Acting DHS Chief: Family Separations 'Not Worth It' From Enforcement Perspective - NBC Connecticut
Immigration in America

Immigration in America

Full coverage of immigration issues in the U.S.

Acting DHS Chief: Family Separations 'Not Worth It' From Enforcement Perspective

His predecessor, Kirstjen Nielsen, was forced out of the job earlier this month, in part because she'd refused to reinstate the policy of separating children from their families at the border, U.S. officials have told NBC News

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    Acting Homeland Security chief Kevin McAleenan told NBC News that separating migrant families at the U.S. southern border is "not on the table," and the policy was "not worth it" from an enforcement perspective.

    In his first network interview as acting DHS secretary to broadcast, McAleenan told NBC News' Lester Holt on Tuesday, "We're not pursuing that approach."

    Of the children separated from their families at the border, "they were always intended to be reunited," McAleenan said.

    "Really a better system, as I've said many times, would allow us to detain families together during fair and expeditious immigration proceedings and getting actual immigration results from courts, so that’s what’s missing from the current situation," he added in an interview from DHS's offices in the World Trade Center.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)