What Kind of Storm Damage is Covered by Insurance? - NBC Connecticut

What Kind of Storm Damage is Covered by Insurance?

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    NEWSLETTERS

    What Kind of Storm Damage is Covered by Insurance?

    After a storm, it’s important to find out what kind of damage is covered under your insurance policy.

    (Published Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019)

    After a storm, it’s important to find out what kind of damage is covered under your insurance policy.

    The good news is that most policies will cover typical storm damages.

    According to AAA, any physical damage to a vehicle caused by heavy wind or fallen tree limbs is covered under the “Optional Comprehensive” portion of an auto policy. If your vehicle is damaged by a fallen tree or limbs, you would need to file a claim.

    If a tree falls on your house, your insurance will cover the tree removal and home repairs.

    If your tree falls on your neighbor’s house, your neighbor’s homeowner’s policy would provide coverage. But if a weak, damaged, or decayed tree that you didn’t get rid of and it crashes down onto a neighbor’s home or vehicle, it could be your responsibility or your insurance carrier to pay for damages.

    If a tree falls in your yard, but doesn’t damage anything, that cleanup is coming out of your pocket.

    Any wind-related damage to a home, its roof, and its contents is covered under a homeowner’s insurance. This also includes damage caused by a collapse. And wind-driven rain that caused a roof or wall to open is also covered.

    AAA says homeowners should take immediate action to prevent further damage. Save your receipts. Find out if you have additional living expenses while home repairs are being completed. Schedule a time for an adjuster to inspect your damaged property. Prepare a list of lost and damaged articles and file a claim right away.


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