East Windsor, storms brought trees and wires down, closing Newberry Road and Church Street, according to police. In Windham a large pine tree was struck by lightning causing it to fall across Route 14 briefly closing the road to traffic.

In East Granby, Granby, and Windsor Locks hail to the size of quarters fell Wednesday afternoon.

Thunderstorms with heavy rain and lightning will move through southern Connecticut, south of I-84, over through 8 p.m.

NBC Connecticut meteorologists have issued a First Alert for today and Thursday.

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Take a look at live interactive radar.

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The main threat with these storms will be damaging winds and heavy rain, which could lead to flooding issues. 

Another thunderstorm threat exists on Thursday with another chance for damaging winds and heavy rain. 

Make sure to download the NBC Connecticut app for up-to-the-minute weather updates. Click here for information on downloading our app.


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<![CDATA[More Showers & Thunderstorms This Afternoon]]> Tue, 11 Jul 2017 12:37:56 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/cover+photo+%282%29.png

The first batch of heavy rain and thunderstorms moved through the state early this morning. We're keeping our eyes on a second round of showers and storms for the afternoon.

A healthy amount of rain fell statewide. Hartford received the most with just under two inches while New Haven received the least at around a half inch. 

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The afternoon thunderstorm threat is rather low. We're forecasting a few scattered showers and an isolated thunderstorm to impact the state between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. 

Take a look at First Alert Future Radar at 3:00 p.m.,

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No weather issues expected for this evening. Skies will be partly cloudy with temperatures falling into the upper 60s.


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<![CDATA[Storms Possible This Afternoon]]> Tue, 11 Jul 2017 09:57:31 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Model+RPM4+Precip+Cloud+CT+%289%291.png

NBC Connecticut Meteorologists have issued a First Alert ahead of Tuesday's severe weather threat. 

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The first round of storms arrived before 5 a.m., with some thunder and lightning.

The second round of storms will arrive Tuesday afternoon and linger into the evening. Storms are forecasted to arrive in the state between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. A few of the storms could be severe with damaging winds and frequent lightning. 

Take a look at the storm risk for Tuesday, the highest risk is damaging winds a slight chance of a brief tornado or isolated flooding. 

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Stay with the NBC Connecticut First Alert Weather Team for the latest on Tuesday's severe weather threat. 


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<![CDATA[28 Years Ago - The 1989 Tornado Outbreak]]> Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:48:40 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/174*120/Schohariecountyemergencymanagement1.jpg

There are only a few “classic” northeastern U.S. tornado outbreaks that jump out in your mind. The 1985 Pennsylvania outbreak is one, the 1998 Pennsylvania/New York outbreak is another, and so is the 1989 northeast outbreak. The epicenter of that outbreak was right here in Connecticut with an F4 tornado touchdown in Hamden and New Haven.

The atmosphere couldn’t have been more primed for a big tornado event. Here’s the morning weather balloon launch and sounding from Albany.

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A classic elevated mixed layer with a dry adiabatic layer from 625mb through 750mb is present. What is most striking, however, is the exceptional wind shear in the atmosphere. Winds at 500mb are out of the northwest at 80 knots while in the boundary layer winds are out of the south-southeast at 10 knots! That’s about as strong as it gets.

The presence of the “EML” allowed for significant instability to develop during the heating of the day. Prior to the tornado in Connecticut temperatures reached the low and middle 80s with dew points in excess of 70F. A quick and dirty modification of that sounding for 30/22 shows just how explosively unstable the atmosphere was.

The first tornado touched down in upstate New York west of Albany and was on the ground for an incredible 42 miles. That same supercell went on to produce a series of tornadoes in Connecticut. The first tornado touched down near Route 4 in Cornwall and continued south into Bantam. The second tornado touched down in Watertown and Waterbury. The most violent of the tornadoes touched down in Hamden and continued south into New Haven.

The weather charts during the event were just incredible for a northeastern U.S. tornado outbreak with a strong disturbance moving out of southern Quebec into northern New England.

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Through the day 500mb heights actually rise over southern New England with the best QG forcing displaced far to the north. Still, after the initial convective initiation in the morning those storms were able to propagate southeast into our area. The elevated mixed layer not only allowed strong instability to develop – it likely also helped keep convection relatively discrete. The atmosphere in many locations was “capped” – just enough CIN to prevent widespread convective initiation – but not capped enough to prevent all convection. The best QG forcing to the north also helped convection remain relatively scattered.

