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Maya Moore WNBA Jerseys Are Very Popular

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Maya Moore WNBA Jerseys Are Very Popular

We've officially run out of superlatives to describe Maya Moore. Her basketball talents transcend the sport and her charisma is undeniable. She's a two-time NCAA national champion, has won virtually every award a college student-athlete is eligible for, and experienced exactly zero growing pains when she graduated to the WNBA earlier this summer.

The first overall pick of the Minnesota Lynx, Moore is averaging 14.5 points a game, led all Western Conference forwards in All-Star voting, and she'll be the first rookie voted to start since 2002.

But there's more (because with Maya there always is…): she's the WNBA leader in jersey sales, too. And we're not talking among all rookies, but everyone.

According to the Associated Press, second on the list behind Moore is the LA Sparks' Candace Parker and the New York Liberty's Essence Carson, followed by Lauren Jackson of the Seattle Storm, Sylvia Fowles of the Chicago Sky and Marion Jones of the Tulsa Shock.

The rankings are based on sales at NBAStore.com from October 2010 through June 2011, which means that Moore needed just a couple months to become the WNBA's most popular player (at least measured in terms of jersey sales).

The rest of the top 10:

7. Diana Taurasi - Phoenix Mercury*
8. Sue Bird - Seattle Storm*
9. Becky Hammon - San Antonio Silver Stars
10. Tina Charles - Connecticut Sun*
*Denotes 2011 WNBA All-Star participant

If you're looking for more proof that Maya is single-handedly moving the merchandising needle, take a look at the five most popular teams in terms of merchandise sales:

1. Minnesota Lynx
2. Seattle Storm
3. Atlanta Dream
4. Los Angeles Sparks
5. Indiana Fever

When Moore's WNBA career is over (and if the past is any guide, it will no doubt be a hall-of-fame one), she should give serious consideration to running for public office. Moore already has two states sewn up -- Connecticut and Minnesota -- and it's only a matter of time before the others follow suit. At this point, it seems inevitable.

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