2021 presidential inauguration

CT Poet Laureate Says Inauguration Poem Was Exactly What the Nation Needed

Margaret Gibson, whose writings span over five decades and 12 books, emphasizes that Gorman's success is a reminder to the country of the power of words and the role they play in our shared experiences.

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After Wednesday's poem reciting at the inauguration, National Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman has become a household name overnight and now Connecticut's very own Poet Laureate is weighing on the impact of the speech.

"I thought she was exactly what the moment needed," said Margaret Gibson, Connecticut State Poet Laureate. "An inaugural poem is offered to the entire country. So it’s not poetry, a private musing and reflection. It’s a poem in which the musing and reflection has already taken place and has become a sort of revelation a way of seeing that is ready to be shared."

Gibson, whose writings span over five decades and 12 books, emphasizes that Gorman's success is a reminder to the country of the power of words and the role they play in our shared experiences.

"I think that poetry, when it’s at its best and at its timeliness, gives us hope for clarity truth and a shared reality," said Gibson. "A poem is not completed when it is written by the person whose written, it’s completed when it’s heard by other human beings."

Gorman's speech has impacted the nation and especially young people. At Woodstock Academy, Meghan Mizak's AP language and composition course has been discussing Gorman's poem, its impact and how the use of language can make a difference in delivery.

"We're always talking about the different meanings of words," said Mizak. "We're constantly talking about how the speaker is addressing their audience and make different appeals."

Woodstock Academy student Vincent Tocci weighs in saying, "I feel like she spoke to us almost and gave us a voice a younger generation."

"It was like listening to a work of art but each sentence packed a punch. It seemed like even as I’m re-reading now, each sentence has its own intention and is so purposeful," student Zoe Botta said.

Gorman, 22, along with President Joe Biden, have something in common: they've both dealt with speech communication disorders.

Sarah Moon, a director of special services and speech pathologist at LEARN, speaks to how the representation of both Gorman and Biden will help many in the same situation.

"I think my message is delivered by the two of them, by President Biden and Amanda Gorman," said Moon. "You can work hard and do what makes you happy and be who you want to be regardless of any type of communication disorder or disability that you are dealing with."

For resources on dealing with communication disorders visit the below websites:

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