<![CDATA[NBC Connecticut - Connecticut Weather News and Coverage]]> Copyright 2015 http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/weather/stories http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC_Connecticut.png NBC Connecticut http://www.nbcconnecticut.com en-us Wed, 28 Jan 2015 09:14:28 -0500 Wed, 28 Jan 2015 09:14:28 -0500 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Today's Forecast]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 16:59:03 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/first+alert_weather+1200.jpg

  FIRST ALERT FORECAST

 

Tuesday night: Any snow ending, blowing and drifting of snow continuing, especially east of I-91. Windy and cold. Low temperature in the single digits and teens. N wind slowly diminishing.

Wednesday: Mixed clouds and some sun. Breezy and cold. High temperature in the 20s. N-NW wind 10-20 mph.

Thursday: Mostly sunny early, then increasing clouds, chance of snow late at night. High temperature near 32.

Friday: Morning snow, looks like a coating to 2". Windy. High temperature 30-35, falling.

Follow us on Twitter: @GarettArgianas @BradNBCCT @ryanhanrahan



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<![CDATA[Download the NBC Connecticut Weather App]]> Wed, 26 Nov 2014 06:58:58 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/NBCCTWEATHERAPP043013.jpg

 

The most accurate weather information in Connecticut is now available whenever and wherever you want it.

The NBC Connecticut weather app is available for download for iPhone, iPad and Android and it's free!

All you have to do is search NBC Connecticut or Connecticut weather in the App Store or in Google Play.

You can keep NBC Connecticut's powerful radar at your fingertips and even zoom in and out on your neighborhood.

Select to receive push notifications and you'll know when severe weather is moving your way.

Plus, the NBC Connecticut weather app provides hourly, daily and 10-day forecasts. You can even pinpoint your location via GPS for precise conditions near you.

Download and rate the NBC Connecticut Weather app today!

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<![CDATA[Shelters, Warming Centers Open]]> Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:16:13 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/snow-generic.jpg

As blizzard conditions arrive in Connecticut, some cities and towns around the state have opening up shelters and warming centers to help keep residents safe.

Fairfield: An emergency shelter at Fairfield Ludlowe High School opened at 6 p.m. Monday. Residents in need of shelter are urged to first call the Emergency Communication Center at 203-254-4800.

Greenwich: Eastern Middle School and the Bendheim Western Greenwich Civic Center are on standby on shelters and have generators available.

Hamden: Warming centers are available Monday and Tuesday at all Hamden police and fire stations. The Miller Memorial Library and Hamden Senior Center at 2901 Dixwell Avenue, Whitneyville Branch Library at Carleton and Putnam avenues, Brundgage Community Branch Library at 92 Circular Avenue and Hamden Government Center at 2750 Dixwell Avenue will be open Monday.

Middletown: South Church will serve as a warming center from 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26 through 6 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28.

New London: The city has set up an emergency shelter at the Martin Center, which opened at 4 p.m. Monday.

Newington: In the event of widespread power outages, Newington High School will serve as as a shelter.

Norwich: The Emergency Operations Center closed at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, as did the emergency shelter at Kelly Middle School on Mahan Drive.

Simsbury: The Simsbury Public Library at 725 Hopmeadow Street will be open as a warming center from 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28 and Thursday, Jan. 29 and Friday 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 30. Eno Memorial Hall, where the senior center is located at 754 Hopmeadow Street, will also be open as a warming center 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday and 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday. Call the Simsbury Social Services Department at 860-658-3283 for more information.

Stamford: All fire stations and the Stamford Government Center are available as warming centers throughout the blizzard.

Trumbull: The Trumbull Senior Center will close as a shelter effective 11 a.m. on Tuesday, but will remain open until 5 p.m. as a warming center.

Wethersfield: No shelters are currently available, but Pitkin Community Center at 30 Greenfield Street will open in the event of widespread power outages.

Other municipalities have said shelters and warming centers will open up as needed. Anyone in need of shelter is urged to call 211.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Schools Delayed or Closed as State Digs Out]]> Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:53:55 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/New+London+public+schools+1200.jpg

Connecticut residents continue to dig out after the Blizzard of 2015 dumped up to 33 inches of snow on the state and hundreds of schools are either closed for the day or opening late.

Students at the University of Connecticut campuses in Storrs and Avery Point will return to class today, beginning at 10 a.m., while all other UConn campuses will operate on normal class schedules.

Eastern Connecticut took the brunt of the storm, with the highest snow totals recorded along the shoreline and Rhode Island border in New London and Windham counties.

The highest snow totals of the state were recorded in Thompson, which received 33.5 inches, according to the National Weather Service. Putnam, Moosup, East Killingly, Lisbon, Colchester, Norwich, Groton all received more than 2 feet of snow.

Many parts of western Connecticut, on the other hand, saw single-digit accumulations, as the heaviest band of snow veered east. More information on snow totals is available here.

While flurries will slowly taper off, the cold will linger, with temperatures dipping down into the single digits on Wednesday.

While several schools are closed for the day, this is the first day back to work for many after Gov. Dannel Malloy lifted a statewide travel ban at 2 p.m. Tuesday.

More than 600 state Department of Transportation crews and the state's fleet of 15 super snow blowers have been working around the clock to clear roads since Monday, but the governor urged caution on the roads because of any lingering snow or ice.

While the highways and many of the Malloy also asked residents to help clear fire hydrants and storm drains and make sure snow is not blocking vents for heating and hot water systems.

While residents of many towns are able to get around, the Connecticut National Guard has been deployed to Stonington, one of the hardest-hit areas of the state, and Bridgeport is sending four snow trucks to New London to help the city dig out.

The next chance of snow is during the morning commute on Friday



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<![CDATA[Seawall Collapses, Roads Closed Due to Flooding]]> Wed, 28 Jan 2015 00:24:19 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/marshfield.jpg

Significant flooding and at major seawall breaches were reported across several coastal Massachusetts communities Tuesday, as a crippling snowstorm continues to slam the region. 

Police in Marshfield, one of numerous Massachusetts communities dealing with flooding, confirmed that a major seawall breach from high tides in the morning and evening, which caused structural damage to homes, with several being condemned.

The entire island of Nantucket is without power as the flood waters rise.

One resident said the flooding in Marshfield is the worst he's seen in the 15 years he's lived there. The breach was reported on Bay Avenue. 

 

In Nantucket, the National Grid said high winds are causing a major issue, as is the salt spray.

"It's normal for them to have flooding during a Nor'easter but it's not usually this bad," Dave Fronzuto, of Nantucket Emergency Management, told NBC News. "The long duration of the storm is what's really hurting them."

Fire crews were reportedly trying to rescue one resident whose home was surrounded by water and downed power lines.

There are preliminary reports that a portion of the seawall at Hummarock Island in Scituate has collapsed as well.

On Martha's Vineyard, Oak Bluffs, Beach Road at Heart Haven is closed to Edgartown due to high winds and flooding. In Vineyard Haven, State Road in both directions is closed due to high winds and ocean splash over.

Massachusetts State Police said Quincy Shore Drive inbound between Furnace Brook and Fenno Street in Quincy is closed because of flooding, as is Morrissey Boulevard both ways between Freeport Street and UMass-Boston.

There were also reports of flooding in Newburyport.



Photo Credit: Marshfield Police
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<![CDATA[Babies Arrive Early During Blizzard of 2015]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 21:02:27 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/blizzard+baby+2+edit.jpg

Whether because of changing pressure or the stress associated with an impending storm, more pregnant mothers tend to give birth during severe weather events, and the Blizzard of 2015 was no exception.

“Typically, we do about 10 deliveries a day here at Hartford Hospital,” explained Elizabeth Deckers, medical director of Labor and Delivery at Hartford Hospital. “Yesterday, we did 15, with 11 of them being between the hours of 5 p.m. and 7 a.m.”

Those hours more or less coincided with the heaviest period of snowfall, which was most intense overnight Monday into Tuesday. Hospital employees stayed overnight at Hartford facilities and maternity wards were fully staffed.

A spokesperson for Hartford Hospital said natural births aren't the only deliveries to increase in frequency during adverse conditions.

“We contacted two families who were scheduled to deliver today, one by Caesarian and one by induction of labor, and asked them to come in a day early,” said Amy Schroder, manager of Labor and Delivery at Hartford Hospital.

One of those early deliveries – baby Emanuel Elijah Soloman – came into the world at 1 p.m. Tuesday, and his grandmother said she's just happy everyone is safe and healthy.

“I’m glad it’s over because I was concerned that she was going to go into labor during the storm because she was having contractions prior to coming to the hospital,” explained Dahlia Williams, of East Hartford.

Another pregnant mom from Farmington spent 45 minutes in the car navigating whiteout conditions but managed to safely deliver her baby at the Hospital of Central Connecticut in New Britain.

"We actually prayed that we would know for sure, like, having a sign – are we supposed to go out in this weather? – and my water broke, so we figured it was time," said Sarah Browning, who gave birth to baby Graham two-and-a-half weeks early.

Browning said her husband, a pastor at the New Hope Baptist Church in Torrington, called 911 to ask if it was safe to drive to the hospital. Emergency dispatchers advised them to try making the trip and call back if they got stuck.

The Brownings made it to the hospital around 2:30 a.m. Tuesday. Baby Graham was born about seven hours later, at 8:50 a.m. He weighs 5 pounds, 11 ounces.

"He's a little bugger and I can't believe he did this to us," Browning said with a laugh.

