Digging out from a major winter storm

Stay Off Roads During Storm: Police

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    NEWSLETTERS

    State Police are recommending that all motorists stay off the roads and highways during the storm to prevent major traffic issues.

    Wreckers will be utilized to respond as necessary to clear any road blockages, according to state police.

    Gov. Dannel Malloy tweeted on Friday morning that more than 800 plows, both state and contractor, are ready to be deployed through the storm.

    Salt mixtures are stockpiled geographically around the state and the state Department of Transportation has been pretreating highways, bridges and other problematic sections of road, according to Malloy.

    State Police troopers with emergency equipment and all four-wheel drive vehicles will be deployed to strategic locations across the state to respond to emergencies.

    Additional patrols will assist normal patrols and all off-duty troopers have been placed on stand-by and ordered to be prepared to be called for immediate duty if necessary.

    As the storm is expected to intensify, Troopers recommend that all motorists stay off the roads and

    If travel is necessary during the storm, State Police recommend that you ensure that your vehicle is has proper tires, adequate gas and proper wipers.

    If you must travel during the storm, provide your route of travel details to a family member or friend.
    Check our forecast prior to traveling to gather the latest updates on road conditions and possible closures.

    Make sure you cell phone battery is fully-charged and you have a cell phone, bottles of water, nourishment bars or other non-perishable food, extra clothes, a shovel, flares and blankets in case of emergency. 

    During any snow storm, reduce speed and expand distances between cars. 

    If you become involved in a crash on the highway, move your vehicle to a safe location and call police.  

    If your vehicle becomes stranded or stuck, stay in your vehicle and do not try to walk to safety. 

    Call 911 for help from your cell phone. Run the engine for about 10 minutes each hour for heat.
    Open a window slightly for fresh air and make sure the exhaust pipe is not blocked.  

    During or after snowstorms, the state Department of Motor Vehicles urges drivers to scrape off heavy amounts of snow and ice before traveling or you could be fined $75 fine.

    This state law pertains to passenger cars and other non-commercial vehicles. Fines can increase up to $1,000 for drivers who operate these vehicles when flying snow or ice off them causes personal injury or property damage.

    “All drivers should take an extra few minutes to remove most of the snow and ice so it does not endanger themselves or others,” DMV Commissioner Melody Currey said in a statement. “That will be time well spent to avoid needless hazards on the roadways.”

    A similar law pertaining to commercial vehicles is scheduled to go into effect later this year.

    If you plan to travel by rail, Metro-North has posted a guide to winter weather travel on its Web site.