Lego Unveils Its First Figure in a Wheelchair | NBC Connecticut

Lego Unveils Its First Figure in a Wheelchair



    Daniel Karmann/AFP/Getty Images
    A Lego figure in a wheelchair is pictured at the Lego booth on January 28, 2016 in Nuremberg, Germany, during the 67th International Toy Fair.

    Toy giant Lego is becoming more diverse and inclusive. 

    A fan video posted on YouTube Wednesday featured a Lego City set with a figure of a boy that uses a wheelchair. The minifigure, who wears a cap and a hoodie, was also showcased on German fan blog Promobricks, which called the move “long overdue.” The figurine was first spotted at a toy fair in Nuremburg, Germany. 

    A Lego spokesperson confirmed the news in an email to NBC Owned Television Stations. It's the first time the company has made a figure that uses a wheelchair.

    “We are introducing a LEGO City set later this year that features a minifigure scale wheelchair. It will be available starting in June,” the email said.

    Toymakers like Lego have been under pressure to be more reflective of real life and to be more diverse in their offerings.

    Activists are applauding the news.  

    "We changed the world today as Lego reveal first disabled mini-figures in response to ‪#‎ToyLikeMe‬," said in a Facebook post of online campaign #ToyLikeMe, which says it represents parents of children with disabilities. 

    #ToyLikeMe has called on Lego to be more reflective of disability in its toys. Its petition has already gained more than 20,000 supporters. 

    “Your little plastic bricks and mini figures are loved the world over, we love them too,” the petition says. “Please, Lego, put some wheelchair vroom vroom into the toy box and help generations of kids, (both with and without disabilities), grow up with a more positive attitude to human difference!”