A total of 14 babies were delivered during the storm at St. Francis Hospital, compared with nine on an average day.

All moms and babies are doing well.



Photo Credit: Hartford Hospital]]>
<![CDATA[Flights Begin to Land at Bradley Airport]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:41:52 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/bradley+airport+ARRIVALS.jpg

Bradley International Airport closed to air traffic at 7 p.m. Monday due to rapidly deteriorating weather conditions, and airport officials said no outgoing flights will take off until at least Wednesday.

Most airlines began canceling flights Monday evening. Although outbound flights remain at a standstill, Bradley Airport began accepting arrivals Tuesday evening.

"We're anticipating five Delta arrivals coming in from Atlanta, Detroit and Minneapolis," explained airport Executive Director Kevin Dillon.

It could take a day or two for the airport to resume normal operations since departures can't leave until after arrivals land, and most won't come in until the morning.

"Those arrivals typically start around 7 or 8 in the morning, so any departures prior to that are most likely going to be canceled," Dillon said.

Check with your airline for the latest information on your flight status.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[National Guard Continues Post-Blizzard Aid]]> Wed, 28 Jan 2015 06:17:46 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/National+Guard+Stonington+Edited.jpg

While it's back to business at usual in some parts of the state Wednesday, 10 Connecticut National Guardsmen remain in Stonington, where it could take days to dig out after blizzard dropped 20 inches of snow in the town.

Schools are also canceled again in Stonington and hundreds of schools statewide have either closings or delays.

The National Guard was deployed on Tuesday to move snow from the shoreline streets of Stonington, one of the hardest-hit areas of the state where snowfall lingered Tuesday night.

Capt. Michael Petersen of the U.S. Army National Guard said soldiers brought in engineer equipment, including bucket loaders, to move mounds of snow 8-10 feet high.

The guardsmen were dispatched after town equipment broke down Tuesday in the middle of the job, while some streets remained impassible.

Stonington First Selectman George Crouse said he expected cleanup to last up to 20 hours after the Blizzard of 2015 moved out, leaving behind up to 2 feet of snow and heavy financial implications in its wake. Some parts of eastern Connecticut had as much as 30 inches of snow.

"This is not a normal snow," Crouse said. "We are eating up almost our entire budget."

But even after the National Guard helps with the heavy lifting, financial constraints will still pose a problem. Crouse said he hopes the town can qualify for funding through FEMA.

"I've lived on the shoreline since I was 6 and I do not remember a storm of this magnitude," said Stonington resident Martha Slater.

Stonington isn't the only shoreline community getting some help. Four plow trucks from Bridgeport were sent to New London to help clear clogged-up streets.

"It's nice that they could come lend a hand from elsewhere," said New London resident Alex Schroeder. "We all should do the same, lend a hand, get it done faster."



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Bridgeport Residents Asked to Move Cars By 11 a.m. ]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 10:27:25 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Bridgeport+police+generic.jpg

The travel ban has been lifted for local roads in Fairfield and Litchfield counties, but officials in Bridgeport said the parking ban remains in effect and Mayor Bill Finch is asking residents to move their vehicles to the odd-numbered side of the road by 11 a.m. on Tuesday.

He is asking residents to move their cars to allow public works crews to clear the roads.

Parking is still not permitted on snow emergency roads.

“Thank you to the residents for their cooperation with adhering to the Snow Emergency and to the hard working public works crew for their efforts in keeping our roads safe for the kids and families of Bridgeport," Mayor Finch said in a statement.


 



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Residents Urged to Stay Off Roads]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:52:52 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/snow+plows+in+new+haven+1200.jpg

Snow continues to fall and residents of several communities are urged to stay off the roads while crews continue to clear streets.

New London Mayor Daryl Justin Finizio said city crews have been making good progress in responding to storm, but motorists are going out on the roads, getting stuck and making it more difficult for them to do their jobs.

New London city officials are urging residents to shelter in place and stay off the roads.

“By being on the roads you only risk your own safety and slow the City’s response to the storm,” Mayor Finizio said in a statement. “Please continue to follow all instructions disseminated by emergency management personnel.”

East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo Jr. is also urging residents to stay off the roads so road crews can continue clearing.

“I continue to ask residents to exercise patience with respect to the clearing of streets. According to our Public Works Department it will take a minimum of eight (8) hours to clear our streets after the snow has finally ended. Once again the heaving, blowing, and drifting of snow that will continue could extend that time frame,” Maturo said in a statement. “During the “curb to curb” cleanup, it will be impossible for our crews to keep snow out of your driveway aprons. Since no travel is permitted today I might suggest your delaying that part of your cleanup until our crews are finished with your street.”

In Norwich, however, all main roads are passable and improving. Clearing on secondary roads and parking lots will be completed this evening. City officials said the citywide snow emergency will be lifted as of 5 a.m. on Norwalk.

Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra urged residents on Tuesday morning to stay off the roads for a little longer as cleanup continues.

The First Selectman of East Lyme said road are expected to be impassable through today and into tomorrow and suggested people stay off roads. Officials also urge businesses not to reopen until tomorrow to keep staff and customers safe.

Gov. Dannel Malloy said the travel ban has been lifted, but police in Greenwich and Darien are still asking residents to stay off local roads.


 



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[New Britain Does Things Differently This Time Around Than 2013 Blizzard]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:52:34 -0500

After residents were left stranded in the February blizzard of 2013 in New Britain when many streets went unplowed for days, the city of New Britain is doing things differently this time around.

New Britain Mayor Erin Stewart pened the city's emergency operations center. While blizzard conditions continue outside, her office reported that crews are working to keep the roads open.

Stewart, who was a New Britain resident during the 2013 blizzard but not mayor, spent Monday reviewing the forecast and planing for the storm with public works and emergency services officials.

Back in 2013 when Tim O'Brien was mayer, the city ordered an independent review of its emergency procedures. The study called New Britain "a city potentially put at risk" and made several recommendation to improve emergency operations, including updating an outdated radio system. O'Brien said at the time that the city also identified many of the recommendations made in the study in its own internal review and that the radio system upgrade was in the works before the blizzard hit that year.

As for now, Stewart said that "government is most effective when everyone is communicating and sharing information."

 "I know what it was like to be stranded at my house for almost a week on end," said Stewart, referencing the 2013 blizzard, adding that New Britain has "made some serious changes to its entire operation since then, including developing new snow routes and getting new equipment. "Our staff is properly prepared to get our streets dug out, get those emergency routes opened up, get our people safe and out and about their business."

The city established a committee to self-evaluate its operations and took the suggestions, "so we're pretty good to go right now," Stewart said Tuesday morning.

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<![CDATA[Snowfall Totals Across Connecticut ]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 22:59:58 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/amston+snowfall.jpg

The Blizzard of 2015 is winding down and has dumped up to 30 inches of snow across some parts of the state.

Northeastern and Central Connecticut

Much of the state's interior has received between 10 and 15 inches of snow, but a band of heavy precipitation dropped up to 30 inches along the eastern border in towns such as Thompson and Moosup. Check the full list of snow totals for Hartford, Tolland and Windham counties.

Southeastern and Southwestern Connecticut

The disparity between the eastern and western parts of the shoreline is significant. Most of Fairfield County has received less than a foot of snow, while parts of Middlesex County have received up to 22 inches and areas of New London County have received 24.5 inches. Check the list of snow totals for Fairfield, Middlesex, New Haven and New London counties.

Western Connecticut

The brunt of the storm dodged Litchfield County, which has received between 3.6 and 9 inches of snow, according tothe National Weather Service. Check the full list here.



Photo Credit: Randy Anagnostis
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<![CDATA[Your Blizzard Photos]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 21:55:53 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/161*120/c9bc7391dba140a8b54c06dd6e31b1be.jpg Photos from the Blizzard of 2015, Jan. 26-27, 2015.

Photo Credit: Robin McWilliams]]>
<![CDATA[Parking Bans Being Lifted]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:17:17 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/hartford_blizzard.jpg

The worst of the storm is moving out, and the governor has lifted a statewide travel ban that took effect at 9 p.m. Monday. While some parking bans remain in effect as cities and towns dig out, others are being lifted.

Here's the latest:

Bloomfield: starting Monday, Jan. 26 at 2 p.m. and lasting through 9 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 29.

Bristol: starting Monday, Jan. 26 at noon.

Bridgeport: parking is prohibited on snow emergency routes and alternate-side-of-the-street parking is required on secondary roads. Snow emergency streets are listed online.

Canton: overnight parking is prohibited on all city streets as of 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26.

Cheshire: parking ban effective immediately through Wednesday. Jan. 28 at noon.

Durham: routine winter parking ban is in effect from Nov. 1 through April 1. Parking on all town streets and highways is prohibited during snow emergencies.

Hamden: parking ban effective 8 a.m. Monday, Jan. 26 until further notice.

Hartford: parking ban began at 3 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 26 and will be lifted at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27.

East Hartford: parking ban took effect Monday, Jan. 26 at 6 a.m. and will remain in effect until 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28 or until further notice.

East Haven: local state of emergency was lifted at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27 and the parking ban remains in effect through Wednesday, Jan. 28.

Farmington: parking ban in effect through 2 p.m. Jan. 29.

Greenwich: cars must be moved from snow emergency routes. Off-street parking is available at municipal lots, with the exception of the Greenwich Town Hall garage and the Greenwich Library lot.

Manchester: a town-wide parking ban is in effect until further notice.