The damage in Connecticut was substantial with hundreds and hundreds of homes and businesses destroyed. Many people in the New Haven suburbs – including North Haven and North Branford were caught in the hail core of the storm with golf ball size hail or larger. Southeast of where the tornado lifted in Newhallville substantial wind damage occurred with many of the pine trees near Lake Saltonstall on the Branford/East Haven line snapped in half.

Here is some of our coverage from the 6 p.m. news on July 11, 1989.

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There were other tornadoes that day – some in northern Massachusetts, others just west of Danbury in Putnam County, and another swarm in northern New Jersey. If we were able to look at radar data (which sadly, we cannot) we’d probably see a line of supercells across the region.

On a personal note, the 1989 tornado event is my first weather memory as a kid. At the time I was living in Branford but on vacation with my family on Cape Cod. When I heard about the tornado back home I was devastated! I couldn’t believe that I missed “the big one” back home. I guess I’ve been a weather weenie for 25 full years now!



Photo Credit: Schoharie County Emergency Management
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<![CDATA[Scattered Showers, Strong Storms Possible Saturday]]> Sat, 08 Jul 2017 12:27:30 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/SCATTERSED+SHOWERS+STORMS+7-8-17.png

The NBC Connecticut meteorologists are tracking the chance for a few scattered showers and strong storms Saturday afternoon and early evening.

A warm and humid air mass in place will interact with a cold front later today to increase the chance of storms. The best chance of a strong or even severe storm will be in northern Connecticut.

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The storms today may produce brief torrential downpours and strong to damaging wind gusts. The best chance for storms will be 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. in western Connecticut until 6  p.m.to 7 p.m. in the south and east.

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The cold front approaching will usher in drier air and a top 10 -type of day for Sunday with sunshine, low humidity and warm temperatures into the low 80s.



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut
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<![CDATA[Rain Gradually Tapers off Through the Afternoon]]> Fri, 07 Jul 2017 15:59:30 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/cover+photo+hrrr.png

Some parts of Connecticut woke up to heavy rains Friday morning, but things will start drying out as the day goes on.

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Heading out later this evening? Most of the rain will be out of the state by 4 p.m. 

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There is a slight chance that a scattered shower will move across the state later tonight. Here's a look at First Alert Future Radar which shows a few scattered showers moving through the western portion of the state. 

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The weekend features afternoon showers and thunderstorms with beautiful weather arriving by Sunday. Take a look at the Inland and Shoreline 3 Day Forecast. 

INLAND:

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SHORELINE:

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<![CDATA[Friday Soaker?]]> Wed, 05 Jul 2017 19:42:07 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/hires_ref_nyc_43.png

Some of the pieces are coming together for a Friday morning soaker though it is by no means a certainty. A small area of low pressure called a mesolow is going to scoot toward Connecticut but it's track is still not clear. Virtually all of our computer models show this feature to various degrees around daybreak but a few miles will make a big difference between a soaker and a few showers. 

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These things are fickle. Unlike a large winter nor'easter these lows are very small, can be difficult to predict, and can form with little advance notice as they're primarily driven by complex interactions with thunderstorms. For example, the mesolow could easily form 200 miles farther south in an area of deeper convection over the Gulf Stream delivering us virtually no adverse weather.

The track of the low is critical. In a very narrow area just north of the low a substantial amount of rain is possible. Along a warm front moist air from the ocean will be forced to rise rapidly resulting in heavy precipitation (very deep warm cloud depths also increase the risk for very heavy rain). This band will likely be relatively stationary and it's the kind of setup than can produce 2"-4" of rain in a short period of time. Is it over central New Jersey or is it over New Haven? I don't know. 

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In addition to heavy rain there is the potential for severe weather along and just south of the warm front. Very strong shear and modest instability in the warm sector could promote severe storms. At this point that will most likely be over the Atlantic Ocean but it's awfully close to tickling the south coast and Long Island. We like to call this a "Sunrise Surprise" with these warm fronts draped along the coast. 

Stay tuned for more on this one!


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<![CDATA[Maine's Tornado Outbreak]]> Tue, 04 Jul 2017 20:51:13 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/DDq9N0UXYAEgfPZ.jpg

It didn't feature a significant tornado but Saturday's tornado outbreak in Maine was exceptionally impressive with four separate touchdowns in a small area in the southwestern part of the state. While the "outbreak" wasn't particularly well forecast the National Weather Service in Gray, ME did an outstanding job issuing tornado warnings Saturday afternoon. 

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The weather setup that developed Saturday afternoon was a classic one for tornadoes. A sufficient amount of low level moisture, locally strong wind shear in the lowest few thousand feet of the atmosphere, and adequate instability to allow storms to form all came together in a small area of northern New England. A warm front draped across central New Hampshire and southwestern Maine was sufficient to maintain supercells that occasionally produced tornadoes. 

