Audi CEO Detained in Germany Diesel Emissions Case - NBC Connecticut
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Audi CEO Detained in Germany Diesel Emissions Case

Rupert Stadler's detention is an extension of the emissions scandal that has rocked Volkswagen since 2015 and led to billions in fines, the arrest of executives and the indictment in the U.S. of its former CEO

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    2019 Open Enrollment Made Easy
    picture alliance via Getty Image
    Audi CEO Rupert Stadler is seen in this file photo from May 2018. Stadler's detention follows a search last week of his private residence, ordered by Munich prosecutors investigating the manager on suspicion of fraud and indirect improprieties with documents.

    German authorities on Monday detained the chief executive of Volkswagen's Audi division, Rupert Stadler, as part of a probe into the manipulation of emissions controls.

    The move is an extension of the emissions scandal that has rocked Volkswagen since 2015 and led to billions in fines, the arrest of executives and the indictment in the U.S. of its former CEO.

    Stadler's detention follows a search last week of his private residence, ordered by Munich prosecutors investigating the manager on suspicion of fraud and indirect improprieties with documents.

    "Audi CEO Rupert Stadler was provisionally arrested this morning," the company said in a statement. It said shortly afterward that a judge had ordered him kept in custody pending possible charges at prosecutors' request.

    Explosion at Japanese Pub Injures Over 40 People

    [NATL] Explosion at Japanese Pub Injures Over 40 People

    The explosion happened in the Northern Japanesse city of Sapporo Sunday evening.

    (Published Sunday, Dec. 16, 2018)

    The company said that it couldn't comment further due to the ongoing investigation, but stressed that "the presumption of innocence remains in place for Mr. Stadler."

    German news agency dpa reported that prosecutors decided to seek Stadler's arrest due to fears he might try to evade justice. A former head of Audi's engine development unit is already in investigative detention.

    A total of 20 people are under suspicion in the Audi probe, which focuses on cars sold in Europe that were believed to be equipped with software that turned emissions controls on during lab testing and off again during regular driving to enhance road performance.

    Audi said in a statement last week that it was "cooperating with the authorities" in the probe.

    Volkswagen first admitted in 2015 of using software to cheat on U.S. emissions tests. That has cost it $20 billion in fines and civil settlements.

    Volkswagen has pleaded guilty to criminal charges in the United States and nine managers, including former CEO Martin Winterkorn, were charged there. Two are serving prison terms; Winterkorn and the others remained in Germany and are unlikely to be extradited.

    Al Roker Looks Back on 40 Years at NBC

    [NY-NATL] Al Roker Looks Back on 40 Years at NBC

    Today Show's Al Roker is celebrating 40 years at NBC, and he takes a moment with old pal Janice Huff to talk about his history with WNBC, the memorable storms they've covered and that infamous Doppler 4000 promo.

    (Published Friday, Dec. 14, 2018)

    German authorities this month fined Volkswagen $1.2 billion as part of their own investigation. They are also investigating Winterkorn and 48 others.

    The arrest of the Audi CEO comes just weeks after Volkswagen tapped a new CEO to move the company past the scandal. Herbert Diess was given the top job in April and he said that besides focusing on new technologies, like electric cars, he wanted to build a more open, values-based culture to avoid the cheating that led to the emissions scandal.

    Volkswagen shares were down 2.1 percent at 157.66 euros in Frankfurt trading.