Middletown: parking is prohibited on all city streets effective immediately. All city parking lots are available for off-street parking throughout the storm.

Milford: parking is banned on the even-numbered sides of city streets Monday until 8 a.m. Tuesday, then on the odd-numbered sides of the streets from 8 a.m. Tuesday until 5 p.m. on Wednesday.

New Britain: lifted at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 27.

New Haven: parking ban took effect at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 26 and will be partially lifted at 6 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28. The downtown ban (including Howe Street, MLK Boulevard, State Street and Grove Street) will be lifted but the ban along snow emergency routes and on even-numbered sides of neighborhood streets will remain in effect until noon, Jan. 29.

New London: downtown parking ban and citywide parking restrictions will remain in effect until at least noon Wednesday, Jan. 28. Residents are required to park on the even-numbered sides of city streets.

New Milford: parking ban lifted at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27. More information is available online.

Newington: has a regular winter parking ban from Nov. 1 to March 30. More information is available online. Town Hall, the library, Senior Center and other municipal facilities will remain closed on Tuesday, but town facilities are expected to open on a regular schedule on Wednesday. 

North Haven: lasting noon Monday, Jan. 26, 2015 until midnight Thursday, Jan. 28.

Norwalk: cars must be moved from snow emergency routes. Avoid parking on city streets. Residents can park at the Yankee Doodle and Maritime garages free of charge. More information is available online. Residents are also asked to help keep fire hydrants clear.

Norwich: parking ban will remain in effect until further notice. The latest estimate for public works to have two passable lanes for traffic is 6 p.m. on Tuesday. The city will continue to allow free parking, with no time restrictions, at city-owned parking lots at the Main Street garage and in the Intermodal Transportation Center on Falls Avenue. NPW will begin removal of snow moved to the side of the road in downtown Norwich at 6 a.m. on Wednesday and at 8 a.m. in Taftville and Greeneville. Parking is prohibited on odd-numbered sides of all city streets. Violators are subject to a $25 fine.

Plainfield: starting Monday, Jan. 26 at noon.

Rocky Hill: a parking ban is in effect from noon Monday, Jan. 26 through noon Wednesday, Jan. 28.

Simsbury: townwide parking ban has been lifted as of 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27.

Shelton: alternate-side-of-the-street parking is required Tuesday, Jan. 27.

Southington: a town-wide parking ban was implemented at 3 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26. Residents are asked to avoid parking on all town streets until further notice.

Stafford: townwide parking ban is in effect through 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28. Vehicles must be moved off all town streets.

Stamford: cars must be moved from snow emergency routes by 6 p.m. Monday. Free parking is available to residents at city garages.

Stratford: alternate-side-of-the-street parking is required throughout the storm. Residents can park at DeLuca Field, Franklin School and Honeyspot School until 24 hours after the storm ends.

Trumbull: parking ban effective immediately.

Wallingford: cars must be moved from all city streets starting at 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26.

Waterbury: parking ban took effect Monday, Jan. 26 at noon. Parking is prohibited in all posted snow zones and on the odd-numbered sides of all city streets.

West Hartford: town-wide parking ban lifted at 6 p.m. on Tuesday.

West Haven: On-street parking is banned from 4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26 until 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28.

Westport: on-street parking is prohibited on all town roads. Updates are available online.

Wethersfield: effective 4 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 26.

Willimantic: parking ban is in effect until 5 p.m. Wednesday. Cars must be moved from city streets.

Wolcott: parking ban effective immediately.

Vernon: effective 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26 until 8 a.m. Saturday Jan. 31.

More information on closings, cancellations and parking bans is available here. You can also check with you town for more information.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[State Offers Snow Removal Tips]]> Mon, 26 Jan 2015 15:23:26 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/snow-generic-ny-2.jpg

As a blizzard threatens to drop up to 30 inches of snow across the state, the Connecticut Department of Public Health is offering snow removal tips to help residents stay safe while cleaning up after the storm.

Snow Shoveling

You can hurt yourself while shoveling snow if you're not careful. To protect your back, bend at your knees and keep the shovel close to your body. Avoid twisting your torso and instead re-position your feet before you dump out snow from your shovel.

Use a small-bladed shovel and scoop small amounts at once, especially when snow is heavy and wet.

Make sure to drink plenty of water while shoveling to avoid getting dehydrated.

Shoveling can raise your heart rate and blood pressure, so make sure to start slow and get your body ready by stretching out.

Try to time your shoveling around the warmest part of the day.

Snow Blowing/Throwing

Avoid wearing scarves or other loose clothing that could potentially get caught in the machine's moving parts.

When moving equipment, move carefully and avoid twisting to keep from slipping or hurting your back.

Never place hands, feet or other body parts inside the machine while the engine is running.

If the machine becomes clogged, cut the engine and use a cleaning tool to unclog it. Never use your hands or feet to clean out clogged equipment.

Wait for machines with gas model engines to cool down before refueling.

Do not run a gas-powered snow blower/throwing in an enclosed area such as a garage or shed. This could put you at risk for carbon monoxide poisoning.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Association Advises Truckers to Sit Out the Storm]]> Mon, 26 Jan 2015 14:42:20 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Tow-Truck-generic.jpg

A statewide travel ban goes into effect at 9 p.m. on Monday and the Motor Transport Association of Connecticut said it has advised the 800 trucking companies it works with to bring their vehicles home and anticipate parking them through Tuesday.

“We strongly urge all of our members to spread the word to others that this is a hard ban designed to permit the state to deal with what may be a 4 inch per hour snow fall. This is a serious storm and it should be handled as such,” Mike Riley, president of the statewide trade association of the trucking industry, said in a statement.

Riley said the advanced notice on the travel ban gave drivers enough time to make Monday’s deliveries and cope with the logistical problems.

The organization has also advised members to fuel up and park their vehicles until the ban is lifted.

Areas have been arranged for drivers to park, according to the trucking association. In the past, truckers from outside the state had a difficult time finding safe places to shelter during inclement weather in Connecticut, Riley said.

“We are very pleased that the Connecticut Department of Transportation and the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection have arranged to open the parking areas in both Hammonasset State Park in Madison and Sherwood Island State Park in Westport as Truck Refuge Areas, to allow out of state truckers to wait out the storm,” Riley said.
 

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<![CDATA[New Haven Parking Ban, Snow Ordinances in Effect]]> Mon, 26 Jan 2015 15:08:28 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/PoliceSafetyPic00000000.jpg

As the blizzard approaches, New Haven police remind residents of parking restrictions and snow removal requirements.

The parking ban takes effect at 6 p.m. Monday and will end at 2 p.m. Thursday.

Parking will be barred on all snow routes during snow emergencies like this and otherwise parking is only allowed on sides of the street with even addresses. On-street barking is banned downtown and residents are required to park on even-numbered sides of the street in neighborhoods.

Property owners will be responsible for clearing snow and ice from sidewalks or footpaths pedestrians can access.

The town forbids people from moving snow or ice onto the street from private properties, sidewalks or gutters, police said. Violators face a $250 fine per violation.

Residents can park for free at all public school lots, as well as at the Granite Square Garage on State Street starting at 5 p.m. Parking is also available at the Temple Street Garage for $3 per car starting at 5 p.m. Monday.

For New Haven storm updates, residents can sign up for the city's emergency alerts or visit the city's website.

More information about parking is available online and on the Park New Haven Facebook and Twitter pages.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Preparing for Blizzard 2015]]> Mon, 26 Jan 2015 13:41:06 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/Price+Chopper+bread+aisle.JPG Residents across Connecticut have stocked up on bread in water in advance of the storm, which is expected to build up in intensity starting late Monday night.

Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Blizzard Buries Parts of Connecticut]]> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:50:40 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/stonington+cars+buried.JPG

As the Blizzard of 2015 began to dwindle Tuesday evening, Connecticut residents turned their attention to digging out from under as much as 33 inches of snow blanketing parts of the state.

Eastern Connecticut took the brunt of the storm, with the highest snow totals recorded along the shoreline and Rhode Island border in New London and Windham counties.

The highest snow totals of the state have been recorded in Thompson, which received 33.5 inches, according to the National Weather Service. Putnam, Moosup, East Killingly, Lisbon, Colchester, Norwich, Groton all received more than 2 feet of snow.

Many parts of western Connecticut, on the other hand, saw single-digit accumulations, as the heaviest band of snow veered east. More information on snow totals is available here.

Flakes are still falling in some areas of Connecticut but the storm is expected to move out by midnight. Winds will gust up to 35 mph, blowing fallen snow, but will lessen as the storm leaves the state.

While flurries will slowly taper off, the cold will linger, with temperatures dipping down into the single digits on Wednesday.

Blizzard warnings remain in effect through midnight Tuesday into Wednesday for New Haven, Middlesex and New London counties and through 1 a.m. Wednesday for Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland and Windham counties.

Driving Conditions

More than 600 state Department of Transportation crews and the state's fleet of 15 super snow blowers have been working around the clock to clear roads. Some 400 National Guardsmen were deployed when the storm hit Monday.

Gov. Dannel Malloy lifted a statewide travel ban at 2 p.m. Tuesday but urged drivers to take precautions and stay off the roads if possible.

"While the ban is lifted here in Connecticut, you should assume that this is a normal storm condition or snow condition, so we're not saying... that we want you to get on the roads," Malloy said. "On the other hand, we understand that people need to get to places and get to jobs and the like."

Malloy also asked residents to help clear fire hydrants and storm drains and make sure snow is not blocking vents for heating and hot water systems.