[[432559463, C]]

This sounding off the HRRR shows an even more impressive environment than the SPC mesoanalysis pictured above indicates. High levels of instability and even higher values of low level shear may be more indicative of the actual environment here. 

The storms on radar were exceptionally impressive for Maine and New Hampshire. 7 tornado warnings were issued on July 1st which was the most the Gray, ME office has issued in an entire year!

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The Maine tornadoes are a good reminder that ingredients for severe weather - including tornadoes - can quickly come together even when it seems unlikely 6 or 12 hours earlier. This event is a really good reminder of the importance of being aware of fast changing weather conditions. The folks at the NWS Gray office did a tremendous job maintaining situational awareness and getting the word out quickly. 



Photo Credit: Courtesy: Jackson Witherill
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<![CDATA[Beautiful Weather from Inland Connecticut to the Beaches]]> Mon, 03 Jul 2017 13:42:51 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/high+temps+today+%281%29.png

Another day of gorgeous weather is expected with mostly sunny skies and temperatures rising into the middle to upper 80s.

Take a look at our high temperature forecast for today. High temperatures ranging from the middle 80s along the water to the upper 80s for inland parts of the state.

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The weather will be spectacular if you're hitting the beaches or heading out on the boat. Make sure to wear plenty of sunscreen as the sun index is forecasted at an 8 out of 10.

Here's a look at the beach and boating forecast which features a light wind out of the west, current water temperature of 66 degrees, and waves less than a foot.

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The weather will remain quite for Independence Day and right through the end of the week.

Let us know how you're enjoying the beautiful weather. Tweet at us or Facebook us using the hash-tag #NBCCT. 



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<![CDATA[FIRST ALERT: Evening Storms Could Impact Holiday Plans]]> Sat, 01 Jul 2017 15:14:27 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/CoverPhoto.png

NBC Connecticut Meteorologists have issued a First Alert for strong to potentially severe thunderstorms this evening. 

The greatest threat for strong storms exists through portions of Litchfield and Fairfield counties. 

The National Weather Service has issued a Severe Thunderstorm Watch for Litchfield and Hartford counties until 9 p.m. this evening.

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The risk for tonight's storms has caused many towns and cities to either postpone or cancel their firework festivities. Click here for a complete updated list on if your city or town has cancelled/postponed tonights event.

While a few scattered showers can be expected through the afternoon the main thunderstorm threat holds off until after 6 p.m. 

Here's a look at Live First Alert Interactive Radar,

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Storms are expected to move into Litchfield and Fairfield counties between 6 and 7 p.m. Take a look at First Alert Future Radar at 7 p.m. this evening. You can see a line of strong thunderstorms moving into the state. 

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The greatest storm threat with these storms are damaging winds followed by localized flooding issues. 

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The storms will move east through the evening impacting New Haven and Hartford counties by 8 p.m. 

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The storms will drastically weaken as they continue east into eastern Connecticut as the atmosphere won't be as unstable. Here's a look at First Alert Future Radar at 9p.m.

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Make sure to download the NBC Connecticut App for the latest forecast and live interactive radar. Click here for more details on how to download it.


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<![CDATA[Morning Forecast for Saturday July 1]]> Sat, 01 Jul 2017 09:23:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/7117_WEATHER_WEB_1200x675_981256259813.jpg ]]> <![CDATA[Severe Thunderstorm Warning Issued for Parts of State]]> Fri, 30 Jun 2017 19:05:46 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/prejulystorms.jpg

Click here for Interactive First Alert Radar, your hourly forcast, and your Exclusive First Alert 10 Day Forecast.

Severe thunderstorm warnings have been issued for parts of New Haven and Middlesex counties.

Severe thunderstorm watches were posted Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland and Windham counties as well.

The storms could contain heavy rain, vivid lightning and gusty winds.

NBC Connecticut's team of meteorologists has issued a First Alert for the storms, which could began to move into the state around  5 p.m. The threat will diminish after 10 p.m.

Fireworks displays around the state could be impacted by the storms this evening.

Areas to the north and west of Connecticut could see more significant storms, including the threat of tornadoes.



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[Protect Yourself From Lightning Strikes]]> Wed, 28 Jun 2017 10:43:17 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/thunderstorm1.jpg

Do you know how to stay safe when a thunderstorm hits? Learn what to do, and what not to do, to protect yourself when lightning strikes.

