New Home Built For Injured Marine

Manny Jimenez was severely injured in August 2010

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A disabled Connecticut marine is getting a helping hand, and a place to call his own. Hundreds of volunteers are building Manny Jimenez a home in Glastonbury.

    A disabled Connecticut Marine received a helping hand from the community, and now he’ll eventually have a place to call his own.

    One hundred emergency responders from New York City, showed up Thursday to frame and side Manny Jimenez's home on Addiston Road in Glastonbury.

    What should have taken months to finish, will be complete in just a few days. Volunteers will work through the weekend.

    Making a Difference - New Home Built For Injured Marine

    [HAR] Making a Difference - New Home Built For Injured Marine
    A disabled Connecticut marine is getting a helping hand, and a place to call his own. Hundreds of volunteers are building Manny Jimenez a home in Glastonbury.

    “You know this is an incredible amount of work,” said Bill Keegan, founder of Heart 9-11.

    In August of 2010 the Connecticut Marine was hit by an explosive while serving in Afghanistan.  He lost an arm and some of his hearing.

    “Having been through the World Trade Center and 9-11, we certainly know what it’s like to be down on your knees and need help,” Keegan said.  That's why Heart 9-11 stepped in and give Manny Jimenez a place to live.

    Jimenez has been watching the construction, and was amazed with the progress. You're living the extreme home makeover edition, we're seeing everything come up in front of our eyes,” said Jimenez. 

    Dan Beatty with Purple Heart Homes, helped come up with this project, and got the community to donate most of the supplies. “Manny is in the same situation I was eight years ago. Recently injured returning from services,” Beatty said. 

    Once Jimenez is done with treatment at Walter Reed Hospital, he won’t have to worry about finding a place to call home, thanks to these volunteers.  “It means I have one less obstacle when I get home I can transition and go to school,” said Jimenez.

    Manny Jimenez was grateful for their generosity. “By them helping, it means there are still people out there that care about military service veterans coming back,” Jimenez said. 

    Construction should be complete by the middle of May.  Jimenez will move into the home sometime in June.