The Connecticut National Guard has been deployed to Stonington, one of the hardest-hit areas of the state.

Bridgeport is sending four snow trucks to New London to help the city dig out. The governor said state workers will help clear roads in eastern Connecticut towns, such as New London and Pomfret, after taking care of state roads.

"We will make resources available to them once we complete our road clearance of our obligated roads," Malloy said.

Fifteen crashes were reported while the travel ban was in effect. Malloy said halting travel during the height of the storm likely prevented hundreds of collisions.

"That is remarkable. Under slight storm conditions, we can expect upwards of several hundred accidents, so the system has worked because people of Connecticut have responded," Malloy said Tuesday afternoon.

AAA responded to 438 emergency calls between midnight at 9 a.m. Tuesday and 1,271 calls for help Monday, most of which were for towing, jump starting and lockouts, according to an agency spokesperson.

Some parking bans remain in effect as cities and towns around the state dig out.

Public Transportation

In addition to asking drivers to stay off the roads, mass transit was halted as the storm approached.

The Metro-North Hudson, New Haven and Harlem lines ran limited service on Tuesday, operating on a Sunday schedule. Weekday service will resume Wednesday and parking lots will be cleared for commuters, Malloy said.

Amtrak service is also starting back up Wednesday. Acela Express and Northeast Regional trains will fun from New York to Boston on a modified schedule. Trains will run on a regular schedule from New York to Washington, D.C.

The Springfield Shuttle from New Haven to Springfield will run on a reduced schedule.

Empire Service in New York, the Vermonter from Vermont to D.C., Lake Shore Limited from Chicago to New York and Boston, and Keystone Service from Pennsylvania to New York will operate on normal schedules.

Updates are available on the Amtrak website and Twitter account.

CT Transit bus service will also resume on Wednesday morning.

Norwalk Transit District services were also suspended on Tuesday, including the WHEELS local bus service, all evening shuttles, Coastal Link service from Norwalk to Milford, 7 Link service from Norwalk to Danbury, commuter shuttles from rail stations in Norwalk, Westport and Greenwich and all door-to-door services for the elderly and disabled. Service will resume at 6 a.m. on Wednesday.

Bradley International Airport shut down at 7 p.m. on Monday. Outbound flights are expected to resume Wednesday, but inbound flights began arriving Tuesday afternoon. Check with your air carrier for more information.

Snow Closings/Cancellations

The state was essentially paralyzed Tuesday, with hundreds of schools and businesses closed. Many plan to open late Wednesday morning or remain closed altogether as communities dig out. Check here for information on closings and delays.

The governor ordered all first, second and third shift non-essential state workers to stay home Tuesday but said a regular work schedule will be in place Wednesday.

Mail delivery was halted Tuesday in Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island and will resume Wednesday. Residents are asked to shovel walkways leading up to their mailboxes and make sure icy surfaces are sanded or salted. Enough snow must be cleared from the curb around the mailbox to allow delivery trucks to pull up alongside it.

All Access Health CT enrollment centers closed at noon Monday and will remain closed on Tuesday and Wednesday. All locations should reopen Thursday.

Hospitals have also made accommodations to provide care to patients throughout the storm, but have canceled elective procedures until the blizzard moves out.

The Department of Motor Vehicles canceled driver's license road and knowledge tests for Jan. 27 and 28. Applicants can reschedule their tests with the DMV.

Classes will resume at the University of Connecticut campuses in Storrs and Avery Point at 10 a.m. Wednesday. All other UConn campuses will operate on normal clas schedules.

Potential for Power Outages

The state's major utility companies characterized the blizzard as a Category 1 storm, meaning more than 100,000 customers could potentially lose power, according to the governor. Most outages were isolated and were quickly repaired.

The governor credited tree trimming programs and the lack of ice associated with this storm for the lack of major outages.

"I think we're learning and getting better at this stuff as we go along," Malloy said.

Before the blizzard hit, Connecticut Light & Power and United Illuminating requested out-of-state crews to assist in the event of outages. More than 500 CL&P workers have been at the ready and crews were brought into help from as far away as Canada.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[Bridgeport, Hartford Declare Snow Emergencies]]> Fri, 23 Jan 2015 19:28:13 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/231*120/Center+City+Snow+Umbrella+Snow+Generic.JPG

The city of Bridgeport has declared a snow emergency effective at 8 p.m. Friday ahead of tomorrow's storm, and a snow emergency in Hartford will take effect at the stroke of midnight.

A storm cell moving in from the southwest could drop up to 6 inches across much of the state.

Bridgeport

Residents are required to park on the even-numbered sides of city streets so plows can get by and clear the roads. Cars that do not comply with the parking requirements will be towed, according to the mayor's office.

To get their cars off the streets, residents can keep their cars at all Bridgeport public schools parking lots during the storm.

Parking along snow emergency routes is also prohibited. Snow emergency streets are marked with signs and are listed on the city's website.

Mayor Bill Finch said snow plows and salt-spreading trucks are at the ready and will be out in full force when the snow begins to fall.

Officials with the city's Department of Public Works are urging residents to shovel all walkways for safety purposes and avoid dumping snow from driveways and sidewalks back into the street.

Anyone with weather-related questions is urged to call the city's "BConnected" call center at 203-574-1311 or the Emergency Operations Center at 203-579-3829.

Hartford

The snow emergency in Hartford will take effect at 12:01 a.m. and will end at 11:59 p.m. Saturday, according to a news release from the mayor's office.

A parking ban has been issued, and residents are prohibited from parking along city streets. Cars that are not moved by midnight will be ticketed and towed.

Parking is available at all Hartford Public Schools starting at 3 p.m. Friday.

Residents can also park at the Morgan Street Garage, the lot at 2 Holcomb Street, the Keney Park Entrance Lot on Ridgefield Street, the KDA Center Lot on Naugatuck Street, the Pope Park Center Lot on Park Terrace, the Metzner Center Lot on Franklin Avenue, the Colt Park Lot on Wawarme Avenue and the Elizabeth Park lots.

The parking ban will be lifted on Sunday and Winterfest at Bushnell Park will remain open, according to the mayor's office.

Residents who need to get out of the cold can seek shelter by calling 211 or visiting the McKinney Shelter at 34 Huyshope Avenue, Immaculate Conception Shelter at 560 Park Street and South Park Inn at 75 Main Street.

More information on the city's parking ban is available online.



Photo Credit: NBC10.com
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<![CDATA[Snow Coming to an End, Icing Possible]]> Sat, 24 Jan 2015 20:10:28 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/12415+East+Hartford+Snow+Edited.jpg

A quick burst of snow dropped about 2 to 7 inches of snow in towns across Connecticut on Saturday morning and a blizzard could be on the way at the start of the week.

Bridgeport and Hartford declared snow emergencies. A number of municipalities, including Hartford, Newington, Plainville, Vernon, Manchester, East Windsor, Southington, Middletown, have issued parking bans due to the storm. Norwich banned parking on the side of city streets with odd number addresses. Check with your town for the latest update on parking bans in your area.

New Britain is lifting its parking ban at 5 p.m. on Saturday and Putnam's runs until 6 pm. New London ended its parking ban at 1:45 p.m. Bloomfield's parking ban runs until 9 p.m. on Saturday and Farmington's goes until midnight.

State police advised drivers to stay off the roads Saturday due to the snow. Conditions were slippery Saturday morning causing some problems as some drivers took to the snow-coated local roads and highways, like Interstate 84. NBC Connecticut saw one car in East Hartford fishtail while making a turn.

"The interstate is actually better than the local roads," Hartford resident Cory Walker said." The local roads seem a bit slippery."

Sunday will be dry, but more snow could move in on Monday. There could be another nor' easter  coming in on Monday night that will stay through Wednesday at day break.

Route 69 was closed for several hours after a fatal crash on the Woodbridge and Bethany line.

The weather prompted hundreds of closures and activity cancellations, including SAT testing at several schools. The Connecticut Science Center opened late due to the weather and the New England Air Museum in Windsor Locks closed for the day.

The northern edge of a nor' easter began to move into the state around 2 a.m., and put down snow quickly. 

Winter storm warnings were been issued for Hartford, Tolland, Windham and Litchfield counties, along with the northern parts of Fairfield and New Haven counties.

As temperatures drop into the 20s overnight, that could cause the ground to refreeze in the evening and overnight.

Willimantic police reported multiple spin-outs in the slippery conditions.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority advises travelers to leave additional time and to exercise caution boarding and exiting trains.

The Department of Motor Vehicles will be closed, and the Department of Transportation has also canceled all road tests scheduled for Saturday. Several towns have also enacted parking bans.

Depending on the storm track, we could also see periods of rain, damaging winds along the shoreline and minor to moderate coastal flooding. Broken branches could also bring down power lines, causing scattered outages, Field said.

Temperatures will hover around freezing, and snow will be heavy and wet.

Download the NBC Connecticut weather app to get the latest hour-by-hour forecast on the go, interactive radar, weather alerts and more.



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<![CDATA[Glaze of Ice Caused Hundreds of Crashes Statewide]]> Mon, 19 Jan 2015 09:00:48 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/11814+New+London+Crash+Edited.jpg

State police responded to 216 storm-related crashes on Sunday as ice covered roads across the state.

Cars littered the side of Interstate 95 Sunday morning as a glaze of ice made the road impassable. Traffic cameras showed hundreds of cars from Bridgeport to Greenwich stopped along with countless accidents.