]]>
<![CDATA[Your Photos from Tuesday Thunderstorms]]> Wed, 28 Jun 2017 08:01:50 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/198*120/ashford+cover+photo.PNG ]]> <![CDATA[Thunderstorms Moving Out of State]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 20:31:11 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/214*120/Kimberly-Ellis.jpg

The thunderstorm threat has come to an end. 

Check out some of the photos that were sent in to NBC Connecticut. Several towns throughout the state experienced hail.

A rather cool night is expected with temperatures falling into the middle 50s. Beautiful weather is expected by tomorrow with mostly sunny skies and high temperatures in the middle to upper 70s. 



Photo Credit: Kimberly Ellis
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<![CDATA[Oppressive Humidity Followed by Showers & Thunderstorms]]> Fri, 23 Jun 2017 12:28:59 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/cover+photo+%281%29.png

The humidity is downright oppressive today and temperatures are well into the 80s throughout the entire state.

High temperatures coupled with high humidity is leading to heat index (what the temperature feels like) values in the low to middle 90s.

In addition to the heat we're also tracking some showers and thunderstorms as we head into the afternoon and evening. 

We're forecast scattered showers and thunderstorms to develop after 4 p.m. The best chance for showers and thunderstorms is southern Connecticut. 

Take a look at First Alert Future Radar at 8 p.m. You can see widespread showers moving across Fairfield and New Haven counties. 

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Showers will continue into the evening hours with a scattered thunderstorm possible. First Alert Future Radar showers widespread showers throughout Hartford county moving into eastern Connecticut at 11 p.m. 

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<![CDATA[Thunderstorm Warnings Expire But Threat Remains]]> Wed, 21 Jun 2017 16:52:49 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/clouds+on+June+21+2017.jpg

Severe thunderstorm warnings have expired for Hartford, Litchfield and Tolland counties, but the NBC Connecticut First Alert weather team continues to keep an eye on First Alert Doppler Radar.

There's enough instability in the atmosphere that will allow the storms that do form to become strong to potentially severe.

Take a look at First Alert Future Radar at 5 p.m. you can see scattered thunderstorms moving from northwest to southeast. 

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The thunderstorm threat will come to an end after 7 p.m. with lingering showers impacting southeastern Connecticut.

The greatest risk with these storms will be damaging wind gusts. There's a medium risk of damaging wind gusts and a low risk for hail, flooding, and tornadoes. 

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Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[Remembering the 1995 Hail Storm]]> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 21:38:49 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/165*120/1995hail31.jpg

June 20, 1995 was a sultry and oppressive day. Temperatures in the 90s down to the water with dew points in the mid 70s drove heat index values above 100º. At the same time an elevated mixed layer (EML) moved overhead creating an exceptionally unstable and volatile air mass.

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This weather balloon sounding from Albany shows the EML with very steep lapse rates between 650mb and 500mb. This means that the temperature above 10,000 feet was decreasing very rapidly with height (nearly 10ºC/km). With an oppressively hot and humid airmass in place the atmosphere was primed for a big explosion.

That explosion came north of the Massachusetts border when a supercell developed and began moving south.

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What was remarkable about this storm was the amount of large hail it dropped during its trek through Connecticut. Baseball-sized hail was reported in 3 towns – Vernon, Manchester, and Deep River.

The relatively isolated storm (typical of EML days) continued to move due south and produced a gorgeous looking radar image. The outflow boundary of rain cooled air surged west across Hartford and Waterbury while a backdoor cold front that started near Boston around 10 a.m. finally caught up with the storm at the mouth of the Connecticut River.

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The storm was the most intense over Deep River and Lyme, possibly due to the interaction with the backdoor cold front moving from east to west. Here’s an excerpt from the National Weather Service Storm Data publication.

A cold front moving across the area generated severe thunderstorms which produced large hail and gusty winds. Baseball-size hail lasted for up to 20 minutes in Deep River causing hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage. The hailstones broke hundreds of windows in buildings and automobiles, tore holes in roofs, dented siding and automobiles, and ruined gardens. Some automobiles were totaled. In one historic building, the hail broke 25 windows, including a 100-year curved window. Thirty-two windows were smashed in an elementary school and its roof was damaged. Most of the damage was covered by insurance.

Here’s a 3-D cross section of the Deep River supercell as it crossed the Connecticut River. What is remarkable is how high the hail core of this storm was.

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In fact this storm had 70 dbz radar echoes up to 30,000 feet with 60dbz up to 45,000 feet! That’s just wild. Here are some memories from people on my Facebook page.

