What Is a Bomb Cyclone? - NBC Connecticut

What Is a Bomb Cyclone?

Storm to Bring Rain & Wind

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    NEWSLETTERS

    What to Know About a Bomb Cyclone

    What you need to know about a bomb cyclone.

    (Published Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019)

    The NBC Connecticut meteorologist have issued a First Alert for strong winds and heavy rain. The storm will rapidly intensify and will reach the critieria of a "bomb cyclone." 

    What is a Bomb Cyclone

    A bomb cyclone is a rapidly strengthening area of low pressure. In order to be considered a bomb cyclone, pressure has to drop 24mb in 24 hours. The storm forecast to move into New England tonight will be even stronger, dropping about 30mb in 24 hours. 

    At 4 a.m. the Hartford area tied the current record for the strongest October storm on record set back in 2006 when the pressure dropped to 980mb. The current record for the Bridgeport area stands at 972mb during Hurricane Sandy.

    Even though the barometric pressure will be exceedingly low the storm will not be nearly as severe as other October storms we've had like Sandy or the October Snowstorm. Still, winds will gust anywhere from 30 to 40mph with even higher winds at shoreline gusting up to 50mph. 

    Heavy rain will also accompany the storm and we are expected anywhere from 1 to 3 inches of rain in a short period of time, which might result in urban street flooding.