Taking Art to New Heights – Mt. Everest - NBC Connecticut

Taking Art to New Heights – Mt. Everest

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Taking Art to New Heights – Mt. Everest
    United Nations
    Stairway of painted sneakers: Ranan Lurie's "Uniting Painting" adorned with Stephon Marbury's donated shoes.

    When Ranan Lurie takes on a project, he takes it to the limits, but he’s never take one to this height.

    He holds two World Records, one for being the most widely syndicated political cartoonist in the world. The other is for being the scion of the oldest recorded living family today. His family is descended from the royal house of King David.

    Now, Lurie, formerly of Greenwich and now of New York, is going beyond those limits and holding an exhibit on the tallest peak in the world – Mt. Everest, according to Greenwich Time.

    "To my knowledge, it is the first piece of art to be put on top of Everest. It is a nice achievement," Lurie told the newspaper.

    Nice acheivement indeed.

    In 2011, climbers will bring three canvases from “Uniting Painting” up the mountain.

    These Lurie masterpieces were on display at the United Nations, according to the newspaper. Once they are up the mountain, they will go into a mausoleum, where anyone who can actually make it to the top can see his work.

    "I am very pleased to learn that Mr. Ranan Lurie will bring his world famous art the Uniting Painting to the top of Mount Everest in Nepal," said Sujata Koirala, foreign minister of Nepal in a recent statement, Greenwich Time reports. "By doing that, Mr. Lurie will help our country, Nepal, to become the Art Center of Asia and the symbol of humanity, equality and peace for the entire world through his art."

    "Uniting Painting" is an international art exhibit spanning several continents. It has been in the works since 1968 and the mission is to connect the world by art and goodwill, according to a U.N. new release

    Lurie’s work once reached more than 300 million readers each day in 1,100 publications, according to the Center for Professional Journalism Studies.