Injuries were reported in 28 crashes.

The most serious was a crash in New Haven that killed an 88-year-old Woodbridge woman. The crash happened on North Frontage Road during icy conditions.

Six people were injured in a crash on Interstate 95 in New London. Multiple ambulances responded.

There was also a rollover crash in Bristol earlier in the day, as well as another on St. Charles Street in West Hartford at 4:15 p.m. The car landed in bushes alongside the road and the driver crash was hospitalized with minor injuries. Police believe that icy roads were a factor.

There were also 800 weather-related calls, including spin-outs, loss of control and disabled vehicles.

Route 202 was closed in New Milford at Upland Road as of 3:11 p.m. after a car crashed into a pole, the DOT reported at 12:07 p.m. The road could be closed for several hours.

Route 83 is closed at Lower Butcher Road in Ellington due to a one-vehicle crash reported to the state Department of Transportation at 3:12 a.m.

Interstate 91 south has reopened after closing earlier between exits 22N and 21 in Cromwell because of a multiple-vehicle accident reported to the state Department of Transportation at 9:18 a.m. I-91 northbound in Hartford was still listed as congested between exits 28 and 29 at 3:11 p.m. Sunday, the DOT reported on its website.

The westbound lanes of Interstate 84 in New Britain reopened after closing earlier near Route 372 between exits 35 and 33 because of an accident involving multiple vehicles.

Route 2 has reopened after closing in the westbound direction in Glastonbury between exits 10 and 8 earlier due to a one-vehicle crash reported to the DOT at 9:47 a.m.

Route 15 southbound has reopened between exits 36 and 35 due to a multiple-vehicle crash in Stamford reported to the DOT at 10:02 a.m.

Multiple organizations reported closings on Sunday and Weston Public Schools canceled any activities scheduled to be on campus Sunday due to icy road conditions. Click here for more closings and cancellations.

Rain and temperatures below freezing resulted in a quick accumulation of freezing rain in Fairfield County and that spread statewide, prompting officials statewide to advise residents to stay off the roads.

Freezing rain transitioned into rain for the remainder of the day as temperatures warmed above freezing.

The next time Connecticut might see snow is Wednesday with a possible cold storm system moving in from the north known as an "Alberta Clipper," NBC Connecticut meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan said.

Metro North also cautioned travelers to be careful when heading to the train stations, particularly when boarding or exiting trains on the platforms, and to allow for extra time.

You can get the latest weather news on the NBC Connecticut weather page or by downloading the First Alert weather app for your iPhone or Android device in the App Store or Google Play.



Photo Credit: New London Firefighters IAFF Local 1522]]>
<![CDATA[Warming Centers Open as Temperatures Drop]]> Fri, 16 Jan 2015 17:24:30 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/461047024.jpg

As snow squalls move out and bitter wind chills move in, the governor is activating the state's Severe Cold Weather Protocol and warming centers are opening up.

Bloomfield

  • The Alvin & Beatrice Wood Human Services Center at 330 Park Avenue will serve as a warming center Friday from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Monday from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Those in need of shelter are asked to use the community/youth center entrance on the west side of the building.
  • The Prosser Library at 1 Tunxis Avenue will be oipen from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. The town will provide water but guests are asked to bring their own food, medications, emergency contact numbers and any other necessary items.

Norwalk

  • The community room at the Norwalk Police Department at 1 Monroe Street will serve as a daytime warming shelter.
  • The Open Door Shelter at 4 Merritt Street will be open overnight.

Stamford

  • Domus/Chester Addison Community Center at 245 Selleck Street will be open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Stamford Family YMCA at 10 Bell Street will be open from Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Faith Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church at 29 Grove Street will be open Monday through Thursday from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Glenbrook Community Center at 35 Crescent Street will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • The first-floor lobby of the Government Center at 888 Washington Boulevard will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
  • The Jewish Community Center at 1035 Newfield Avenue will be open Monday through Thursday from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 5:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • The fire stations at 629 Main Street, 215 Washington Bouluevard, 80 Fairfield Avenue, 364 Shippan Avenue, 1600 Washington Boulevard, 8 Dorlen Road, 366 Long Ridge Road, 987 Hope Street atn 268 Turn of River Road will be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • An overnight warming center will be open to the homeless at 8 Woodland Place from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Malloy Activates Severe Cold Weather Protocol]]> Fri, 16 Jan 2015 21:30:54 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/TLMD-frio-en-nueva-york-st.jpg

A line of snow squalls ushered in a new round of arctic air on Friday, and Gov. Dannel Malloy has activated the state's Severe Cold Weather Protocol as a result.

Temperatures dipped down into the teens Friday evening and will continue to fall overnight, bottoming out between -5 and 5 degrees across the interior and 5 to 15 degrees along the shoreline.

Winds are expected to pick up, gusting over 30 miles per hour and dropping wind chills to near zero on Friday night.

Malloy said Friday afternoon that the state will deploy teams that specialize in working with the homeless to make sure they find safe and warm places to stay. Anyone in need of shelter is urged to call 211.

Warming centers have begun to open ahead of the temperature dip.

Saturday will be in the 20s with a lot of sun before rain moves in on Sunday and Sunday night. The rain may end as snow in parts of Connecticut on Monday morning.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Classes Canceled Over Weather Concerns]]> Mon, 12 Jan 2015 17:40:24 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/lyman+hall+high+school.jpg

Many schools around the state sat empty today as superintendents decided to cancel classes amid concerns over the weather.

Hartford, Wallingford, Cromwell and Wethersfield were just some of the districts around the state that canceled classes Monday, only to see above-freezing temperatures and rain falling rather than ice or snow.

"I think it was a good idea. It was icy. I'd rather them be safe than sorry," said Bonni Standiford, of Cromwell.

In Wallingford, classes were initially delayed and then canceled about an hour later.

"I found some slippery patches but I think they could have gone to school. A delay would have been fine," said Paige Ryan, of Wallingford.

Ryan wasn't the only one who thought the decision may have been preemptive.

"I understand part of it is for the safety. They're worried about school buses, they're worried about maybe people who have to walk to school, but why don't you wait and see?" said Wallingford resident Beth Naccarato.

While temperatures stayed warm enough to keep the rain from turning to ice, some say when it comes to canceling classes, it's better safe than sorry.

"I'd rather have them cut a day off vacation than risk my child's life in a bus," said Jay Nach, of Wallingford.

Both the Hartford and Wallingford school districts declined to comment on their decisions to close.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Wintry Mix Causes Slippery Roads, School Delays and Closings]]> Mon, 12 Jan 2015 15:36:57 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/11215snowmap.jpg

Hundreds of schools were delayed or closed across the state on Monday as a light wintry mix coated the roads and the state Department of Motor Vehicles has canceled road tests until 10 a.m. because driving conditions are expected to be slippery.

The winter weather advisory started around 3 a.m. on Monday and will last until about 4 p.m.

Is it snowing where you are? Send photos to seeitshareit@nbcconnecticut.com

In addition to the wintry mix, a 3.3 magnitude earthquake rattled eastern Connecticut, centered in the Moosup area of Plainfield just after 6:30 a.m. on Monday. 



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<![CDATA[Governor Extends Severe Weather Protocol Through Sunday]]> Fri, 09 Jan 2015 19:44:28 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/461168865.jpg

With chilly temperatures and below-zero wind chills in the forecast through the weekend, Gov. Dannel Malloy has extended the state's severe weather protocol through Sunday morning.

"We must continue to protect the most vulnerable members of our state's population during these severe cold weather outbreaks," Malloy said in a statement Friday. "I urge anyone in need of shelter to call 2-1-1 and continue to encourage local communities to consider opening warming centers or other facilities to help people in need."

The governor activated the state's severe weather protocol on Tuesday ahead of the coldest temperatures of the season thus far. Overnight Wednesday into Thursday, wind chills dipped down to almost -30 degrees in parts of the state.

The extreme cold prompted school delays across Connecticut, and

schools in Suffield were closed Thursday

after fuel froze and gelled up in the town's school bus fleet.

Some 100 cancellations and delays are in effect Friday after a morning storm blanketed the state with a couple inches of snow and road conditions quickly deteriorated.

By activating the severe weather protocol, the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, the Department of Social Services, the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Department of Housing are directed to coordinate with 211 and the state network of shelters.

This also activates the DESPP’s Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security WebEOC communications network, an online system that allows local, regional and state emergency management officials and first responders to share up-to-date information about a variety of situations and conditions, monitor capacity at shelters across the state and allow 211 to act as a clearinghouse to assist in finding shelter space for those who need it.



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<![CDATA[Snow Led to Messy Commute, School Closings]]> Fri, 09 Jan 2015 11:58:25 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Traffic+on+Route+9+Jan+9+1200.jpg

A band of heavy snow started coming through Connecticut just in time to cause problems during the morning commute and several schools either delayed the start of classes or decided not to open at all today.

The snow caused whiteout conditions in parts of the state, making traffic very slow on Interstates 84 and 91, as well as Routes 2 and 291.

The snow has started clearing in western Connecticut, but there are problems on the roads in NEW London County.

A car hit a police on Interstate 95 South near exit 86. There is also a a two-car crash in the area of exits 89 and 88.

There is also a two-car crash on Route 2 in North Stonington right off the I-95 exit 92 offramp. 

There is also a crash on on I-84 East in Union. Police said a car went into the woods near exit 73.