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People in Deep River still remember the hail storm vividly. Arlene Macmillan sent me these pictures of the hail (and hail damage) at her house from the 1995 storm. You can see ripped off leaves, broken shutters and windows, along the piles of hail stones. Arlene recalls the largest of the stones being billiard ball size (which is 2.25″ in diameter).

[[429787123, C]]

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I asked Arlene a few questions about what she remembered from that day: The biggest stones were the size of billiard balls.

I got my car into the garage before the hail started. My husband was around Middletown, driving home, when he saw a black cloud over Deep River. He arrived at home less than 5 minutes after hail stopped, and saw a foot high pile of leaves covering the ground. Nothing happened to his car, not even rain. We rented out another house behind ours. $3,000 in glass damage alone at both. Sorry I don’t have a picture of our house. It was sided with weathered cedar shakes and looked as though the house had been machine gunned.

While the storm had a broad mesocyclone and was rotating during its lifetime it never produced a tornado. The rotation remained broad and aloft and never came to the surface. The closest the storm came to becoming tornadic was south of Deep River in Essex and Old Saybrook when the rotation began to lower following the interaction with the backdoor cold front.

The overall setup was not conducive to tornadoes but certainly was conducive to mega-hail, particularly where the complex interaction between the supercell and a backdoor cold front was taking place over Lyme and Deep River.



Photo Credit: Arlene Macmillan / Deep River
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<![CDATA[Lots of Sunshine with a Few Showers]]> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 17:50:08 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/First+Alert+Future+Radar+Tomorrow1.png

Drier air is moving into the state and pleasant weather is expected over the next couple of days. 

Tomorrows forecast features a mix of sun and clouds with an isolated shower or thunderstorm possible during the afternoon hours. High temperatures tomorrow will reach the low to middle 80s. 

Take a look at First Alert Future Radar at 4 p.m. tomorrow: 

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Thursday is the pick of the week with mostly sunny skies the entire day and high temperatures reaching the low to middle 80s.

You can expect decent weather if you're heading to the Travelers Championship at the TPC River Highlands. There's a slight chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms Friday afternoon and evening. A few showers will linger into Saturday morning. 

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<![CDATA[Dos and Don'ts in Extreme Heat]]> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 16:13:16 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/DIT_NAT_EXTREME_HEAT_DOS_DONTS_062017_1-149798518809100001.jpg

When the temperatures begin to rise, it's important to know what you should and shouldn't do to keep you and your loved ones safe. Here are some tips.

]]>
<![CDATA[Scattered Thunderstorms and Showers Continue Tonight]]> Mon, 19 Jun 2017 19:37:35 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/219*120/SALISBURYDAMAGE.PNG

The severe weather threat has greatly diminished however scattered showers and thunderstorms will continue through the night. 

Tree damage was reported in Cornwall, Salisbury, and Granby. 

First Alert Future Radar shows scattered showers and thunderstorms this evening at 11 p.m. 

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Showers will come to an end early tomorrow morning. We're expecting most of the rain shower activity to be out of the state by 7 a.m.

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The weather looks quite pleasant for Tuesday, less humidity and clearer skies. We're forecasting high temperatures to reach the middle 80s for inland Connecticut and near 80 along the shoreline. 

[[429522313, C]]


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<![CDATA[Severe Weather Possible Monday]]> Sun, 18 Jun 2017 12:31:20 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/hires_ref_nyc_36.png

A round of strong thunderstorms on Monday may bring strong winds, flash flooding and even the threat of a tornado to parts of southern New England. The highest severe weather threat appears to be in western Connecticut. 

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Loads of moisture coupled with the development of powerful winds (over 60 mph) several thousand feet above our heads has us concerned about the severe weather threat on Monday. This is a model sounding from the NAM model showing the potential for rotating thunderstorms given the strength of low level wind shear. The rapid increase and turning of wind with height is known as wind shear and this is a critical ingredient for tornado development. 

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While only a low risk - tornadoes are possible in this kind of environment. Whether or not they form is a question and the highest threat appears as if it will set up just west of Connecticut. Any storm that starts rotating also has the potential to produce damaging straight line winds. 

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The timing of storms remains a bit uncertain. The highest threat will be late afternoon and early evening as a line of thunderstorms approaches but we cannot rule out storms developing ahead of the line as early as 1 or 2 p.m. We call these discrete storms. Additionally, as the mid level winds will be out of the southwest and parallel to the front, there is the potential for very heavy rain. A flash flood threat exists in western Connecticut. 

Stay weather aware Monday! 


