Morbidly Obese Calif. Man Sheds 254 Lbs After YouTube Plea

By Marianne Favro
|  Thursday, Jan 2, 2014  |  Updated 9:38 AM EDT
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An obese 24-year-old Livermore man, who weighed over 700 pounds at one time, said he has lost over 200 pounds. NBC Bay Area's Marianne Favro reports.

An obese 24-year-old Livermore man, who weighed over 700 pounds at one time, said he has lost over 200 pounds. NBC Bay Area's Marianne Favro reports.

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Raw Video: Morbidly Obese Man Pleads for Help

A morbidly obese Livermore man is seeking help in his quest to lose weight -- and to stay alive to watch his niece and nephew grow up. He has posted a video to YouTube, hoping it will go viral.
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Nearly two years ago, Robert Gibbs weighed in at 764 pounds and could barely move, which prompted him to upload a YouTube video asking for help.

The video went viral. Within a few months he was on the Dr. Phil show and attending a special wellness camp.

Now, on New Year's Day 2014, the 24-year-old Livermore resident is 254 pounds lighter.

"I don't think I would be standing here talking to you today if my video had not gone viral and everybody hadn't reached out," Gibbs said.

Gibbs admits getting started was tough but critical to his success.

"Every moment counts, even if you are stuck and you can't stand up," he said. "Move your arms. You need to do something."

Gibbs has now gone from making simple arm movements to lifting 15-pound weights every day. He also works out at a gym several times and climbs his stairs at home several times a day.

To help in his weight loss, Gibbs has shunned junk food and embraced veggies. He also embraces being able to play with his nephew and niece.

"Now I have a new lease on life," he said. "I'm out here playing with my niece, and I can go up and down stairs more."

As Gibbs rings in the new year, he said he is still working to achieve his ultimate goal of shedding another 200 pounds. He also said he knows what it's like to feel you don't have a future, but he wants those who are in the same position he was in two years ago to know there is still hope.

"If you can still breathe and have a heartbeat there is still time to save your life," Gibbs said.

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