Earlier today, injuries were reported in a crash on Route 9 North in Cromwell at exit 19 and road conditions prompted the state Department of Motor Vehicles to cancel all road tests until 10 a.m.

This is the second day in a row that weather has affected schools. While schools were delayed on Thursday because of cold weather, several districts that planned to open late on Friday because of snow later decided not to open at all for the day.

As of 10 a.m. there were more than 170 closings and delays. Check the list here.

Crashes were also reported on Route 7 in Ridgefield, Route 8 in Waterbury, on Interstate 91 North in Middletown and the travel time from New Haven to the George Washington Bridge in New York was around five hours.

The afternoon will be sunny. Skies clear later, but cold temperatures will linger with highs in the low- to mid-20s on Saturday.

Is it snowing where you are? Send photos to us at shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.

If you do not get our school closing alerts, sign up here.  


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<![CDATA[Tips to Cope When It's Ridiculously Cold]]> Thu, 08 Jan 2015 14:42:01 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/shutterstock_162996170.jpg

Snow, high winds and freezing temperatures are expected to leave much of the Eastern United States shivering this week.

Here's how you can minimize the misery:

1. Bundle Up (and Swap Out the Leggings)

It might seem obvious, but piling on a few extra layers is a great way to stay warm, especially if you have to be outside. Keeping your core warm is especially important when temperatures dip below freezing, so try wearing an extra shirt or two under your coat.

Worried about looking bulky? Many sporting goods companies make cold-weather gear that is slim enough to be worn even under work clothes.

For ladies who love wearing leggings, try swapping them out for long underwear. Several hiking-gear companies make long underwear that has the same look as leggings and will help keep you warm. A bonus: Most long underwear is meant to dry quickly, so leftover snow and slush won't leave your legs damp.

2. Indulge in Foods That Help You Keep Warm

You already know that eating well in the winter could help you stay healthy, but did you know it might help keep you warm, too? Eating extra, healthy fats during the winter can help rev up metabolism, which in turn heats the body, according to Columbia Health.

If your New Year's resolution was to drop a few pounds, don't worry -- you can always skip the extra fat and try eating warmer foods and drinks. Try soups, spicy foods, hot coffee and teas to reverse the chill!

3. We're Sorry: Alcohol Decreases Core Temperatures 

Although alcoholic beverages might make you feel warm, they actually decrease your core temperature and can be dangerous during winter months. 

According to The New York Times and a study by Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, alcohol reverses some reflexes that control body temperature, especially the body's ability to shiver. Alcohol can also make you sweat, even when it is cold, which can lower core temperatures even more. 

4. Keep Your Toes Toasty

Hypothermia is most likely to begin in extremities like your hands and feet, so keeping your toes warm is important. Whether you're walking to work or just around the block, make sure to wear sturdy, insulated shoes that will help prevent slips on slick surfaces and keep your feet dry.

Looking for a pair? Try a good pair of hiking books or, for the fashionista, this article from Glamour offers boots that are cozy and cute. Also, consider wearing an extra pair of socks (here's a helpful article to help you choose the right pair). 

5. Sunglasses... Even in the Winter

If you're walking in the snow during the day, wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from the glare.

If you are walking at night, make sure to dress in colors other than white and to wear something reflective on your person to alert drivers to your presence. 

Avoid walking too close to roadways, especially near icy areas where drivers may lose control of their vehicle. 

6. Remember the "Three-Feet Rule"

Space heaters are a great way to add extra heat to colder rooms, but always remember to keep anything flammable at least three feet away from the heater at all times.

Flammable items include clothing, rugs, bedding and curtains. Also remember to place the heater on a hard, non-flammable, stable surface and to turn it off completely before leaving the house. Set a reminder on your phone if you're afraid you'll forget.

7. Watch Out for Furry Friends

You might be jealous of your dog or cat's fur coat when temperatures drop, but they need to be kept warm, too. 

Catherine Blake, owner of Make My Day, Please dog walking services suggests dog walks should be limited to 10 minutes.

"You also have to be careful of ice in their paws because it can act like little daggers," Blake said.

Always remember to bring pets inside when temperatures begin to drop. If they can't come inside, provide enough bedding and insulated shelter for them to keep warm. If temperatures are below freezing, remember to check pets' water and replace it if it has frozen.

8. Monitor Fires

It's easy to snooze in front of a roaring fire, but always make sure that fireplace embers are completely out before going to bed for the night. 

Wood fireplaces should always have a glass or metal fire screen large enough to catch sparks and rolling logs. 

9. Don't Warm Up Your Car While It's Unattended

Although letting your car heat up before you hop in can be tempting, leaving your car running when you're not around offers the perfect opportunity for thieves to steal it. 

Instead, have a family member wait inside it while you finish getting ready, and then switch "shifts" with them when you have finished. Alternate who goes first to keep it fair.

10. Assemble a Car Emergency Kit

Check the CDC's car emergency checklist to ensure you are prepared in case you have a roadside emergency during inclement weather. 

11. Keep Heat Constant

Setting your thermostat at the same temperature day and night will help prevent your pipes from freezing and bursting. While avoiding a high heating bill might be tempting, you could be protecting yourself from costly repairs from frozen or burst pipes. 

If you are going to be away from home for an extended period of time, don't lower heat below 55 degrees. 

12. Protect Pipes

Keeping the heat on isn't the only thing you can do to protect pipes from freezing

State Farm suggests letting your hot and cold faucets drip overnight and opening cabinet doors to allow heat to get to uninsulated pipes under sinks and on exterior walls.

Locate the water shut-off valve in your home in advance of a water emergency, so you know where to go if a pipe bursts, one local water agency spokesperson advises.

13. Watch Out for Antifreeze

People often use antifreeze on sidewalks and paths to melt ice and snow, but the dangers to humans and pets if it is ingested are serious. 

Know the symptoms of antifreeze poisoning in humans and monitor children who are behaving oddly after returning from playing outside. 

Wipe down pets' paws, stomachs and tails when they come inside so they do not ingest antifreeze when licking themselves. Check symptoms of antifreeze poisoning in animals to ensure you are prepared in case they become sick.

14. Know the Terms

Familiarize yourself with government terms for winter weather emergencies

  • Freezing Rain - Rain that freezes when it hits the ground, creating a coating of ice on roads, walkways, trees and power lines.
  • Sleet - Rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground. Sleet also causes moisture on roads to freeze and become slippery.
  • Winter Weather Advisory - Winter weather conditions are expected to cause significant inconveniences and may be hazardous. When caution is used, these situations should not be life threatening.
  • Winter Storm Watch - A winter storm is possible in your area. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for more information.
  • Winter Storm Warning - A winter storm is occurring or will soon occur in your area.
  • Blizzard Warning - Sustained winds or frequent gusts to 35 miles per hour or greater and considerable amounts of falling or blowing snow (reducing visibility to less than a quarter mile) are expected to prevail for a period of three hours or longer.
  • Frost/Freeze Warning - Below freezing temperatures are expected.

15. Make Sure Roads Are Safe Before Driving

Online snow plow trackers make it easy to check when roads in your area are clear and safe to drive after snowfall. 

16. Write Down Important Utility Numbers

Heavy snow and ice can settle on power lines and cause power outages. Write down utility numbers and have them handy during a storm in case you need to report an outage or incident.

17. Watch for Signs of Hypothermia 

Prolonged exposure to cold temperatures can result in hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature. A body temperature that's too low can affect the brain, which makes hypothermia particularly dangerous because the victim may not know it is happening. 

Hypothermia is most likely at very cold temperatures, but it can occur even at merely cool temperatures (above 40°F) if a person becomes chilled from rain, sweat or submersion in cold water.

Check the CDC's guide for recognizing hypothermia to prepare yourself to help someone suffering from the condition. 

18. Help the Homeless

Be on the lookout for homeless people who could get hypothermia as temperatures dip into the teens overnight. If you see someone  who needs shelter or warmer clothing, call your local shelter hot line or authorities.

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<![CDATA[More Cold Means More Snow at Woodbury Ski Area]]> Wed, 07 Jan 2015 18:55:15 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/6pslopesstill010715doug00000000.jpg

With school in session and temperatures plummeting, it was a quiet afternoon at Woodbury Ski Area – but workers were very much in business making ice-free snow.

“You've got to love it; you can't beat it,” said the manager, Scott D’Amato. “Everything's freezing, no runoff, and the colder it is, it piles up faster.”

Although D'Amato's enthusiam was evident, he admitted the bitter cold keeps people away. Regardless, the cold snap could last long enough to coat the slopes with a base ready for the weekends.

“The colder it is, the more you can make. Get it going; this is it! It's great!” he said, gesturing toward a mound of snow produced Tuesday night.

Had temperatures been in the 20s, the pile would have been just 25 percent of what it is, D'Amato said, and it’s still growing.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Schools Gear Up for Frigid Temps]]> Wed, 07 Jan 2015 18:24:18 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/schools+cold+buses.jpg

Schools around the state are making every effort to keep students and staff members safe and warm and ensure that things go smoothly as temperatures dip into the single digits overnight and wind chills fall below zero.

East Haven superintendent Dr. Portia Bonner checked off items on a long to-do list at the high school Wednesday to ensure the town's schools will stand up to the brutal cold.

“In most cases, we do have more than one boiler in our old buildings, so if one goes down, we can also prevent any kind of cold temperatures from going on, but the key is to make sure those boilers are running overnight, so there's no freezing,” said Bonner.

