Much Work Left at Dunkin' Donuts Park Weeks After Due Date - NBC Connecticut

Much Work Left at Dunkin' Donuts Park Weeks After Due Date

(Published Wednesday, June 1, 2016)

There's still a lot of work left on a ballpark that was described as up to 97 percent complete.

The substantial completion date laid out by the developer DoNo Hartford LLC and the construction company Centerplan was May 17.

With the park now two weeks past due, Hartford Yard Goats' owner said he felt obligated to show Hartford taxpayers what their baseball stadium looks like.

Solomon showed NBC Connecticut numerous areas that required work. Bar areas in the VIP section and in centerfield have not been completed, with either exposed metal or wood.

A Look at Unfinished Yard Goats Stadium A Look at Unfinished Yard Goats Stadium

An indoor-outdoor seating area with a fireplace is mainly covered by scaffolding behind homeplate and luxury suites.

In the VIP area, the ceiling ends about a foot before the wall does heading into an outdoor area and there are sprinklers below installed light fixtures.

Bathrooms in right field and in the luxury suites have tile installed but still lack toilets and sinks.

There are sections of seats that were supposed to be installed in the outfield that instead have had concrete poured over them.

The area where Bear's BBQ will eventually be located is mainly an empty construction site with some equipment scattered.

Dunkin Donuts' Park is supposed to have a concourse that connects the entire stadium all the way around but there is currently a five foot section of concrete missing in the outfield, leaving a gap in the concourse.

Developer Jason Rudnick with DoNo Hartford LLC told NBC Connecticut what Solomon put on display is not a fair representation of the baseball stadium.

Rudnick, who has described the progress as between 95 percent and 97 percent over the past several weeks, said much of the main concourse below is finished, in addition to kitchens, most seating, and bathrooms in that section of the stadium.

Solomon said he wanted to show the stadium to the city paying for it, and to show the 300 eventual employees that their workplace isn't yet ready even for training.

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS