Watch: Snake Climbs Into Roof of Farmington Home - NBC Connecticut

Watch: Snake Climbs Into Roof of Farmington Home

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Snake Climbs Into Roof of Farmington Home

    A Farmington family caught a 7-foot rat snake on camera as it climbed onto and then into their roof on Monday.

    (Published Tuesday, May 21, 2019)

    If you live in suburban Connecticut, especially in a wooded area, deer, fox, coyote and even bear sightings are relatively common, and some might say, interesting. But snake sightings usually get a different response.

    “We had an unexpected visitor. An unwelcome visitor. A giant black rat snake,” explained Linda Bertolette of Farmington.

    Bertolette has seen snakes in her yard before. On Monday however, an estimated 7-foot black rat snake was dangling from her roof. All while her teenage daughter was peering out the window.

    The moment was caught on videotape as the teenage girl recorded the moment, later posting on social media.

    “I was appalled at the size of it and how aggressive it was,” added Bertolette. “It looked like a video that was taken in the Amazon jungle not in Connecticut.”

    The snake recoiled to the roof before disappearing, leaving the Bertolettes to wonder – throughout the night – where it might be.

    “You go to bed at night and you’re listening for slithering if you can even imagine that noise,” said Bertolette. “I was ready to bail. I was pretty much ready to put the house on the market.”

    An exterminator inspected the home Tuesday morning but no snake was found.

    “Ever since the exterminator came and assured me that it did not make a home in our attic and that the roof is tight and he couldn’t find any holes I feel much better about the whole thing,” said a relieved Bertolette.

    Black rat snakes are non-poisonous and known as good climbers. They live in fields, woodlands and farmlands around Connecticut communities like Farmington. However, exterminator Shane Daniotti of Tolland says they are not a serious threat.

    “They’re non-poisonous. They’re actually good for the environment,” he says. “They’re very pretty snakes and you just kinda have to live with them.”

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