Schools Delayed or Closed as State Digs Out | NBC Connecticut

Schools Delayed or Closed as State Digs Out

NBCConnecticut.com
School buses are still buried on Walbach Street in New London.

Connecticut residents continue to dig out after the Blizzard of 2015 dumped up to 33 inches of snow on the state and hundreds of schools are either closed for the day or opening late.

Students at the University of Connecticut campuses in Storrs and Avery Point will return to class today, beginning at 10 a.m., while all other UConn campuses will operate on normal class schedules.

Eastern Connecticut took the brunt of the storm, with the highest snow totals recorded along the shoreline and Rhode Island border in New London and Windham counties.

The highest snow totals of the state were recorded in Thompson, which received 33.5 inches, according to the National Weather Service. Putnam, Moosup, East Killingly, Lisbon, Colchester, Norwich, Groton all received more than 2 feet of snow.

Many parts of western Connecticut, on the other hand, saw single-digit accumulations, as the heaviest band of snow veered east. More information on snow totals is available here.

While flurries will slowly taper off, the cold will linger, with temperatures dipping down into the single digits on Wednesday.

While several schools are closed for the day, this is the first day back to work for many after Gov. Dannel Malloy lifted a statewide travel ban at 2 p.m. Tuesday.

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More than 600 state Department of Transportation crews and the state's fleet of 15 super snow blowers have been working around the clock to clear roads since Monday, but the governor urged caution on the roads because of any lingering snow or ice.

While the highways and many of the Malloy also asked residents to help clear fire hydrants and storm drains and make sure snow is not blocking vents for heating and hot water systems.

While residents of many towns are able to get around, the Connecticut National Guard has been deployed to Stonington, one of the hardest-hit areas of the state, and Bridgeport is sending four snow trucks to New London to help the city dig out.

The next chance of snow is during the morning commute on Friday

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