West Nile, EEE Detected in Mosquitoes in East Haven, Stamford, Voluntown - NBC Connecticut

West Nile, EEE Detected in Mosquitoes in East Haven, Stamford, Voluntown

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    West Nile virus has been detected in mosquitoes in East Haven and Stamford and the Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus have been detected in mosquitoes in Voluntown.

    The Mosquito Trapping and Testing Report released Monday says three mosquitoes trapped on Kenneth Street in East Haven on Aug. 1 and three trapped on Intervale Road in Stamford on July 30 tested positive for West Nile virus.

    EEE was found in mosquitoes trapped on Mt. Misery in Voluntown. The virus was found in 178 that were trapped on Aug. 7 and 77 that were trapped on Aug. 8.

    See the full report here. 

    What You Need to Know About West Nile Virus:

    West Nile virus, which is spread to people through the bite of infected mosquitoes, is the leading cause of mosquito-borne illness across the United States, including in Connecticut, according to the state Department of Health. The symptoms you could experience from an infection range from none to severe. 

    Severe symptoms include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis, according to the CDC, and you should see a doctor if you develop them. 

    What You Need to Know About Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    Eastern Equine encephalitis virus is also spread through bites from infected mosquitoes and the state Department of Health reports EEEV is rare in the United States with an average of seven cases reported each year. No vaccine is available.

    Approximately one third of people who become sick from EEEV will die from the illness, according to the state Department of Health. They urge that early treatment can lower the risk of complications and death.

    Find out what you need to know about the symptoms from the CDC. 

    Prevention

    The best prevention is to avoid getting bitten. Find tips here. 

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