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<![CDATA[Evening Update: Thunderstorms Moving Through Connecticut]]> Mon, 19 Jun 2017 19:01:16 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Hrrr+Forecast.png

A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Hartford, New Haven, Litchfield and Fairfield Counties and a thunderstorm watch is in effect for the rest of the state.

Visit the NBC Connecticut First Alert Weather page for our First Alert Doppler Interactive Radar, your exclusive first alert 10-day forecast and hourly forecast.

The severe storm prediction center (SPC) has placed most of Connecticut in a “Slight” risk of severe weather.  A portion of western CT falls in an “enhanced” risk of severe storms.  An enhanced risk in western Connecticut means there is a higher threat for storms to become severe.

The main storm threats for any storms that do form would be damaging winds and hail.  With the tropical –like humidity in the air we can also expect briefly heavy rain which could cause flooding.
Stay with the First Alert forecast team through the weekend as new data continues to come into the forecast center.  

We expect strong winds, hail and very heavy rain. There is even a slight threat for a small tornado. The National Weather Service has issued a "flash flood watch" for Fairfield, Litchfield, Tolland, New Haven and Hartford counties for this afternoon and evening.  The threat for 1 to 2 inches of rain falling in a short amount of time is possible.

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The storm prediction center (SPC) has placed most of Connecticut in a “slight” risk of severe weather. A portion of western Connecticut falls in an “enhanced” risk of severe storms. An enhanced risk in western Connecticut means there is a higher threat for storms to become severe.

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The timing of the storms should be after 2 p.m.  The best chance for the storms moving through would be after noon and evening from west to east.

Stay with the First Alert forecast team as new data continues to come into the forecast center.

Visit the NBC Connecticut First Alert Weather page for our First Alert Doppler Interactive Radar, your exclusive first alert 10-day forecast and hourly forecast.


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<![CDATA[Rising Chance for Rain]]> Thu, 15 Jun 2017 14:05:23 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/hires_ref_boston_29.png

Tomorrow is looking a bit damp after an awesome 2 days of weather. The timing - and amount of rain - is quite difficult to pin down. 

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Warm air will stream in tomorrow above our heads and that will force air to rise resulting in clouds and even a bit of rain. You can see this by looking at the atmosphere about 5,000 feet above our heads. A southerly wind will transport warm and moist air from the ocean northward into Connecticut resulting in clouds and a rising chance for rain.

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Our models are struggling with the timing of the strongest lift. Does it come in during the morning or hold off until afternoon? It's still a bit unclear. At the very least prepare for some rain tomorrow and even a few downpours. With an onshore wind temperatures will be stuck in the 60s for most of the day.

Beyond tomorrow the news is better for the weekend. As a warm front passes Connecticut we will gradually clear things out with warmer weather and even some sunshine by Father's Day. The next round of rain with a few pockets of heavy rain and storms will approach later Monday and Monday night. 


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<![CDATA[Another Day with Comfortable Temperatures ]]> Wed, 14 Jun 2017 18:03:48 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Thursday+High+Temps3.png

Comfortable air has moved into Connecticut following a three day heat wave. 

Temperatures on Wednesday reached the upper 70s and low 80s with very low humidity values. 

High temperatures on Thursday will be a bit cooler, only reaching the middle to upper 70s. 

Here's a look at forecasted high temperatures for tomorrow.

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The weather turns a bit unpleasant as we head into Friday. Right now we're forecasting mostly cloudy skies with scattered showers. Showers will be more widespread during the afternoon and early evening. 

Scattered showers will continue into Fathers Day weekend. The good news is that Saturday looks wetter than Sunday. High temperatures this weekend will range from the middle 70s Saturday to the middle 80s by Sunday.

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<![CDATA[Strong to Severe Thunderstorms This Afternoon]]> Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:17:42 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/UPDATED+HRRR+COVER+PHOTO+WEB.png

Thunderstorms continue to move through the state. Severe Thunderstorms were issued earlier today for stronger storms that moved into Litchfield, Fairfield, and New Haven counties. Luckily there are no reports of storm damage. 

Scattered thunderstorms will continue through the evening hours. Some thunderstorms could be strong to even severe. The main threat with the storms are hail, damaging winds, and frequent lightning. There is also a small threat for minor flooding in a few cities and towns.

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Click here if you're looking for a more in-depth and scientific explanation of today's thunderstorm threat. Ryan Hanrahan has a look at meteorological conditions.

Temperatures surged into the 90s on Tuesday. It's the third consecutive day with temperatures above 90, making it an official heat wave.



