government

Transparency Concerns: Somers Residents Question Plans to Change Government Format

Currently, the first selectman manages the town’s day-to-day operations. The new format has an unelected administrator in charge.

NBC Universal, Inc.

There is open rebellion in Somers against its first selectman.

Last year NBC Connecticut Investigates broke the story about how First Selectman Bud Knorr gave himself a raise and bonus - one that he ended up giving back after our report.

Now members of his own party are calling him out for changing the town’s form of government. Many in town said they had no idea was happening.

This all happened in the past few weeks.

While the meetings were posted to the Board of Selectman’s YouTube page, there are complaints there was no notice or public comment on this change, which goes into effect next month.

In fact, this week a taxpayer in town filed a freedom of information complaint against Knorr and the board that voted in this change, claiming they were not transparent as they prepared to alter the town government format.

Currently, the first selectman manages the town’s day-to-day operations. The new format has an unelected administrator in charge.

Town Republicans Tuesday night also voted to censure Knorr, who is a member of the GOP, in connection with the incident last summer where he gave himself a raise and bonus.

We have reached out to Knorr for comment.  He has not responded.

The Board of Selectmen is likely to get an earful about this, and soon. There are signs across town urging people to show up both at a Board of Selectman meeting June 3, and a Board of Finance meeting Tuesday, June 8. 

Contact Us