Companies Are Helping Schools Teach Students How to Work for Them - NBC Connecticut
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Companies Are Helping Schools Teach Students How to Work for Them

Nationwide, there were 6.2 million job openings at the end of June, a record high

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    With more factory jobs now demanding education, technical know-how or specialized skills, many US plants are struggling to fill positions. (Published Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017)

    Some companies are so set on having workers who know just how their computer systems work that they're partnering with schools to start or invest in job training programs of their own, NBC News reported.

    Call it "new collar" jobs, as opposed to white collar and blue collar. They require some specialized education to get the job, but not a four-year degree.

    For example, Delta has partnered with 37 aviation maintenance schools to help shed light on the often-technical aviation maintenance technician job. A company executive said that the curriculum required by the Federal Aviation Administration is "very generic" and that it takes at least a year of working at Delta even with certification to be able to sign off on anything as an AMT.

    Nationwide, there were 6.2 million job openings at the end of June, a record high, and many of these openings are "new collar jobs that are unfilled as a result of an unskilled and under-skilled workforce," said Eugene Giovannini, chancellor at Tarrant County College in Texas.