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<![CDATA[Powerful Thunderstorms Possible Tuesday]]> Mon, 12 Jun 2017 14:26:01 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/mgWeb_WRF_20170612-150000_ANE_ECONUS_F00283000_PwinterThickness_R4km.png

The ingredients are in place for powerful thunderstorms in some towns tomorrow afternoon. An abundance of instability will fuel storms after 1 p.m. and the potential is there for severe thunderstorms as well.

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One of the questions we have is how widespread will the storms be. The "forcing" in the atmosphere isn't overly strong and so it's unclear how many storms will be able to tap in to all the instability out there. With CAPE values exceeding 2,000 j/kg due in part to steep mid level lapse rates (rapid temperature drop with height 10-20,000 feet above our head) some storms may really take off.

Instability is just one piece of the puzzle. What will prevent this from becoming a more significant severe weather event is the lack of wind shear. Wind shear, or winds changing speed and direction with height, is critical for storms to organize. While supercells or powerful well-organized storm clusters are unlikely I expect we'll see a number of strong "pulse" storms that strengthen and weaken quickly. Localized downbursts and hail is possible along with an unusually large amount of lightning and very heavy rain. 

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One thing to note is that with the unusually steep lapse rates and a northwest flow (offshore wind) the storms will be able to make it all the way to the beaches. This is one of those rare setups that favors Stonington Borough just as much as a town in Litchfield County. 

Be prepared for some nasty storms tomorrow. We'll have you covered all day on-air and online! 



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<![CDATA[Temps Climb into the Middle 90s for Parts of the State]]> Sun, 11 Jun 2017 21:44:10 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/HIGH+TEMPS+TODAY2.png

NBC Connecticut Meteorologists are forecasting high temperatures to reach the middle 90s for inland Connecticut by Sunday afternoon.

Take a look at forecasted high temperatures around the state. Temperatures will be a bit cooler along the shoreline with a wind off of the water. 

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An air quality alert is in effect for the entire state. Those with respiratory issues are encouraged to remain inside. The air quality alert is in effect through 10 p.m. Sunday evening. 

[[427770853, C]]

Sunday is the first day of temperatures that are expected to climb above 90 degrees.


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<![CDATA[Heat Wave Starts This Weekend]]> Sat, 10 Jun 2017 09:44:17 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Sunday+High+Temperatures.png

NBC Connecticut Meteorologists are forecasting high temperatures to rise over the next several days. 

High temperatures on Saturday are forecasted to reach the low to middle 80s for inland Connecticut and middle to upper 70s along the coast.

Temperatures change from warm to hot on Sunday. High temperatures will reach the low 90s for parts of the state. This will kickoff the first day of our forecasted heat wave. (A heat wave is when there are three or move days with high temperatures at or above 90 degrees).

Take a look at high temperatures Sunday afternoon. Some towns will expereince highs into the middle 90s. 

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The warm weather will stick around for the next several days. The temperature trend below shows 80 and 90 degree high temperatures through next Friday. Temperatures along the shoreline will run around 5 degrees cooler. 

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<![CDATA[From March-Like to August-Like]]> Tue, 06 Jun 2017 22:03:00 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/gfs_z500a_conus_1.png

A huge pattern change is coming in the next few days and we will see about as impressive of a weather 180 as you'll ever get in New England. Today's high in Hartford was a miserable 53 degrees - making today's high the 4th coldest on record for June. 

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The hideous weather pattern that we've been locked into as been due to an anomalously deep trough and upper level low that has parked itself over the northeastern United States. Unusually cold temperatures in the airmass coupled with an onshore flow off the ocean spelled disaster.

Alas, the pattern is changing in a big way. We have the potential for a 4-day heat wave beginning Sunday as an unusually warm airmass rushes in. We go from a giant trough over the northeast to a giant ridge. At least right now the wind direction appears favorable for big warmth with a general west or northwest flow over New England.

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At this point we're forecasting two days in the 90s bookended by 85-90 degree heat but don't be surprised to see all these numbers go up. For the time being, even with exceptional levels of instability being modeled for Monday and Tuesday, the strong ridge of high pressure should keep us capped and hold thunderstorms at bay.


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<![CDATA[Get Ready for a Major Warm-Up]]> Wed, 07 Jun 2017 17:08:18 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/HIGH+TEMPERATURES+SUNDAY.png

Drier and milder air has worked into Connecticut and even warmer air will arrive by the weekend. In fact we're forecasting a heat wave to start on Sunday with temperatures into the 90s.

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Much warmer air works in for the weekend and especially by early next week.

