Photos: Jobs Introduces Apple’s iPhone 4

Apple, introduced its newest breakthrough: the iPhone 4.

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Apple CEO Steve Jobs announces the new iPhone 4, after months of speculation, as he delivers the opening keynote address at the 2010 Apple World Wide Developers conference in San Francisco.
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Jobs highlighted some of the new iPhone 4 features including the "Retina Display", which has 326 pixels per inch. That's four times the number of pixels in the iPhone 3GS, Jobs said. "People haven't even dreamt of a display like this. Once you use a Retina Display, you can't go back."
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"This is one of the most beautiful designs you've ever seen," Apple CEO Steve Jobs said of the iPhone 4."This is beyond a doubt one of the most precise and beautiful things we've ever made."
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Thousands of developers from around the world come to California each year to receive in-depth information and instruction from Apple engineers at the World Wide Developers Conference at the Moscone Center, in San Francisco.
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Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduced the iPad, the company's wireless tablet at a WWDC conference in January of 2010. The iPad has gone on to sell over two million units.
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Steve Jobs unveils the iPad's original price list.
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The touch-screen keyboard on the iPad is almost full-size, Jobs said at the conference.
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Steve Job shows off the secondary keyboard to compliment the touchpad that he said is almost full size.
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The iPad can be used to browse the internet as well as check email and run a calendar, all functions available on the iPhone, but made easier by the iPad's larger screen.
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Partners, including The New York Times, have already created apps for the new device. "We think that we've captured the essence of reading a newspaper... all in a native app," said Martin Nisenholtz of the Times.
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Many in the newspaper industry are hoping the new tablet can be a boon for their industry.
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The video game industry is also looking to cash in on the iPad and its gamer friendly platform.
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The device also connects to Apple's iTunes Store, where viewers can download and watch movies.
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Apple's new app, iBooks, looks like a bookshelf and allows shoppers to browse and purchase books for their iPads.
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Many popular titles will be available through iBooks for download onto the iPad, including Ted Kennedy's, True Compass: A Memoir.
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Apple's fancy new in house chip will power the tablet.
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Readers can drag to the next page or tap left or right. The iPad allows consumers to change the font or font size.
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The iPad boasts a 10" screen and will be available in three models with memory ranging from 16 GB to 64 GB.
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The thin, portable machine, priced at $499 to $829, will ship in late March.
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The world was introduced to its first Macintosh computer in 1984. And things have never been quite the same since. Founder Steven Jobs and CEO/Chairman John Sculley pose with an early Macintosh computer. Jobs later split from the company only to return as interim CEO several years later.
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Jobs leads a lunchtime huddle with his design team in Apple's Cupertino offices in 1982.
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Apple Computer co-founder Steve Jobs shows off the Apple II computer with a chess game displayed on screen.
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Say hello to my little friend, the Macintosh Centris 650 computer.
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Jobs holds Apple's original iMac in 1998.
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Apple's tagline "Think Different" was known around homes across the country and around the world. The company used iconic figures such as the Dalai Lama and John Lennon in its campaigns.
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Steve Jobs, then the interim CEO of Apple, carried the new iBook, laptop computer in 1999.
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Apple Computer Inc. unveiled a new G3 tower with a clamshell design in 1999.
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It's hard to believe a world existed before the invention of the clickwheel. But the original iPod, now laughably dinosaurish, was cutting edge when it was unveiled in October 2001. Apple has sold more than 220 million of them since then.
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Jobs shows Intel CEO Paul Otellin the latest MacBook Pro in 2006.
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"I'm a Mac." "And I'm a PC." Apple's tradition of iconic ads continues. The current campaign featuring John Hodgman and Justin Long started in 2006.
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Remember the Walkman? Apple's smallest iPod, the Shuffle, cost $79 and could hold up to 240 songs when it was released in 2006.
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Known as much for their sleek, sexy product design, Apple has been at the epicenter of sleek, sexy ad campaigns since 1984.
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In 2007 Jobs, in his signature black shirt and jeans, introduces AppleTV during MacWorld. AppleTV was one of the less successful Apple products.
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The iPhone is the latest in Apple's "I must have it!" products. Customers lined up for hours to get the latest release, which was offered at a lower price-point in 2009.
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Apple CEO Steve Jobs, who famously takes the stage in jeans and black shirt to show off the newest drool-worthy gadgets, announced in 2009 he would be taking five months off to undergo a liver transplant. He returned to work and was recently named CEO of the Decade by Forbes.
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Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduces the new iPhone 4 at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference after months of speculation.
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