She also put calls into the bus company and kept an eye on the forecast to determine whether to implement a delay Thursday morning. Bonner ultimately decided that, barring any emergencies, school will start on time, but said she wants to educate parents on the dangers the extreme cold poses to students.

“The waiting for the buses, making sure that the children are properly covered, so there are no skin areas exposed to the cold, cold temperatures, making sure there's hats and hoods and so on,” she explained.

School officials in New Haven are following suit.

Transportation Coordinator Teddi Barra said buses will start their engines around 3 a.m. to allow them ample time to warm up before students climb aboard.

Barra's office focuses on timely arrivals so that students, who may not be dressed properly, aren't waiting in cold conditions for long periods of time.

Meanwhile, the principal at Carrigan Intermediate School in West Haven plans to open the building early for students, who arrive early and would otherwise be waiting outside in the cold.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Shoreline Residents Prep for Bitter Cold]]> Wed, 07 Jan 2015 18:19:48 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/new+haven+ice+skating.JPG

The temperature in East Haven read 27 degrees Wednesday afternoon and it's only getting colder.

Shoreline residents are getting ready for what's head.

"It's time for us to get some bad weather, you know. Sneaking up on us right now. We just have to wait and see what happens," said Ronald Pernell, of West Haven.

Temperatures are expected to plummet overnight, and icy gusts will bring the wind chill down below zero. Those who live in the New Haven area said they were prepared for frigid temps to set in eventually.

"We've been lucky so far. We've gotten spoiled a little bit, you know, but it's January, and you have to expect it to get cold, and just got to do things in the cold," said West Haven resident Mark Levine, who joined a dozen others to skate on the ice in New Haven on Wednesday.

The ice skaters made sure to bundle up and took fireplace breaks every so often to stay warm.

"We're going through a lot of firewood; we have a fire every day. I cook a lot of hot soups," explained Wallingford resident Jenn Pappas, who brought her daughter out to skate. "We stay inside a lot, but coming out to go ice skating is a nice afternoon."



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com]]>
<![CDATA[Police Seek Out Hartford's Homeless as Bitter Cold Arrives]]> Tue, 06 Jan 2015 22:46:58 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/hartford+cold+weather.jpg

As bitter cold descends around the state, police officers in Hartford are searching the city for those in need of a warm place to stay.

"We've got to look out for folks that may not necessarily be able to look out for themselves," explained Hartford police Sgt. Jeffrey Morrison.

Police patrolling the city are taking a closer look at the side streets and alleyways of Hartford, keeping an eye out for some of the city's most vulnerable.

Scanning under bridges and places that help deflect the wind, Morrison found blankets and sleeping bags but no one settling down for the night. The frigid weather can be a dangerous time for the homeless, so police want to make sure they have somewhere to go.

"Hypothermia can set in very quickly, especially if you're not properly layered up, if you don't have the proper clothing, you don't have the proper shelter," Morrison said.

Even if Hartford shelters reach capacity, police will make sure to find the homeless someplace safe to weather the storm.

"Sometimes we have to go out of town. We have to bring them out to Manchester, East Hartford, New Britain, Tolland," Morrison explained. "They really need to be out of this cold. It's not healthy, not safe for anybody."

As the temperatures continue to drop over the next few days and wind chills dip below zero, police will make the rounds at places outside where the homeless are known to spend time.

"All police officers, our primary job is a caretaker, the preservation of life and property," said Morrison.

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<![CDATA[Warming Centers Open]]> Fri, 09 Jan 2015 07:18:31 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/cold+weather+second.jpg

As temperatures dip and wind chills plunge below zero, warming centers are opening up.

Bloomfield

The town of Bloomfield is opening warming centers from Jan. 5 through 9.

The Alvin & Beatrice Wood Human Services Center, at 330 Park Avenue, will be open from Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Use the Community/Youth Center entrance on the west side of the building. For information, call 860-769-3566.

Prosser Library, at 1 Tunxis Avenue, will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. from Monday through Thursday and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday. For information, call 860-243-9721.

McMahon Wintonbury Library, at 1015 Blue Hills Avenue, will be open from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday and Friday. For information, call 860-242-0041.

The town will provide water, but residents should bring their own food. Bring medications, emergency contact phone numbers and any other items you might need during the day. Service dogs are always welcome.

Bridgeport

The Greater Bridgeport Transit Main Bus Terminal at 710 Water Street will be open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. throughout the week.

Canton

Canton Public Library, at at 40 Dyer Avenue in the Collinsville section of Canton, is open, Monday through Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and on Friday and Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Senior Center is also located at 40 Dyer Avenue. See the calendar online for activities offered.

East Hartford

South End Senior Center, at 70 Canterbury Street, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., from Monday through Friday.

The police lobby at the Public Safety Complex, at 31 School Street, is open 24 hours on all days.

Hamden

The Miller Memorial Library and the Hamden Senior Center at 2901 Dixwell Avenue, the Whitneyville Branch Library at the corner of Carleton and Putnam avenues, the Brundage Community Branch Library at 91 Circular Avenue and the Hamden Government Center at 2750 will serve as warming centers during business hours.

After-hours warming centers are located at Hamden Police Headquarters at 2900 Dixwell Avenue, Fire Station 2 at 71 Circular Avenue, Fire Station 3 at 421 Hartford Turnpike, Fire Station 4 at 2372 Whitney Avenue, Fire Station 5 at 2993 Whitney Avenue and Fire Station 9 at 245 Johnson Road.

More information on hours and locations is available online or by calling 203-287-7100 during business hours.

Hartford

All Hartford city shelters will be opened because of the cold weather.

Meriden

The Meriden Senior Center at 22 West Main Street is open Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. as a warming center.

The Meriden Public Library will be open Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 a.m. until 8:30 p.m. and Thursday, Friday and Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. as a warming center. The library is located at 105 Miller Street.

Westfield Meriden Square is another place you can go to get warm at 470 Lewis Avenue. It's open from Monday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Middletown

Church of the Holy Trinity, at 381 Main Streett. The center will be open to the public, seven days a week, from 9 p.m until 7 a.m.

New Haven

The New Haven Public Library at 133 Elm Street will serve as a warming center from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Residents can warm up at the Fair Haven Branch Library at 182 Grand Avenue Monday and Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Mitchell Branch Library at 37 Harrison Street will be open Monday from noon to 8 p.m., Wednesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Stetson Branch Library at 200 Dixwell Avenue will be open Monday and Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday from noon to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Courtland Seymour Wilson Branch Library located at 303 Washington Avenue will serve as a warming center from noon to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.  and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

New Haven Union Station at 50 Union Avenue is open daily from 4 a.m. to 1 a.m.

The city has also added the Beth L Fellowship Hall, at 255 Goffe Street, as a temporary warming center. Enter through the main entrance at the corner of Orchard and Goffe Streets should be utilized.
The center is open from 10 p.m. until 7 a.m.

New London

The city of New London will open a warming center at the Senior Center at 120 Broad Street during business hours from Tuesday, Jan. 6 through Friday, Jan. 9.

Simsbury

The Simsbury Public Library at 725 Hopmeadow Street is serving as a warming center from 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday. Residents are advised to use the lower level entrance.

The Eno Memorial Hall Senior Center at 754 Hopmeadow Street is also available as a warming center from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday.

More information is available by calling Simsbury Social Services at 860-658-3283.

South Windsor

The South Windsor Community Center on Nevers Road and the South Windsor Library on Sullivan Avenue are both serving as warming centers during regular hours. After-hours help is available by calling 211.

Thomaston

The fire house at 245 South Main Street in Thomaston will function as a warming center as necessary. Anyone seeking shelter should call the police department at 860-283-4343 to make accommodations.

West Haven

West Haven will open a warming center on Jan. 7 and 8 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the basement conference room of city hall at 355 Main Street. No food or beverages will be served.

You can also check the state's 211 Web site for temporary warming centers.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Governor Activates State Severe Weather Protocol]]> Tue, 06 Jan 2015 16:04:44 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/461168865.jpg

As the temperatures plunge, Gov. Dannel Malloy has activated the state’s severe cold weather protocol from today through Saturday.

“We must continue to protect the most vulnerable during these severe cold weather outbreaks,” Malloy said in a statement. “I urge anyone in need of shelter to call 2-1-1 and encourage local communities to consider opening warming centers or other facilities to assist people in need.”

The high for today will be in the low 20s and dip down to around 12 degrees tonight. Expect a cold morning Thursday, with lows -5 and 5 degrees and wind chills as low as -25.

Wind chill watches have been issued for Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland and Windham counties from Wednesday evening through Thursday morning.

By activating the protocol, the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, the Department of Social Services, the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Department of Housing are directed to coordinate with 211 and the state network of shelters.

This also activates the DESPP’s Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security WebEOC communications network, an online system that allows local, regional and state emergency management officials and first responders to share up-to-date information about a variety of situations and conditions, monitor capacity at shelters across the state and allow 211 to act as a clearinghouse to assist in finding shelter space for those who need it.



Photo Credit: FILE/Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Hundreds of Schools Delayed Due to Extreme Cold]]> Thu, 08 Jan 2015 12:00:44 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/school+bus_south+windsor+generic.jpg

Hundreds of schools are opening late on Thursday morning as the coldest weather of the season is upon us.

A wind chill advisory is in effect statewide until this morning and we are in a deep freeze that will stick around as we battle subzero temperatures.

Temperatures are well below freezing early this morning and the wind chills are as low as negative-15 in Hartford and negative-16 in Windsor Locks.

