Heavy Rain Washes Out Parts of State

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    NEWSLETTERS

    From washed out streets to canceled flights, Connecticut residents battled rain throughout most of the day. (Published Wednesday, Aug 13, 2014)

    Skies have begun to clear, but rain fell hard and fast across much of the state earlier today, dumping more than 5 inches over Norwalk and surrounding towns, according to Chief Meteorologist Brad Field.

    Flash flood warnings were issued for northwestern Tolland County and northern Hartford County until 5:30 p.m. and a flash flood watch remains in effect for Windham County until 8 p.m.

    Rain fell at a rate of 1-3 inches per hour in southeastern Connecticut this morning, then moved north toward the Massachusetts border. Field said most of the precipitation is over for us, but we could see a few more localized rain or thunder showers coming in from the west. 

    Heavy rainfall flooded streets along the shoreline, washing out First Avenue in West Haven, Beach Avenue in Milford and the Madison Golf Club, among others. Some areas of the state saw more than a month's worth of rain in just a few short hours.

    Towns that haven't seen flooding at this point are no longer at risk, Field said.

    Long Island was hit the hardest, receiving a record 13.88 inches of rain that had many neighborhoods underwater, according to Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan.

    Local fire officials said the drainage system is designed to handle 5 inches of rain over 24 hours and was completely overloaded. Some residents said their homes flooded for the first time today.

    The weather caused travel problems in parts of the state. John Harrington, a Cromwell resident who followed Interstate 91 into Enfield at the height of the storm, said he saw a number of cars hydroplane on the highway. Visibility and road conditions were poor.

    Bradley International Airport also reported flight delays Wednesday afternoon.

    The National Weather Service reminds motorists to avoid roads covered with water because they may be deeper than expected.

    If you see severe weather and can safely take photos, send them to shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.