• coronavirus chicago Jun 19

    Unique Coronavirus Strain Found in Chicago: Northwestern Study

    Northwestern University researchers have discovered Chicago has a unique COVID-19 virus strain that appears to be directly linked from the early outbreak in China, the university said in a news release Thursday. Another variant discovered in Chicago COVID-19 patients, which happens to be the predominant variant worldwide, and in the U.S. is centered in New York, generates more of...

  • MEGHAN MARKLE Jan 15

    From Hollywood to Kensington: Meghan Markle's Life in Photos

    See Meghan Markle’s life in photos from her days at Northwestern University, to her first breakout role in “Suits,” to her engagement with Britain’s Prince Harry.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Nov 11, 2019

    Cholesterol Levels Dropping in US, But Many Still Need Care

    Some good health news: Americans’ cholesterol levels are dropping, and more people at especially high risk are getting treatment. Researchers say Monday’s report suggests a controversial change in recommendations for cholesterol treatment may be starting to pay off. “It is very heartening,” said Dr. Pankaj Arora of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, who led the study. “But there is...

  • Donald Trump Sep 22, 2019

    How the Past Informs Trump's Vision of America's Future

    President Donald Trump’s vision of America’s tomorrows looks much like its yesterdays. He loves “beautiful” coal. “Beautiful” warships. And “those four beautiful words: MADE IN THE USA!” He speaks of the country’s might as measured by its steel mills, farms and cars rolling off Detroit assembly lines. He’s not merely summoning happy memories. His nostalgia shapes policy and lives,...

  • Donald Trump Aug 30, 2019

    Politics of Climate Change Put Corporations in Tough Spot

    The polarizing politics of climate change have forced companies to choose between supporting the Trump administration’s deregulation policies that could boost profits or opposing them to win over environmentally conscious consumers. That dynamic played out again Thursday when President Donald Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency sought to revoke regulations on methane gas emissions from oil facilities. British Petroleum, ExxonMobil and Royal...

  • Chicago Jun 13, 2019

    Sleeping With the TV On May Make You Gain Weight

    Dozing off to late-night TV or sleeping with other lights on may mix up your metabolism and lead to weight gain and even obesity, provocative but preliminary U.S. research suggests. The National Institutes of Health study published Monday isn’t proof, but it bolsters evidence suggesting that too much exposure to light at night could pose health risks. “Evolutionarily we are...

  • Chicago Jun 10, 2019

    Sleeping With the TV on May Make You Gain Weight

    Dozing off to late-night TV or sleeping with other lights on may mix up your metabolism and lead to weight gain and even obesity, provocative but preliminary U.S. research suggests. The National Institutes of Health study published Monday isn’t proof, but it bolsters evidence suggesting that too much exposure to light at night could pose health risks. “Evolutionarily we are...

  • United States Mar 15, 2019

    Are Eggs Good or Bad for You? New Research Rekindles Debate

    The latest U.S. research on eggs won’t go over easy for those can’t eat breakfast without them. Adults who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs. The study showed the more eggs, the greater the risk. The chances of dying early were also elevated. The researchers say...

  • actress Jan 30, 2019

    Super Bowl Ads Offer Simple Escapism With Star Power

    Advertisers are hoping to provide some welcome distraction and entertainment as economic fears persist and the nation’s political climate remains sharply divided.

  • Asher Klein Nov 12, 2018

    New Exercise Guidelines: Move More, Sit Less, Start Younger

    Move more, sit less and get kids active as young as age 3, say new federal guidelines that stress that any amount and any type of exercise helps health. The advice is the first update since the government’s physical activity guidelines came out a decade ago. Since then, the list of benefits of exercise has grown, and there’s more evidence...

  • JUDGE Nov 12, 2018

    Democrat Abrams Files New Suit in Georgia Governor's Race

    Stacey Abrams’ Democratic campaign filed a federal lawsuit Sunday asking a judge to delay vote certifications in Georgia’s unsettled governor’s race by one day and to make officials count any votes that were wrongly rejected. If successful, the suit would prevent officials from certifying county vote totals until Wednesday and could restore at least 1,095 votes that weren’t counted. The...

  • Donald Trump Oct 30, 2018

    Amid Global Uproar, Some US Colleges Rethink Saudi Ties

    U.S. colleges and universities have received more than $350 million from the Saudi government this decade, yet some are rethinking their arrangements in the wake of the killing of a journalist that has ignited a global uproar against the oil-rich nation. The Associated Press analyzed federal data and found that at least $354 million from the Saudi government or institutions...

  • Houston Oct 23, 2018

    Red Sox Sluggers Happy to Snooze at Fenway Park

    Think the Red Sox are asleep at the ballpark? You may be right. Catching some Zzzzs during downtime could help Boston be more alert during the first coast-to-coast World Series in 20 years. A sleep room was opened last year at Fenway Park, adjacent to the gym next to the home clubhouse. Two bunk beds contain four queen-sized mattresses.

  • California Apr 26, 2018

    Oh Brother! Prince William to Be Harry's Best Man

    It’s a family affair: Britain’s royal officials say Prince Harry has asked elder brother Prince William to be best man at his wedding next month.

  • California Apr 10, 2018

    New Way of Defining Alzheimer's Aims to Find Disease Sooner

    Government and other scientists are proposing a new way to define Alzheimer’s disease — basing it on biological signs, such as brain changes, rather than memory loss and other symptoms of dementia that are used today. The move is aimed at improving research, by using more objective criteria like brain scans to pick patients for studies and enroll them sooner...

  • director Apr 3, 2018

    Midlife ‘Wealth Shock' May Lead to Death, Study Suggests

    A big financial loss may shorten your life, a new study suggests. Middle-aged Americans who experienced a sudden, large economic blow were more likely to die during the following years than those who didn’t. The heightened danger of death after a devastating loss, which researchers called a “wealth shock,” crossed socio-economic lines, affecting people no matter how much money they...

  • California Mar 19, 2018

    Brains of ‘Superagers' Offer Clues to Keeping Sharp

    It’s pretty extraordinary for people in their 80s and 90s to keep the same sharp memory as someone several decades younger, and now scientists are peeking into the brains of these “superagers” to uncover their secret. The work is the flip side of the disappointing hunt for new drugs to fight or prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Chicago Mar 15, 2018

    Northwestern Gunman Report Was ‘Swatting' Hoax: Cops

    A person with a gun was reported Wednesday on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, school officials said.

  • Canada Mar 6, 2018

    Prescription Opioids Fail Rigorous New Test for Chronic Pain

    A yearlong study offers rigorous new evidence against using prescription opioids for chronic pain. In patients with stubborn back aches or hip or knee arthritis, opioids worked no better than over-the-counter drugs or other nonopioids at reducing problems with walking or sleeping. And they provided slightly less pain relief, Opioids tested included generic Vicodin, oxycodone or fentanyl patches although few...

  • Chicago Dec 29, 2017

    Experts Try to Keep Georgia O'Keeffe Paintings From Fading

    Chemical reactions are gradually darkening many of Georgia O’Keeffe’s famously vibrant paintings, and art conservation experts are hoping new digital imaging tools can help them slow the damage. Scientific experts in art conservation from Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the Chicago area announced plans this week to develop advanced 3-D imaging technology to detect destructive buildup in paintings by O’Keeffe...

Contact Us