Exposed skin can freeze in these conditions in just 30 minutes, so there is the danger of frost bite.

Gov. Dannel Malloy has activated the state's severe weather protocol through Saturday, and warming centers have opened across the state. Residents are advised to bring all pets indoors overnight as the bitter cold sets in.

Winds will diminish after sunrise on Thursday and temperatures should creep back up to around 20 degrees by the afternoon.

Snow developing early Friday could leave us with a coating to 2 inches of accumulation, causing the potential for slippery conditions during the morning commute. Wind gusts will also pick back up.

The American Red Cross recommends dressing in layers when spending time outside. Make sure to wear a hat, since most body heat is lost through your head, and wear mittens instead of gloves. Wear waterproof, insulated boots and warm yourself up with hot drinks or soup.

The weather is causing car problems and AAA’s Roadside Rescue Team has received more than 3,400 calls for emergency road service in Hartford, Middlesex, Tolland, Windham and New London counties so far this workweek, and they expect Thursday to be a busy day as well.

On Monday, they responded to 1,104 calls, including 302 battery problems, 118 flat tires and 92 lockouts. On Tuesday, they responded to 1,128 calls, including 334 battery problems, 128 flat tires and 107 lockouts. On Wednesday, the number of calls was up to 1,144, including 328 battery problems, 132 flat tires and 92 lockouts. As of 7 a.m. on Thursday, crews had already responded to 81 calls.

AAA recommends checking your car battery for warning signs, including your vehicle cranking slowly when you try to start it, a grinding, clicking or buzzing when you turn the ignition on and your vehicle stalling, your headlights dimming when you are idling but brightening when you rev the engine. They also recommend checking your battery if it is more than three years old.

AAA also recommends keeping an eye on your tires because cold weather can reduce tire pressure.

Aquarion Water Company is offering tips on how to keep the pipes in your house from freezing during the extremely cold temperatures:

  • Let a faucet fed by pipes exposed to the cold drip to prevent the water inside from freezing.
  • Never completely shut off the heat in a building unless all the pipes and toilets are drained first.
  • Keep the doors to rooms where the pipes and water meter are located, including sink cabinets, open so warm air can keep temperatures above freezing.
  • Eliminate cold drafts near water pipes (and, if indoors, the water meter) by filling cracks in walls and around windows, replacing broken glass, and installing storm windows on basement windows.



Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com
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<![CDATA[Snow Causes Slippery Roads, Prompts Cancellations]]> Sat, 03 Jan 2015 19:44:50 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/1314+snowmap.jpg

With snow and a wintry mix expected to continue into the evening, winter weather advisories have been issued for Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland and Windham counties.

Snow was already falling as early as 2 p.m. in various parts of the state, with some towns seeing as much as 1 to 3 inches of snow.

The wintry mix could make the roadways slippery and reduce visibility.

State police have responded to multiple crashes statewide.

Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks tweeted that the weather is causing flight delays, advising people flying to check with their airline to see if their departures are on schedule.

Metro-North reported delays of up to 20 minutes along the Danbury line due to the weather earlier in the evening.

There have already been some cancellations. Hillside Community Church in Bristol and Holy Trinity Orthodox in New Britain have canceled evening services. St. Michael's in Waterbury has canceled Bingo night and there will be no evening activities. Click here for more information on closings and cancellations.

The snow is expected to hold on in the northern part of the state until about 7:30 p.m. or 8 p.m., then transitioning to rain.

A few pockets to the far north may see an extended period of icing on Saturday night.

Torrington saw a couple inches early Saturday evening.

“I just came in from doing some errands and just saw the snow piling up on the sidewalk and the driveway," Andrew Tait, of Torrington, said. "Just trying to get rid of it before it creates any problems."

Tait says for just the second or third time this season he brought out the shovel to clear his Torrington driveway.

“It was weird having it so warm over Christmas. So, I guess we were kind of lucky with that after the last couple winters," Tait said.

Plow crews tried to get ahead of the storm, putting down product and plowing streets.

Drivers were experiencing slippery roads.

“We were actually out in Farmington. It was pretty bad. We actually almost got into an accident," Crystal Emerson, of Torrington, said, who went to Carl's TrueValue to get a new shovel.

Michael Czekierda, of Carl’s TrueValu, said it wasn't too busy Saturday at the store.

"I think everybody stocked up on the winter stuff in the beginning of the season. We haven’t had much snow until right now," he said.

Temperatures in southern Connecticut are expected to be above freezing, with inland areas experiencing near freezing termperatures through 8 p.m.

As temperatures rise into the 40s and 50s on Sunday, winter weather will change over to rain, washing away post of the newly fallen snow.

Periods of heavy rain will continue on Sunday.

Next week will begin with cooler temperatures, but bitter cold will take over toward the end of the week.


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<![CDATA[Wet and Windy Christmas Weather]]> Wed, 24 Dec 2014 19:11:24 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/christmasrain_crop.jpg

We'll have to wait another year for that white Christmas.

Although no snow is in store, a storm is bringing heavy rain Christmas Eve into Christmas Day.

According to NBC Connecticut First Alert Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan rain will continue off and on through early Christmas morning. Up to 1 1/2 inches of rain is possible in some areas.

As the rain tapers off gusty winds will develop on Thursday with wind speeds possibly reaching 40 mph. At this point rainfall amounts will be light enough to preclude widespread flooding issues. While wind gusts may bring down a handful of tree limbs and branches widespread power issues are not anticipated.

Thunderstorms are possible overnight into Thursday morning as temperatures warm to nearly 60 degrees by Christmas morning.

Strong winds could also impact holiday air travel. If you're flying this week, check with your air carrier for updates on your flight status.

Temperatures are expected to drop next week, and we could see some snow around New Year's Eve.



Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut
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<![CDATA[Rain to Dampen Christmas Travel]]> Tue, 23 Dec 2014 10:35:50 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Dec+22+6HREXACT.jpg

The weather pattern looks pretty dismal for the next several days, including rain on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, which could make holiday traveling challenging.

A weak storm could produce scattered showers Tuesday during the day and evening, with temperatures possibly reaching a high of 46.

A stronger storm coming in could bring heavy rain and increasing winds Wednesday afternoon and continue into Christmas Day. Wind speeds in the south could reach 20 to 30 miles an hour along the shoreline.

While pockets of heavy rain is possible Christmas morning, it will likely clear quickly and turn sunny.

A strengthening area of storminess will roll into the Great Lakes on a track that brings us nothing but rain here in Connecticut.

An inch and a half or two of rain is likely, accompanied by very mild temperatures -- in the 50s -- and gusty southerly winds.

This weather will make for challenging travel across the region by car, train and airplane.
 


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<![CDATA[Ski Report]]> Fri, 19 Dec 2014 20:25:51 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Ski_Report_1200x675_375283779825.jpg ]]> <![CDATA[Snow Burst for Parts of State ]]> Thu, 18 Dec 2014 07:20:01 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Lakeville+snow+1200.jpg

A burst of snow early Thursday morning brought between a coating and an inch of snow, which is enough to create some issues, including icy roads in Litchfield County, as well as in Tolland.

Elsewhere, the temperatures are above freezing, so anything falling is just creating wet roads.

Any rain and snow showers will end quickly, then it will become partly sunny and windy, with high temperatures between 40 and 45 degrees.
 

If it is snowing where you are, send photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: Theodore O'Neill
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<![CDATA[Snow Showers Caused Slick Roads, School Delays]]> Thu, 11 Dec 2014 13:11:56 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Cornwall+snow+1200.jpg

Scattered snow showers caused slippery driving conditions this morning and led to dozens of school delays.

Most of the state is getting between a coating to 2 inches of snow, but up to 4 inches of snow was not out of the question in the northwest hills.

Later today, ice could be an issue as the precipitation freezes, especially on untreated roads.

Send your snow photos to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



Photo Credit: Amanda Chase
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<![CDATA[2014 Winter Forecast]]> Wed, 10 Dec 2014 08:04:12 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/2014_Winter_Forecast_1200x675_369245251979.jpg ]]> <![CDATA[Norfolk Is the Ice Box of Connecticut]]> Wed, 10 Dec 2014 08:05:15 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Norfolk_Is_the_Ice_Box_of_Connecticut_1200x675_369256515821.jpg ]]> <![CDATA[Behind the Scenes at the NBC Connecticut Weather Center]]> Wed, 10 Dec 2014 08:03:25 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/Behind_the_Scenes_at_the_NBC_Connecticut_Weather_Center_1200x675_369245763783.jpg ]]> <![CDATA[Long Range Forecasting]]> Wed, 03 Dec 2014 14:12:04 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/longpic00000000.jpg Brad Field travels to Weather Services International near Boston to talk to some of the best seasonal forecasters in the country.]]> <![CDATA[Ice Made for Dangerous Driving]]> Tue, 09 Dec 2014 10:57:14 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/160*120/038f8d64212d4aa9ab5508ffc35ecbd2.jpg Icy conditions led to dangerous travel on the roads this morning.]]> <![CDATA[Ski Mountains Prep All Year Long]]> Wed, 03 Dec 2014 14:14:00 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/wxspskisundown0595858956.jpg Mountain workers prep all year long for ski season.]]> <![CDATA[Farms Prepare Throughout Winter]]> Wed, 03 Dec 2014 14:15:23 -0500 http://media.nbcconnecticut.com/images/213*120/wxspdarrenfarm949392393.jpg Just because it is winter does not mean a farm sits still.]]>