We're forecasting high temperatures in the low to middle 80s for Saturday and upper 80s to near 90 by Sunday.

Temperatures will climb into the low 90s early next week. 

Take a look at the temperature trend over the next seven days. Temperatures along the shoreline will run around 5 to 8 degrees cooler.

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<![CDATA[Temperatures Well Below Normal Today]]> Tue, 06 Jun 2017 16:35:35 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Photo+Cover+FAFR.png

Unsettled weather will continue over the next couple of days with scattered rain showers and temperatures well below normal.

High temperatures are only expected to reach the low- to middle-50s today, with some towns in the northwest corner of the state struggling to get out of the 40s. 

Temperatures this time of year are supposed to be into the middle 70s. The average high temperature for the Hartford area is 77 degrees. This means that temperatures will be a good 20 degrees below normal.

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There is some light at the end of the tunnel. The extended forecast features much warmer temperatures. We're forecasting temperatures will reach the upper 70s and low 80s by the weekend. 


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<![CDATA[Overcast, Foggy Commute Today]]> Mon, 05 Jun 2017 12:28:13 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/RAINY-WEATHER-SUNDAY.jpg

An unsettled weather pattern took over Sunday, bringing with it rain and cooler temperatures that will stick around for several days.

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Expect dense fog and the possibility of spot showers for the Monday morning commute. Scattered showers will pop up throughout the day with heavier, steadier showers expected after the evening commute.

Temperatures will hover in the 50s and 60s.

The gloomy weather continues through Tuesday with unseasonably cool temperatures through Wednesday. A warm up comes toward the end of the week.

Get the latest forecast from the NBC Connecticut meteorologists anytime here.



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut]]>
<![CDATA[More on Wednesday's Tornado]]> Fri, 02 Jun 2017 21:54:47 -0400 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*130/Webp.net-gifmaker+%281%29.gif

Wednesday's tornado warning was the first here in Connecticut in quite some time. The storm didn't produce a tornado here but did just west of here in Dutchess County, New York. Yesterday I answered a bunch of questions on the severe event but today I wanted to take a closer look at how the tornado itself formed. 

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The storm produced golf ball size hail and an EF-1 tornado near Poughkeepsie. While the environment seemed fairly hostile to tornado development one managed to form anyway and radar reveals a few possible reasons why. One possible explanation is that the tornado touched down as the a line of thunderstorms moving in from the Catskills was merging with a storm out ahead of it.

Cell mergers are funny things. Sometimes as two storms interact they both manage to weaken. Other times the merger is constructive and the storm manages to increase in intensity. The Dutchess County storm was the latter. There is a marked increase in the intensity of the storm as the merger is underway. Just speculation here but the cell merger may have been able to trigger a tornado and here are possible reasons why.

  • There wasn't much low level wind shear out ahead of the line. There was deep layer shear (meaning the storms that were 40,000 feet tall were able to spin) but for tornadoes you really want strong wind shear in the lowest 10,000 feet of the atmosphere. Not all spin is created equal! As the storm interacted with the line merging from the northwest the low level wind shear may have been locally enhanced allowing a tornado to develop in an otherwise hostile environment.
  • The storm motion for a period of time was quite deviant to the right as the merger was underway and immediately after. This can also serve to increase storm relative helicity (storm relative wind shear).
  • The increase in low level shear happened in tandem with a sizable jump in the storm's updraft.

Let's dive into the radar data. The animation at the top of this post shows the storm merger occurring. Below is the radar from Long Island valid at 6:54 p.m. where you can see a sizable velocity couplet. We have a gate-to-gate shear (or delta V) of 61 knots which is higher than most tornadoes in the northeast (the median value is 45 knots). Additionally, you can see a high spectrum width (SW) overhead which indicates turbulent and chaotic flow. SW spiked at the time of the velocity couplet passing over the tornado touchdown location and immediately diminished after the tornado lifted.

[[426043543, C]]

The second radar grab is also around the time of tornado and it shows a spike in differential reflectivity (or ZDR) at 12,200 feet above the ground. This indicates that big liquid water drops were being lofted above the freezing level - and this occurs for only 1 scan - right during tornadogenesis. This ZDR column is a good proxy for the storm's strength and shows a notable brief jump in updraft strength.

[[426043513, C]]

It stands to reason that the cell merger increased low level shear AND the increase in the updraft strength that occured simultaneious was enough to result in tornadogenesis - with more efficient vortex stretching and tilting.

Even environments that wouldn't normally support a tornado can when there are complex storm interactions going on. Radar data, in retrospect, gave us a few clues as to what was going on with the storm. 



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