National Guard Helps Clear Streets in New Haven

All main arterial roads in New Haven are now passable and plows are now working on clearing secondary streets, according to storm status update

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    AP
    A plow clears a path outside Poquonock Elementary School in Windsor, Conn., Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. A howling storm across the Northeast left much of the New York-to-Boston corridor covered with more than three feet of snow on Friday into Saturday morning. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

    In New Haven, the big dig-out continued Sunday after the massive storm dumped 34 inches of snow, paralyzing the city.

    There were 40 trucks and 15 payloaders working to clear the streets, the City of New Haven said in a storm status update on Sunday afternoon. The National Guard was brought in to help city crews with snow removal, according to the city's statement.

    All main arterial roads in New Haven are now passable and plows are now working on clearing secondary streets, according to the update.

    “Passable means that they are clearing enough snow to allow for emergency vehicle passage, usually a one lane path. Once all roads are passable, all streets will be revisited for more extensive removal,” Anna Marioitti, Director of Communications for the city, said in a press release.

    New Haven’s travel ban remained in effect throughout Sunday to prevent cars from getting stuck and to allow snow plowing crews to continue their work more effectively.

    Residents were asked not to throw snow into the street so as not to prolong the cleanup process.

    Instead, they were asked to pile snow on the tree strip—the area of grass or pavement between the sidewalk and the curb—and other areas in the front of their homes.

    Officials warned that any cars parked in the street and obstructing street passage will be tagged and towed.

    The city also announced Sunday that all senior centers and New Haven Public Schools will be closed Monday.

    Due to an increase in carbon monoxide incidents the city urged residents to check their home’s exterior fuel vents and to clear any snow to prevent carbon monoxide build-up.